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Zika Travel Information

Check this page for the most up-to-date information before you make travel plans.

Note: The information on this page is for travelers to international destinations and US territories . For information on Zika in US states, visit  Zika in the US . For the most current information about Zika virus, please visit CDC’s Zika website .

Search for a place by name or zoom and click on the map to see CDC's travel recommendations for Zika. Follow the links in the pop-up message to learn more.

PDF version of the map (printable)

Zika Travel Recommendations by Traveler Type and Country Category

Know before you go! Zika continues to be a problem in many parts of the world. There is no vaccine to prevent infection. Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito ( Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus ). Zika can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause certain birth defects.

Your decision to delay or cancel travel is personal and complex. In making this decision, consider your travel destination and your ability to protect yourself from mosquito bites. CDC recommends that pregnant women and couples planning a pregnancy within the next 3 months consult with a health care provider in making this decision.

Recommendations for US Residents Traveling Abroad

1 These countries have a potential risk of Zika, but we do not have accurate information on the current level of risk. As a result, detection and reporting of new outbreaks may be delayed.

2 Because Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (the mosquitoes that most commonly spreads Zika) are present in these countries, Zika has the potential to be present, along with other mosquito-borne infections. Detection and reporting of cases and outbreaks may be delayed.

3 No Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (the mosquitoes that most commonly spreads Zika) have been reported in these countries. However, other Aedes species mosquitoes have been known to spread Zika, and these may be present.

Areas with Zika outbreaks (red areas):

Areas with current or past transmission but no Zika outbreak (purple areas): American Samoa, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Bonaire, Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curacao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Easter Island, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, Gabon, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mexico, Montserrat, New Caledonia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saba, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Senegal, Singapore, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos, Uganda, United States (Continental US), United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam

Areas with mosquitoes but no reported Zika cases (yellow areas): Afghanistan,  Australia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei, Chad, China, Christmas Island, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guam, Liberia, Madagascar, Madeira Islands, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Niger, Niue, Northern Mariana Islands, Oman, Pakistan, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Taiwan, Tanzania, The Gambia, Togo, Tokelau, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uruguay, Wallis and Futuna, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Areas with no mosquitoes that spread Zika (green areas): Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Azores, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bermuda, Bosnia and Herzegovina, British Indian Ocean Territory, Bulgaria, Canada, Canary Islands, Chile, Cocos Islands, Comoros, Corsica, Croatia, Crozet Islands, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Eswatini, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Finland, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kerguelen Islands, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Malta, Mauritius, Mayotte, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norfolk Island, North Korea, North Macedonia, Norway, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Saint Helena, Saint Paul and New Amsterdam Islands, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, San Marino, São Tomé and Principe, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vatican City, Wake Island, Western Sahara

Technical note : Because of variations in laboratory and surveillance capacity internationally, data are not available to define levels of risk. CDC, the World Health Organization, and the European CDC have jointly reviewed the scientific literature.

  • Pregnant Women
  • Couples Trying to Become Pregnant
  • Visiting Friends or Family in an Area with Zika
  • US Citizens and Residents Living in Areas with Ongoing Zika Virus Transmission
  • Zika: For Healthcare Providers on CDC's Zika site
  • Zika in CDC Yellow Book
  • Clinical Guidance for Healthcare Providers Caring for Pregnant Women
  • Update: Interim Guidance for Preconception Counseling and Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus for Men with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States, August 2018

Travelers can prevent Zika

Infographic: Travelers Can Protect Themselves from Zika

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Zika: A Guide for Travelers (5-page brochure)

Zika: Una guía de los CDC para los viajeros

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Empaca para prevenir el Zika (video en español)

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zika travel advisory mexico

PLAN YOUR TRIP

zika travel advisory mexico

The Zika Virus in Mexico: What You Need to Know

Author: Jessica S.

March 2, 2020

General Zika (ZIKV) Information

The Zika Virus is a mosquito-borne viral infection that is transmitted by the same type of mosquito linked to dengue and chikungunya.

Cases have been identified across four continents. It has been detected in more than 27 countries in the Americas, including the United States.

One of the major concerns regarding Zika is that its spread may be linked to birth defects such as microcephaly, prompting some countries to advise pregnant women against going to areas where Zika has been detected.

Symptoms can include mild fever, rashes, conjunctivitis, muscle or joint pain, and a general feeling of illness that begins two to seven days after infection. Four out of five people who are infected show no symptoms at all. If you are not a woman of childbearing age, pregnant, or trying to get pregnant, the Zika virus is unlikely to cause you any serious trouble.

ZIKV (Zika virus) cannot be transmitted from person to person through air, food, or water. Nevertheless, the virus can be transmitted via sexual contact and there are strong indications of infection via blood transfusion.

There have been no deaths in Mexico attributed to the Zika Virus so far. Those infected usually just need to take aspirin, drink water, and get lots of rest, but aspirin and NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) should be avoided until dengue can be ruled out. Medicine such as acetaminophen is suggested to relieve fever and pain. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon. There is no known vaccine or cure for Zika at this time.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is developing a Zika vaccine that shows promise in its first phase of testing. As part of its phase two trial, the NIAID is “ currently leading an international effort to evaluate ” the vaccine. Mexico is part of this international effort .

Important Update:  On November 18, 2016, the World Health Organization declared that Zika was no longer a global health emergency and should be considered a dangerous mosquito-borne virus, like malaria or yellow fever. Read, “ Zika Is No Longer a Global Emergency”

zika travel advisory mexico

CURRENT UPDATE: March 2, 2020 ZIKA VIRUS IN MEXICO

There has been 1 confirmed case of Zika across Mexico in 2020, but we will continue to carefully monitor the situation. Find a state-by-state breakdown here:

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has no current ZIKV notice for Mexico, but it acknowledges there’s a risk of Zika Virus in the country.

Mexico has, and continues to take, steps to prevent the spread of the Zika virus infection through public service announcements, campaigns and preventive travel advisories and warnings. Mexico’s Epidemiological Surveillance System is fully prepared to recognize and diagnose infections by the Zika virus.

The WHO has stated that “there should be no restrictions on travel or trade with countries, areas and/or territories with Zika virus transmission.”

There are currently no restrictions against travelers visiting Mexico. Both the US Government and Mexican authorities have not placed a general restriction on visiting Mexico, only urged caution to prevent mosquito bites.

GUIDELINES AND PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

  • Stay informed about the ZIKV situation as it develops.
  • Prevent mosquito bites by covering exposed skin with sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks.
  • Sleep under a mosquito net to prevent bites.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents on exposed skin and reapply as directed. Insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus are very effective and safe when used according to the label. If you’re also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen first and insect repellent second.
  • The CDC recommends that women who are pregnant in any trimester consider postponing travel to areas where there’s a risk of Zika virus transmission. If pregnant women do opt to travel to Zika affected areas, the CDC recommends avoiding mosquito bites during their trip. Specific guidance for women who are trying to become pregnant is also included in the CDC advisory .

JOURNEY MEXICO RECOMMENDS

At Journey Mexico, we take the health of our clients very seriously, but we strongly believe that the Zika virus does not pose an extraordinary threat to our travelers.

We have no known cases of Zika with any of our passengers, staff members, and guides. We continue to monitor Mexico’s specific situation.

We advise, as always, to travel sensibly and take precautions to avoid getting mosquito bites, as they can also transmit other diseases, like dengue. We are only recommending that pregnant women consider visiting Mexico at another time in accordance with CDC/WHO advice. If you’re considering Mexico as a destination for future travel, we recommend purchasing travel insurance.

The mosquitoes that spread Zika usually do not live at elevations above 6,500 feet (2,000 meters) because of environmental conditions. Travelers whose itineraries are limited to areas above this elevation are at minimal risk of getting Zika from a mosquito.

zika travel advisory mexico

*The categories shown on this map are intended as a general guideline and should not be considered to indicate absolute risk. Elevation may vary within an area to a larger extent than this map can depict. The presence of mosquitoes may change seasonally, with increasing temperatures or rainfall, and may change over time.

To view Mexico’s Secretary of Health’s most recent update of confirmed cases in a state-by-state assessment click here and scroll down to ‘Documentos’   and click on the arrow next to “Cuadro Casos Zika.”

 Messages from the  Mexico Tourism Board

Zika Virus Cases Are NOT Reasons to Change Travel Plans

mexico-zika-ovt-2016

Mexico Tourism Board’s Regional Director for North America, Rodrigo Esponda, said in an interview with Travel Weekly: “Zika is not particular to any destination. Where it has existed in Mexico has been very localized, and there have been very few cases. Throughout the years Mexico has had effective campaigns to eradicate other mosquito-borne diseases. The campaign has been done in the tropical areas, mostly the south and the rural areas, and these campaigns have been very effective. The places where Zika has taken place have been specific and rural with difficult access. It has not been an element that is present in the resorts.”

zika

source: Travel Weekly / One-on-one with tourism board director by Meagan Drillinger

In an effort to help travelers understand precisely where in Mexico cases of the Zika virus have been found the Mexico Tourism Board released a map indicating where Zika has been reported.

“All of the resort areas are Zika-free … the Zika problem is not throughout the country,” said Rodolfo Lopez Negrete, CEO of Mexico’s Tourism Board.

Negrete noted that there are currently 65 reported Zika cases in Mexico. Of those, 35 are in Chiapas, 21 in Oaxaca, four in Nueva Leon, and one each in Jalisco, Sinaloa, Guerrero, Veracruz, and Yucatan.

zika mexico map

source: Travel Weekly / Mexico draws map indicating location of Zika cases by Michelle Baran

February 9, 2016 – Mexico City –  No need to cancel vacation plans to Mexico’s top hot spots as the Mexico Tourism Board continues to improve on efforts to reduce the risk of Zika virus, especially in major international tourism destinations.

Through ongoing proactive communications and meetings with tourism destinations and travel partners, the goal is to keep the flow of information sharing open through open dialogue. Preventive measures and educational materials have been developed and disseminated, including posters and key facts; and infection reducing procedures are being reinforced.

“Our Mexico Tourism partners continue to demonstrate their strength in addressing travelers’ concerns,” states Jack E. Richards, President and CEO of Pleasant Holidays. “It’s very clear they are committed to being very proactive to reduce the risk of Zika, especially in the primary beach destinations of Huatulco, Mazatlan, Vallarta-Nayarit, Ixtapa, Cancun, Riviera Maya, and Los Cabos. The Mexico Tourism Board sets a high standard for others to follow in similar situations.”

In a related survey released by the Travel Leader’s Group conducted to gauge the impact of the Zika virus on vacation travel, their findings note the majority of travelers are continuing with their travel plans where there have been confirmed Zika virus cases.

The latest reports from Mexico are a total of 65 cases in only 8 states. Of the prior 34 reported cases, patients are on the road to recovery and new cases will be treated immediately. The Zika virus reported is a low-grade strain and non-life threatening. It is important to note that the cases in Mexico represent a nominal percentage (less than .003%) of all the cases, globally.

“The reality is Zika virus does not pose a massive risk to health in Mexico,” notes Pablo Kuri Morales, Mexican Undersecretary for Prevention and Health Promotion.

The World Health Organization (W.H.O.) February 1, 2016 statement confirms there is no reason to cancel or change travel plans to any country reporting Zika virus cases, including for pregnant women. With this advisory applying to all countries, even those with high numbers of cases, it’s yet another reason that Mexico, with a very low number of cases, continues to be a destination that millions of tourists are visiting each month.

The meeting focused on a report of the latest Zika virus facts, the prevention and containment efforts by the Mexican government and tourism industry, and continued practice of close coordination with the international tourism industry.

Dr. Alberto Diaz Quiñonez, Deputy General Director of the Mexican Institute for Diagnostic and Epidemiology, shared that Mexico has only 34 confirmed cases of the Zika virus, representing just 0.03% of the total cases reported globally. All of these cases are from Mexican nationals living in rural areas, far from the tourist destinations frequently visited by international tourists.

Dr. Diaz shared, “While the Zika virus is inevitable in Mexico given its vast size, climate and trade in the region, the number of cases remains very low. Strong prevention efforts have already been in practice for years to prevent similar diseases.” He went on to emphasize, “Given these facts, there is no threat to tourists visiting Mexico.”

For several years Mexico’s major tourist destinations and businesses have practiced world-class procedures to control the mosquito population and minimize cases of dengue and other diseases.

Hotels, restaurants, airports, and other areas frequently visited by tourists have in place mosquito eradication practices and closely follow international guidelines to monitor and control their growth. Given that the Zika virus is contracted in a manner similar to other mosquito-borne diseases that Mexico has long been combating, the entire country and especially its tourist destinations, are already well prepared to contain this latest disease.

Dr. Diaz referenced the World Health Organization (WHO)’s February 1, 2016, statement confirming that there is no reason to cancel or change travel plans to any country reporting Zika cases, including for pregnant women. With this advisory applying to all countries, even those with high numbers of cases, it’s yet another reason that Mexico, with a very low number of cases, continues to be a destination that millions of tourists are visiting each month.

Following the meeting, the group of international tour operators affirmed that Mexico’s comprehensive preparations and control measures give them the confidence to continue to recommend travel to Mexico for all tourists. Mexico tourism industry not impacted by the Zika Virus Mexico City, Mexico, January 21, 2016 – The Mexico Tourism Board reported that the Zika virus infection is a new and emerging disease in the country with only a minimal number of cases identified. Epidemiologic studies have found that the virus is under control in the country. With very few cases identified and containment efforts in place the tourism industry in Mexico has not been affected and is not at risk.

The Ministry of Health of Mexico launched a variety of measures to maintain epidemiological control of the virus and limit its potential to spread. As the Zika virus infection is similar to that of dengue and chikungunya, prevention programs, health communication activities, and epidemiology screenings implemented since 2014, have helped to minimize the breeding of the Aedes aegypti mosquito in the country.

Measures to prevent and control the virus will remain in place to inhibit an outbreak. Additionally, stronger clinical services and operations, epidemiology screenings, health communication programs, and vector control efforts have been deployed.

The Mexico Tourism Board urges visitors to follow the guidelines presented by the Ministry of Health of Mexico to reduce the chance of mosquito bites.

Recommendations for the public and pregnant women: • Wear long sleeves, pants, and bug repellant • Wash and cover the containers and dishes that hold water • Keep doors and windows closed and use screens • Follow prenatal care guidelines

zika-in-mexico

Sources & More:

Latin American Travel Association – Zika Virus Questions and Answers (Mar 2, 2016) World Tourism Organization UNWTO – Zika Statement Center for Disease Control and Prevention – Zika Center for Disease Control and Prevention – Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During Zika Outbreak Pan American Health Organization – Zika Mexican Government – Zika Virus Infection in Mexico Mexico’s Secretary of Health – Zika (Spanish) The Guardian – Zika Virus Spreading Explosively About.com – Zika Virus in Mexico

This post was written and published on January 29, 2016. As information continues to evolve with research and reported cases, we will add update this post as best as we can, noting any additions. We recommend the CDC website for the most up to date information. 

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Watch CBS News

CDC makes notable exception to Zika travel warning

March 14, 2016 / 3:20 PM EDT / AP

The U.S. government revised its Zika travel warnings Friday, saying it's OK for pregnant women to travel to Mexico City and other places at high elevation in outbreak regions.

The kind of mosquito that spreads the Zika virus is rare at higher elevations because of the lack of humidity and other conditions, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infections from Zika or the related dengue virus haven't been seen high up.

Since mid-January, the health agency has advised pregnant women to avoid travel to areas with Zika outbreaks because the virus may be linked to a surge of birth defects in Brazil . The list has grown to about three dozen destinations, most in Latin America or the Caribbean.

Zika virus outbreak: These places are most at risk

Friday's revision excludes any part of those countries above 6,500 feet (2,000 meters).

CDC officials insisted science drove the change, but acknowledged there were concerns that overly broad travel warnings might unnecessarily hamper trade and tourism.

"I suspect several countries will be quite pleased" by the revision, said Dr. Martin Cetron, who leads CDC's division of global migration and quarantine.

Five of the countries have large cities or sizeable areas at high altitudes, including Mexico City, Bolivia's La Paz and Colombia's Bogota.

Mexico Health Department's Dr. Cuitlahuac Ruiz Matuz said authorities there had objected to a blanket travel advisory for the country before it was issued, and had lobbied CDC for a change.

"Now they are correcting things a little bit," Ruiz said.

He argued that the CDC should be even more specific and report where Zika has been detected. There have been 143 confirmed cases in Mexico, 128 in the southern states of Chiapas and Oaxaca. The remaining 15 are spread over six other states.

Mosquitoes:

Besides the capital, Mexico has other large cities such as Puebla, Toluca and Guanajuato and the popular tourist destination of San Cristobal de las Casas at elevations above 6,500 feet.

Experts think most people infected with Zika virus don't get sick. And those that do usually develop mild symptoms -- fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes. But the unexpected numbers of birth defects in Zika outbreak areas of Brazil have raised alarms.

An estimated 40 million U.S. travelers went to Zika outbreak destinations last year, including about a half million pregnant women, CDC officials estimate. The CDC advises all travelers to Zika areas to use insect repellent and take other steps to avoid mosquito bites .

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Zika virus: Latest travel health advice

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Zika virus, along with other mosquito-transmitted diseases, such as malaria, dengue and chikungunya, are transmitted by mosquitoes that live in warmer climates. To determine if the area you are travelling to is a country or area with risk of Zika virus or a country or area with a Zika virus outbreak:

  • Consult the Travel Advice and Advisories page , and select your destination. Information on diseases spread by insects, such as Zika virus, is found under the 'Health' tab.
  • Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic at least 6 weeks before you travel.

Canada posts travel-related information on travel.gc.ca.

Latest travel health notice on Zika:

Advice for travellers: Zika Travel Health Notice

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Travel Advisory August 22, 2023

See state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Passport must be valid at time of entry

One page per stamp

Yes, if visiting for more than 180 days

See Travelers’ Health section

Embassies and Consulates

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FOR U.S. CITIZENS IN MEXICO From Mexico: 800-681-9374 or 55-8526-2561 From the United States: 1-844-528-6611

U.S. Citizen Services Inquiries: Contact Form

U.S. Embassy Mexico City Paseo de la Reforma 305 Colonia Cuauhtémoc 06500 Ciudad de México

U.S. Consulate General Ciudad Juarez

Paseo de la Victoria #3650 Fracc. Partido Senecú 32543 Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua

U.S. Consulate General Guadalajara Progreso 175 Colonia Americana 44160 Guadalajara, Jalisco

U.S. Consulate General Hermosillo

Monterey, Esqueda 141 El Centenario 83260 Hermosillo, Sonora

U.S. Consulate General Matamoros

Constitución No. 1 Colonia Jardín 87330 Matamoros, Tamaulipas

U.S. Consulate General Merida

Calle 60 No. 338-K x 29 y 31 Colonia Alcalá Martin 97050 Mérida, Yucatán

U.S. Consulate General Monterrey

Avenida Alfonso Reyes 150 Colonia Valle del Poniente 66196 Santa Catarina, Nuevo León

U.S. Consulate General Nogales

Calle San José s/n Fracc. Los Álamos 84065 Nogales, Sonora

U.S. Consulate General Nuevo Laredo

Paseo Colon 1901 Colonia Madero 88260 Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas

U.S. Consulate General Tijuana

Paseo de las Culturas s/n Mesa de Otay Delegación Centenario 22425 Tijuana, Baja California

Consular Agencies

Acapulco Hotel Continental Emporio Costera M. Alemán 121 – Office 14 39670 Acapulco, Guerrero Cancun

Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH Torre La Europea, Despacho 301 77500 Cancún, Quintana Roo

Los Cabos Las Tiendas de Palmilla L-B221, Km. 27.5 Carretera Transpeninsular 23406 San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur

Playa Gaviotas 202, Local 10

Zona Dorada 82110 Mazatlán, Sinaloa

Oaxaca Macedonio Alcalá 407, Office 20 68000 Oaxaca, Oaxaca

Piedras Negras Abasolo 211, Local 3, Centro 26000 Piedras Negras, Coahuila Playa del Carmen Plaza Progreso, Local 33 Carretera Federal Puerto Juarez-Chetumal, Mz. 293 Lt. 1. 77710 Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo

Puerto Vallarta Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros 85 Sur, Local L-7 63732 Nuevo Nayarit, Nayarit San Miguel de Allende Plaza La Luciérnaga, Libramiento Jose Manuel Zavala 165, Locales 4 y 5 Colonia La Luciérnaga 37745 San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato

Destination Description

See the  State Department’s Fact Sheet on Mexico  for more information on U.S.-Mexico relations.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

A valid passport book is required to enter Mexico by air, and those attempting to enter at an airport with a U.S. passport card only may be denied admission.

Review the Mexican government’s most current  entry, exit, and visa requirements  ( Spanish only ) or visit the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information.

For travelers entering Mexico by air only, Mexican immigration authorities implemented a process to replace the previous paper Forma Migratoria Multiple or FMM with a Forma Migratoria Multiple Digital or FMMD.  The FMMD process is in place at all 66 international airports in Mexico.  Upon arrival at an airport, Mexican immigration authorities will determine a traveler’s authorized length of stay and either place a date stamp in the traveler’s passport or direct the traveler through a self-service electronic gate (E-Gate) that will generate a printed receipt with QR code. Air travelers who wish to download a record of their FMMD or find more information on the FMMD process may visit the National Migration Institute’s (INM) website .

Travelers entering Mexico by land should have a valid passport book or card.  If you enter Mexico by land and plan to travel beyond the immediate border area (approximately 12 miles or 20 kilometers into Mexico), you must stop at an INM office to obtain an entry permit (Forma Migratoria Multiple or FMM), even if not explicitly directed to do so by Mexican officials.  INM may opt to allow tourists entry of up to 180 days without a visa or may limit authorized stays to shorter periods at their discretion; visitors should confirm the specific length of authorized stay written on the entry permit (FMM) or by the stamp in their passport. Mexican immigration authorities could ask you to present both your passport and entry permit if applicable at any point and may detain you while they review your immigration status if you are not carrying your passport and proof of legal status in Mexico, or if you have overstayed your authorized stay. Immigration check points are common in the interior of Mexico, including in popular tourist areas far from the border.  

You will also need a temporary vehicle import permit to bring a U.S.-registered vehicle beyond the border zone. These permits are processed through Banjercito and require a deposit that will be refunded once the vehicle leaves Mexico.  For more information, visit the  Banjercito  website ( Spanish only ).

Baja California, Baja California Sur, and Sonora have a “hassle-free” zone that allows cars traveling without an entry permit or car registration within the zone. 

Mexican authorities can impound a vehicle that enters the country without a valid U.S. registration, a vehicle driven by a Mexican national who is not resident in the United States, or a vehicle found beyond the border zone without the temporary import permit.

Mexican law permits Mexican immigration authorities to deny foreigners entry into Mexico if they have been charged with or convicted of a serious crime in Mexico or elsewhere.

Travelers bringing in goods beyond their personal effects worth $300.00 or more must declare those goods with Mexican customs (SAT) Mexican customs  ( Spanish only ) or risk having them confiscated. This also applies to used goods or clothing, including items for donation. U.S. citizens driving such items into Mexico without declaring them or without sufficient funds to pay duty fees are subject to having their vehicle seized by Mexican customs authorities. For further information about customs regulations, please read our  customs information page .

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents in Mexico.

A parent or legal guardian departing Mexico with minor children should carry a notarized consent letter from the other parent if traveling separately. INM requires at least one parent to complete a  SAM  ( Formato de Salida de Menores, Spanish only ) for all Mexican or foreign minors with Temporary Resident, Temporary Student Resident, or Permanent Resident status departing Mexico alone or with a third party.  Further information about the  prevention of international parental child abduction  is available on our website.

Find information on dual nationality , and customs regulations on our websites. Both Mexico and the United States allow dual nationality.

Safety and Security

Travelers are urged to review the  Mexico Travel Advisory  for information about safety and security concerns affecting the country on a state-by-state basis.

U.S. citizens traveling to and residing in Mexico should not expect public health and safety standards like those in the United States. Even where such standards exist, enforcement varies by location. Travelers should mitigate the risk of illness or injury by taking standard health and safety precautions.

The phone number to report emergencies in Mexico is “911.”  Although there may be English-speaking operators available, it is best to seek the assistance of a Spanish speaker to place the call.

Crime:  Crime in Mexico occurs at a high rate and can be violent, from random street crime to cartel-related attacks. Over the past year, Mission Mexico has assisted U.S. citizens who were victims of armed robbery, carjacking, extortion, homicide, kidnapping, pick-pocketing, and sexual assault. Increased levels of cartel-related violence have resulted in territorial disputes and targeted killings, injuring or killing innocent bystanders. Travelers who find themselves in an active shooter scenario should flee in the opposite direction, if possible, or drop to the ground, preferably behind a hard barrier.

Drivers on roads and highways may encounter government checkpoints, which often include National Guard or military personnel. State and local police also set up checkpoints in and around cities and along the highways to deter criminal activity and enforce traffic laws. In some parts of Mexico, criminal organizations and other non-governmental actors have been known to erect unauthorized checkpoints and have abducted or threatened violence against those who fail to stop and/or pay a “toll.” When approaching a checkpoint, regardless of whether it is official, cooperate and avoid any actions that may appear suspicious or aggressive.

While Mexican authorities endeavor to safeguard the country’s major resort areas and tourist destinations, those areas have not been immune to the types of violence and crime experienced elsewhere in Mexico. In some areas of Mexico, response time of local police is often slow. In addition, filing police reports can be time consuming. See our  Mexico Travel Advisory  for more information.

Demonstrations  occur frequently.  They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events.  Protesters in Mexico may block traffic on roads, including major thoroughfares, or take control of toll booths on highways.  Travelers who encounter protesters who demand unofficial tolls are generally allowed to pass upon payment.  U.S. citizens should avoid participating in demonstrations or other activities that might be deemed political by authorities, as Mexican law prohibits political activities by foreign citizens and such actions may result in detention or deportation.

  • Demonstrations can be unpredictable, avoid areas around protests and demonstrations.  
  • Past demonstrations have turned violent.
  • Check local media for updates and traffic advisories.  

International Financial Scams:  See the  Department of State  and the  FBI  pages for information.  

Internet romance and financial scams are prevalent in Mexico. Scams are often initiated through Internet postings/profiles or by unsolicited emails and letters. Scammers almost always pose as U.S. citizens who have no one else to turn to for help. Common scams include:   

  • Romance/Online dating 
  • Money transfers 
  • Lucrative sales 
  • Grandparent/Relative targeting 
  • Free Trip/Luggage 
  • Inheritance notices 
  • Bank overpayments 

Mexico’s consumer protection agency,  PROFECO  (Procuraduría Federal del Consumidor, Spanish only), can sometimes  provide assistance  (Spanish only) to victims of such scams. In addition, there have been allegations of banking fraud perpetrated by private bankers against U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens who believe they have been victims of fraud can file a police report  file a complaint  (Spanish only) with the Mexican banking regulatory agency, CONDUSEF  (Comision Nacional para la Proteccion y Defensa de los Usuarios de Servicios Financieros, Spanish only), or consult with an attorney.

Victims of Crime:  U.S. victims of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest Consulate for assistance.  Report emergencies to the local police at 911, report crimes already committed to the Ministerio Publico, and contact the Embassy or Consulate at +52-55-85262561.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

U.S. citizen victims of crime should contact the local authorities to file a Mexican police report before departing Mexico. In most instances, victims of crime will file reports with the Ministerio Publico (equivalent to the office of public prosecutor or district attorney in the United States) and not with police first responders. U.S. citizens should also inform the  U.S. Embassy or nearest consulat e . 

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .    We can:

  • help you find  appropriate medical care ,
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police,
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent,
  • provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation and following its conclusion, 
  • provide a  list of local attorneys ,
  • provide information on  victim’s compensation programs in the United States ,
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution,
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home,
  • replace a stolen or lost passport.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the  U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate  for assistance.

Kidnapping:  Mexico experiences very high rates of kidnapping.  If you believe you or your U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) relative has been kidnapped, please contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate immediately.

Robbery:  Mexico experiences robberies, typically in cities, in which abductors force victims to use their debit or credit card to withdraw money from ATMs in exchange for their release. Perpetrators commonly work in cooperation with, or pose as, taxi drivers. To minimize the risk of such robberies:

  • Only use a reputable taxi company or a trusted ride-sharing app.
  • Book taxis through your hotel or an authorized taxi stand.

Extortion:  Extortion schemes are common in Mexico.  In a typical scheme known as a virtual kidnapping, criminals convince family members that a relative has been abducted, when, in fact, the person is safe but unreachable.  The purported abductors will often use threats to persuade victims to isolate themselves, making communication with family members less likely.  Unable to reach their loved ones, family members often consent to paying the “ransom” demand.  Criminals use various means to gather information about potential victims, including monitoring social media sites, eavesdropping on conversations, or using information taken from a stolen cell phone.  Some of these extortions have been conducted from Mexican prisons.  You can reduce the risk of falling victim to this type of extortion through the following:

  • Do not discuss travel plans, your room number, or any other personal information within earshot of strangers.
  • Do not divulge personal business details to strangers in person or over the phone, especially when using hotel phones.
  • If you are threatened on the phone, hang up immediately.

Sexual Assault:  Rape and sexual assault are serious problems in some resort areas. Many of these incidents occur at night or during the early morning hours, in hotel rooms, on hotel grounds, or on deserted beaches. In some cases, assailants drug the drinks of victims before assaulting them. Pay attention to your surroundings and to who might have handled your drink.

Credit/Debit Card “Skimming:”  There have been instances of fraudulent charges or withdrawals from accounts due to “skimmed” cards. If you choose to use credit or debit cards, you should regularly check your account to ensure there are no unauthorized transactions. Travelers should limit the amount of cash they carry in public, exercise caution when withdrawing cash from ATMs, and avoid ATMs located in isolated or unlit areas.

Alcohol:  If you choose to drink alcohol, it is important to do so in moderation and to stop and seek medical attention if you begin to feel ill. There have been reports of individuals falling ill or blacking out after consuming unregulated alcohol. The Mexican Federal Commission for the Protection against Sanitary Risk,  COFEPRIS  ( Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios, Spanish only ), is responsible for inspecting hotels, restaurants, and other establishments for health violations, including reports of unregulated alcohol. Please email COFEPRIS at  [email protected]  for more information or if you wish to file a report. You can file a report online (Spanish only) via the COFEPRIS website, by calling the COFEPRIS call center at 800 033 50 50 (from Mexico) or +52 (55) 5080-5425 (from the United States), or by scheduling an appointment  (Spanish only)  to visit a COFEPRIS office.

There have also been instances of criminals drugging drinks to rob or sexually assault victims. Additionally, if you feel you have been the victim of unregulated alcohol or another serious health violation, you should notify the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate . You may also contact the U.S. Department of State – Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries).

Drug Smuggling:  Mexican criminal organizations are engaged in a violent struggle to control trafficking routes. Criminal organizations smuggling drugs into the United States have targeted unsuspecting individuals who regularly cross the border. Frequent border crossers are advised to vary their routes and travel times and to closely monitor their vehicles to avoid being targeted.

Tourism:  In major cities and resort areas, the tourism industry is generally well-regulated.  Best practices and safety inspections are regularly enforced.  Hazardous areas and activities are identified with appropriate signage, and professional staff is typically on hand in support of organized activities.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is widely available throughout the country.  Outside of a major metropolitan center, it may take more time for first responders and medical professionals to stabilize a patient and/or provide life-saving assistance.  In smaller towns and areas less commonly frequented by foreign tourists, the tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur.  Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in or near major cities.  First responders are generally unable to access areas outside of major cities to provide urgent medical treatment.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Since 2016, Mexico has opened seven multilingual Centers for the Care and Protection of Tourists (CAPTA) and Tourist Assistance Centers (CATTAC) in Los Cabos, La Paz, Acapulco, Playa del Carmen, Mazatlan, Ciudad Madero, and Queretaro. These offices have proven helpful assisting U.S. citizen visitors in resolving disputes with merchants and government entities, filing criminal reports, securing needed services, and locating special needs accommodations. 

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities prior to practicing or operating a business.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or nearest consulate immediately. See our  webpage  for further information.

The Mexican government is required by international law to contact the U.S. Embassy or consulate promptly when a U.S. citizen is arrested if the arrestee so requests.  This requirement does not apply to dual nationals.  

Firearms and Other Weapons:  Weapons laws in Mexico vary by state, but it is generally illegal for travelers to carry weapons of any kind including firearms, knives, daggers, brass knuckles, as well as ammunition (even used shells). Illegal firearms trafficking from the United States to Mexico is a major concern, and the Department of State warns all U.S. citizens against taking any firearm or ammunition into Mexico. If you are caught entering Mexico with any type of weapon, including firearms or ammunitions, you likely will face severe penalties, including prison time. U.S.-issued permits allowing an individual to carry weapons are not valid in Mexico.  Visit the Department’s  Traveling Abroad with Firearms webpage .

Vessels entering Mexican waters with firearms or ammunition on board must have a permit previously issued by a Mexican embassy or consulate.

Drugs:  Drug possession and use, including medical marijuana, is illegal in Mexico and may result in a lengthy jail sentence or fines.  

Electronic Cigarettes (Vaping Devices):  It is illegal for travelers to bring electronic cigarettes (vaping devices) and all vaping solutions to Mexico. Customs will confiscate vaping devices and solutions and travelers could be fined or arrested. Avoid delays and possible sanctions by not taking these items to Mexico. 

Real Estate and Time Shares:  U.S. citizens should exercise caution when considering time-share investments or purchasing real estate and be aware of the aggressive tactics used by some sales representatives. Before initiating a real estate purchase or time-share investment, U.S. citizens should consult with a Mexican attorney to learn about important regulations and laws that govern real estate property.

Mountain Climbing and Hiking:  The Mexican government has declared the area around the Popocatepetl and the Colima volcanoes off limits. In remote rural areas, there can be limited cell phone coverage and internet connectivity, and it may be difficult for rescue teams and local authorities to reach climbers and hikers in distress.

Potential for Natural Disasters:  Mexico is in an active earthquake zone. Tsunamis may occur following significant earthquakes. For information concerning disasters, see:

  • U.S. Embassy Mexico City website
  • Civil Protection  ( Proteccion Civil, Spanish only ) provides information from the Mexican Government about natural disaster preparedness
  • U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  provides general information about natural disaster preparedness
  • U.S. Geological Survey  provides updates on recent seismic and volcanic activity

Storm Season:  Tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico or along the Caribbean and Pacific Coast between May and November can produce heavy winds and rain. Please visit our  Hurricane Season  webpage for more information.

Spring Break:  Millions of U.S. citizens visit Mexican beach resorts each year, especially during “ spring break ” season. The legal drinking age in Mexico is 18. See the “Alcohol” section above to learn more about the risks associated with drinking, as well as reports of illnesses associated with the possible consumption of unregulated alcohol.

Resort Areas and Water Activities:  Beaches in Mexico may be dangerous due to strong currents, rip tides, and rogue waves. Warning notices and flags on beaches should be taken seriously. Not all hazardous beaches are clearly marked. If black or red warning flags are up, do not enter the water. Strong currents can lead to dangerous conditions for even the most experienced swimmers. U.S. citizens simply walking along the shore or wading have been swept out to sea by rogue waves, and some citizens have drowned or disappeared at Mexican beaches. Avoid the consumption of alcohol while engaging in water activities and do not swim alone. 

Boats used for excursions may not be covered by accident insurance and sometimes lack adequate life jackets, radios, and tools to make repairs.  Participation in adventure sports may not be covered by accident insurance and safety protections and regulations for these activities may differ from U.S. standards.  Visit  our website  and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about adventure travel.

Counterfeit and Pirated Goods:  Although counterfeit and pirated goods are prevalent in many countries, they may still be illegal according to local laws. You may also be subject to fines or forced to relinquish the goods if you bring them back to the United States. See the  U.S. Department of Justice website  for more information.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report  – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report  – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTQI+ Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or on the organization of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Intersex (LGBTQI+) events in Mexico. However, due to sporadic reports of violence targeting LGBTQI+ individuals, U.S. citizens should exercise discretion in identifying themselves publicly as LGBTQI+. See our LGBTQI+ Travel Information page and Section 6 of the  Department of State’s Human Rights Report for Mexico  for further details.

Travelers with Disabilities:   Mexican law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical, sensory, intellectual, or mental disabilities.  Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is not as prevalent as in the United States.  The most common types of accessibility may include accessible facilities, information, and communication/access to services/ease of movement or access.  Expect accessibility to be limited in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure in more rural and remote parts of the country, and more common in public transportation, lodging, communication/information, and general infrastructure in major cities.  U.S. citizens with disabilities should consult individual hotels and service providers in advance of travel to ensure they are accessible.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  There were several reports of sexual assault or domestic violence involving U.S. citizen women over the past year. See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

Excellent health facilities are available in Mexico City and other major cities. Ambulance services are widely available, but training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards. Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi to a health provider. Mexican facilities often require payment “up front” before providing medical care, and most hospitals in Mexico do not accept U.S. health insurance. A list of doctors and hospitals is available on the U.S. Embassy or consulate website.

U.S. citizens have lodged complaints against some private hospitals in Cancun, the Riviera Maya, and Los Cabos to include exorbitant prices and inflexible collection measures.  Travelers should obtain complete information on billing, pricing, and proposed medical procedures before agreeing to any medical care in these locations.  Be aware that some resorts have exclusive agreements with medical providers and ambulance services, which may limit your choices in seeking emergency medical attention.  Some hospitals in tourist centers utilize sliding scales, deciding on rates for services based on negotiation and on the patient’s perceived ability to pay.  In some instances, providers have been known to determine the limits of a patient’s credit card or insurance, quickly reach that amount in services rendered, and subsequently discharge the patient or transfer them to a public hospital.

Visit the  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  website for information on Medical Tourism.

For emergency services in Mexico, dial  911 .  Although there may be English-speaking operators available, it is best to seek the assistance of a Spanish speaker to place the call.

Ambulance services are: 

  • widely available in major cities but training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards,
  • not present in many remote and rural areas of the country,   
  • not equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment.  
  • Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi or private vehicle to the nearest major hospital rather than wait for an ambulance.  

We do not pay medical bills:  Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas.  Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.  

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See  our webpage  for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas. 

We strongly recommend  supplemental insurance  to cover medical evacuation as well.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.  Check the Mexican government’s Drug Schedule to ensure the medication is legal in Mexico. 

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information :

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC)

Air Quality: Visit AirNow Department of State for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

The U.S. Embassy maintains a list of doctors and hospitals .  We do not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic. 

Medical Tourism and Elective Surgery: 

  • U.S. citizens have suffered serious complications or died during or after having cosmetic or other elective surgery.   
  • Medical tourism is a rapidly growing industry. People seeking health care overseas should understand that medical systems operate differently from those in the United States and are not subject to the same rules and regulations.  Anyone interested in traveling for medical purposes should consult with their local physician before traveling and visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information on Medical Tourism.  
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for information on Medical Tourism, the risks of medical tourism, and what you can do to prepare before traveling to Mexico. 
  • We strongly recommend supplemental insurance  to cover medical evacuation in the event of unforeseen medical complications.  
  • Your legal options in case of malpractice are very limited in Mexico.  Several foreigners have successfully enlisted the support of  PROFECO  (Spanish only) in order to resolve disputes over medical services.
  • Although Mexico has many elective/cosmetic surgery facilities that are on par with those found in the United States, the quality of care varies widely.  If you plan to undergo surgery in Mexico, make sure that emergency medical facilities are available and professionals are accredited and qualified.  

Pharmaceuticals

  • Exercise caution when purchasing medication overseas.  Pharmaceuticals, both over the counter and requiring prescription in the United States, are often readily available for purchase with little controls.  Counterfeit medication is common and may prove to be ineffective, the wrong strength, or contain dangerous ingredients.  Medication should be purchased in consultation with a medical professional and from reputable establishments.  
  • The Drug Enforcement Agency reports counterfeit prescription pills are sold by criminals on both sides of the border. These pills are sometimes represented as OxyContin, Percocet, Xanax, and others, and may contain deadly doses of fentanyl. Counterfeit pills are readily advertised on social media and can be purchased at small, non-chain pharmacies in Mexico along the border and in tourist areas.  U.S. citizens have become seriously ill or died in Mexico after using synthetic drugs or adulterated prescription pills.
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration are responsible for rules governing the transport of medication back to the United States.  Medication purchased abroad must meet their requirements to be legally brought back into the United States.  Medication should be for personal use and must be approved for usage in the United States.  Please visit the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Food and Drug Administration websites for more information.   
  • Visit the  Mexican Health Department  website (Spanish only) or contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information about obtaining a permit to import medicine into Mexico.
  • For a list of controlled substances in Mexico, visit the  COFEPRIS  website (Spanish only) and the  Mexican Drug Schedule  (Spanish only). U.S. citizens should carry a copy of their prescription or doctor’s letter, but it is still possible that they may be subject to arrest for arriving in Mexico with substances on these lists. Note that a medicine considered “over the counter” in some U.S. states may be a controlled substance in Mexico. For example, pseudoephedrine, the active ingredient in Sudafed, is considered a controlled substance in Mexico. For more information, contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C.

Assisted Reproductive Technology and Surrogacy  

  • If you are considering traveling to Mexico to have a child through use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) or surrogacy, please see our ART and Surrogacy Abroad page . 
  • Surrogacy is legal for foreigners in most of Mexico, in some states surrogacy is either not legal or is not governed by regulation. 
  • If you decide to pursue parenthood in Mexico via assisted reproductive technology (ART) with a gestational mother, be prepared for long and unexpected delays in documenting your child’s citizenship. 
  • Make sure you understand Mexican law, which can vary from state to state and is ambiguous in its treatment of non-Mexican or same-sex intending parents. Mexican courts, for example, may fail to enforce surrogacy agreements between non-Mexican or same-sex intending parents and gestational mothers.
  • Gestational mothers are normally treated as the child’s legal parent with full parental rights in most states. The gestational mother’s name is typically listed on the Mexican state-issued birth certificate.  In Mexico City, the intended parents may be listed on the Mexican birth certificate if they can demonstrate a valid surrogacy agreement was in place regarding the child’s birth.
  • Be aware that individuals who attempt to circumvent local law risk criminal prosecution.  Mexican authorities have made arrests stemming from surrogacy cases.

Carbon Monoxide

  • Many hotels and other lodgings are not equipped with carbon monoxide detectors, even if they contain sources of this potentially lethal gas. U.S. citizens have died as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning throughout Mexico. If your lodging is not equipped with a carbon monoxide detector, consider traveling with a portable one.

Water Quality: 

  • In many areas in Mexico, tap water is not potable. Bottled water and beverages are safe, although you should be aware that many restaurants and hotels serve tap water unless bottled water is specifically requested. Be aware that ice for drinks might be made using tap water.

Altitude: 

  • Many cities in Mexico, such as Mexico City, are at high altitude, which can lead to altitude illness. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about  Travel to High Altitudes .

Adventure Travel

  • Participation in adventure sports and activities may not be covered by accident insurance and safety protections and regulations for these activities may differ from U.S. standards.  Visit  our website  and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website  for more information about adventure travel.

General Health

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Typhoid Fever
  • Travelers’ Diarrhea
  • Chikungunya
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Parasitic Infections
  • Chronic Respiratory Disease
  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about Resources for Travelers regarding specific issues in Mexico.   

Air Quality

  • Air pollution is a significant problem in several major cities in Mexico. Consider the impact seasonal smog and heavy particulate pollution may have on you and consult your doctor before traveling if necessary.

For further health information, go to:

  Private Residential Treatment Facilities: 

  • These facilities provide care to U.S. citizens throughout Mexico and include child behavior modification facilities, rehabilitation facilities, and assisted living centers. 
  • There is a wide range in standards for education, safety, health, sanitation, immigration, and residency.  Staff licensing may not be strictly enforced or meet the standards of similar facilities in the United States.  
  • The State Department has received reports of abuse, negligence, or mismanagement at some of these facilities. U.S. citizens should exercise due diligence and do extensive research before selecting a residential treatment facility.

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Motor vehicle accidents are a leading cause of U.S. citizen deaths in Mexico. If you have an emergency while driving, dial “911.” If you are driving on a toll highway (“ cuota ”) or any other major highway, you may contact the Green Angels ( Spanish only ), a fleet of trucks with bilingual crews, by dialing 078 from any phone in Mexico.  Generally, individuals involved in an accident who do not require immediate medical care should contact their insurance providers, who may come to the site to provide an immediate assessment.

Avoid driving on Mexican highways at night. Travel with a charged and functional cell phone capable of making calls in Mexico. Travelers should exercise caution at all times and should use toll (“ cuota ”) roads rather than the less secure free (“ libre ”) roads whenever possible. Do not hitchhike or accept rides from or offer rides to strangers anywhere in Mexico. Travelers encountering police or security checkpoints should comply with instructions.

Road conditions and maintenance across Mexico vary with many road surfaces needing repair. Travel in rural areas poses additional risks to include spotty cell phone coverage and delays in receiving roadside or medical assistance.

Vehicular traffic in Mexico City is subject to restriction Monday through Saturday, according to the license plate number, in order to reduce air pollution. For additional information, refer to the  Hoy No Circula website  ( Spanish only ) maintained by the Mexico City government. See our  Road Safety Page  for more information.  Also, visit  Mexico’s national tourist office website , MexOnline, and Mexico’s customs website  Importacion Temporal de Vehiculos  ( Spanish only ) for more information regarding travel and transportation.

Traffic Laws:   U.S. driver’s licenses are valid in Mexico. Mexican law requires that only owners drive their vehicles or that the owner be inside the vehicle. Failing to abide by this law may lead to impoundment and a fine equal to the value of the vehicle.

Mexican citizens who are not also U.S. citizens or LPRs may not operate U.S.-registered vehicles in Mexico. Mexican insurance is required for all vehicles, including rental vehicles. Drivers involved in accidents, even minor incidents, may be subject to arrest if they are found to be driving without proper insurance, regardless of whether they were at fault. Driving under the influence of alcohol, using a mobile device while driving, and driving through a yellow light are all illegal in Mexico.

If you drive your vehicle into Mexico beyond the immediate border area (approximately 12 miles into Mexico), you must apply for a temporary vehicle import permit with Mexican customs, Banjercito , or at some Mexican consulates in the United States. The permit requires the presentation of a valid passport and a monetary deposit that will be returned to you upon leaving Mexico before the expiration of the permit. Failing to apply for a temporary vehicle import permit may lead to impoundment and a fine equal to the value of the vehicle. 

Vehicles crossing into Mexico must have a valid license plate and registration sticker. Mexican authorities will often refuse to admit vehicles with temporary or paper license plates. Vehicles with expired registration or unauthorized plates will likely be confiscated and the operator could be charged with a fine equal to the value of the vehicle.

The Mission Mexico Vehicle Recovery Unit  assists with the return of stolen U.S. vehicles recovered by Mexican authorities.

If you have an emergency while driving, dial “911.” If you are driving on a toll highway (“cuota”) or any other major highway, you may contact the Green Angels (Spanish only), a fleet of trucks with bilingual crews, by dialing 078 from any phone in Mexico.  Generally, individuals involved in an accident who do not require immediate medical care should contact their insurance providers, who may come to the site to provide an immediate assessment.

Public Transportation/Taxis:  Security on public buses varies throughout the country but is considered a relatively safe transportation option in Mexico City and other major tourist centers. Passengers should protect their personal possessions at all times as theft is common. Intercity bus travel should be conducted during daylight hours in preferably first-class buses using toll roads.

Robberies and assaults on passengers in taxis not affiliated with a taxi stand (known as “libre” taxis) are common. Avoid taking any taxi not summoned by telephone or contacted in advance, including “libre” taxis. When in need of a taxi, telephone a radio taxi or “sitio” (regulated taxi stand) and ask the dispatcher for the driver’s name and the taxi’s license plate number. Application-based car services such as Uber and Cabify are available in many Mexican cities, and generally offer another safe alternative to taxis. Official complaints against Uber and other drivers do occur, however, and past disputes between these services and local taxi unions have occasionally turned violent, resulting in injuries to U.S. citizens in some instances.

See our Road Safety page for more information. 

Aviation Safety Oversight:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Mexico’s Civil Aviation Authority as not being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Mexico’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to Mexico should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts .  Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website , and the NGA broadcast warnings .

If you enter by sea, review the Mexican boating permit requirements  prior to travel or contact the  Embassy of Mexico  in Washington, D.C., for more information.

Maritime Safety Oversight:  The Mexican maritime industry, including charter fishing and recreational vessels, is subject solely to Mexican safety regulations.  Travelers should be aware that Mexican equipment and vessels may not meet U.S. safety standards or be covered by any accident insurance.

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Mexico . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report.

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Zika virus: Advice for travellers

Level 2 - practise enhanced health precautions ( more details ).

Original publication date: January 28, 2014

Updated: August 31, 2023

  • The Current Situation and Health Professionals sections have been updated.

Current Situation

Zika virus continues to be a concern in many parts of the world. Transmission can occur in most areas of the world where the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the principal vector, occurs. This means that there is the potential for transmission through much of the tropical and subtropical world and beyond.

The risk of transmission to travellers is considered low.

To find out if your destination is a country or area with risk of Zika virus, consult the   Travel Advice and Advisories page , and select your destination. Information on diseases spread by insects, such as Zika virus, is found under the ‘Health’ tab.

Zika virus   typically causes mild illness lasting only a few days. Many people who are infected have no symptoms and do not know that they have been infected. Only 1 in 4 people infected with Zika virus develop symptoms.

Symptoms of Zika virus infection often include:

  • conjunctivitis (pink eye)
  • joint and muscle pain

A Zika virus infection in a pregnant woman can pose significant risks to the unborn baby, even if the woman does not develop any symptoms. Zika virus can cause   serious birth defects   including microcephaly (an abnormally small head), brain abnormalities, vision and hearing loss, and more. When some of these birth defects are present together, the condition is called Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS).

There have also been increased reports of a serious nervous system disorder in adults, called   Guillain-Barré syndrome , in countries and areas with risk of Zika virus.

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also spread by:

  • A pregnant woman infected with Zika virus passing the virus to her unborn baby.
  • A person infected with Zika virus passing the virus through sexual contact. This includes contact with semen, vaginal fluid, blood or other body fluids during vaginal, anal or oral sex without a condom. This may also include the sharing of sex toys.
  • A person infected with Zika virus who donates cells, blood, tissue, sperm (semen) or organs.

Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent or medication to treat infection with Zika virus. Symptoms, when present, will typically resolve on their own within a few days. Treatment aims to relieve symptoms.

Recommendations

For pregnant women or those planning a pregnancy

Zika virus infection during pregnancy   increases the risk for serious birth defects since women can pass the virus to their unborn babies.

Pregnant women and women planning a pregnancy should visit a health care professional at least 6 weeks before travelling to discuss the potential risks of travelling to a country or area with risk of Zika virus. Pregnant women may choose to avoid or postpone travel to these areas.

Zika virus can be sexually transmitted. Infected men with or without symptoms, can carry Zika virus in their semen for a prolonged period of time. Partners should be aware of the risk so they can make informed travel decisions and take appropriate precautions.

Pregnant women should always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact with anyone who has travelled to a country or area with risk of Zika virus for the duration of their pregnancy.

For all travellers to countries or areas with risk of Zika virus

Before your trip

  • Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic at least 6 weeks before you travel.

During your trip

  • Use   approved insect repellent   and apply it properly
  • Cover up   by wearing light-coloured, loose clothing, long pants and tucked-in long-sleeved shirts with closed-toe shoes or boots and a hat.
  • Sleep in indoor areas   that are completely enclosed or well-screened.
  • Use mosquito netting (bed net)   when sleeping outdoors or staying in a building that is not completely enclosed and to cover playpens, cribs or strollers.
  • Learn more about   mosquito bite prevention for travellers .
  • Always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact while in countries or areas with risk of Zika virus.

After your trip

  • See a health care professional if you had or currently have   symptoms of Zika virus infection .
  • Tell your health care professional:
  • where you have been living or travelling, and
  • if you have had unprotected sexual contact with someone who could be infected with Zika virus.
  • Always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact for   2 months after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer).
  • Before trying for a pregnancy,   wait   2 months   after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer) , to reduce the risk of passing the virus to your unborn baby. If your male partner travelled with you,   wait 3 months   after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer) ,   to reduce the risk of sexual transmission.
  • If you have a pregnant partner, always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact for the duration of the pregnancy.
  • Before trying for a pregnancy or donating semen,   wait 3 months   after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer) , to reduce the risk of sexual transmission.
  • In all other situations, always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact for   3 months after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer).

Information for Health Care Professionals

  • The Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT) has developed a statement on  Prevention and Treatment of Zika virus.
  • Zika virus: For health professionals

Registration of Canadians Abroad

Sign up with the  Registration of Canadians Abroad service to stay connected with the Government of Canada in case of an emergency abroad or an emergency at home.

  • World Health Organization - Zika virus classification tables
  • World Health Organization - Zika virus disease
  • Government of Canada – Zika virus
  • Safer condom use
  • If you become sick or injured while travelling outside Canada or after your return

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zika travel advisory mexico

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad
  • Foreign travel advice

Warnings and insurance

zika travel advisory mexico

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) provides advice about risks of travel to help British nationals make informed decisions. Find out more about FCDO travel advice .

Areas where FCDO advises against all but essential travel

Your travel insurance could be invalidated if you travel against FCDO advice. Consular support is also severely limited where FCDO advises against travel.

State of Baja California

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the city of Tijuana, except:

  • airside transit through Tijuana airport
  • the Cross Border Xpress bridge from the airport linking terminals across the Mexican-US border
  • the federal toll road 1D and Via Rápida through Tijuana to the border

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the city of Tecate in Baja California (including roads between Tijuana and Tecate)

Note: FCDO does not advise against all travel or all but essential travel to any part of the state of Baja California Sur.

State of Chihuahua

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Chihuahua, except:

  • the city of Chihuahua
  • the border crossing in Ciudad Juárez (accessed by federal toll road 45)
  • federal toll road 45D connecting the cities of Chihuahua and Ciudad Juárez
  • the Copper Canyon rail route to and from Chihuahua and towns immediately on this route including Creel
  • the road from Creel via San Juanito to San Pedro
  • state highway 16 from San Pedro to Chihuahua

State of Colima

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Colima, except:

  • the city of Manzanillo accessed by sea or air via the Manzanillo-Costalegre International Airport

State of Guanajuato

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the areas southwest of road 45D.

State of Guerrero

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Guerrero, except:

  • the town of Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa accessed by air
  • the town of Taxco accessed by the 95D and 200D federal toll roads

State of Jalisco

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the areas south and southwest of Lake Chapala to the border with the state of Colima.

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the northern municipalities of:

  • Chimaltitán
  • Hostotipaquillo
  • Huequilla el Alto
  • San Martin de Bolaños
  • Santa Maria de los Ángeles
  • Villa Guerrero

State of Michoacán

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Michoacán, except:

  • the city of Morelia accessed by federal toll roads 15D, 126 and 43; and the federal toll road 48D between the city of Morelia and the General Francisco Mujica airport
  • the town of Pátzcuaro accessed by federal toll roads 14D and 15 from Morelia, and boat trips out to islands on Lake Pátzcuaro
  • the Federal Highway 15D

State of Sinaloa

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Sinaloa, except:

  • the cities of Los Mochis and Mazatlán
  • road 32 that runs between El Fuerte and Los Mochis
  • the 15D federal toll road that runs the length of the state
  • the Copper Canyon rail route to and from Los Mochis, El Fuerte and the towns immediately on this route

State of Tamaulipas

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Tamaulipas, except:

  • the border crossing at Nuevo Laredo accessed by federal toll road 85D from Monterrey

State of Zacatecas

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the state of Zacatecas.

Find out more about why FCDO advises against travel to these areas .

Hurricane Otis

Hurricane Otis hit the south coast of Mexico around Acapulco as a Category 5 hurricane on 25 October. Hurricane Otis caused significant damage to infrastructure in Acapulco and along Mexico’s southern coast between Zihuatenejo and Punta Maldonado. There continues to be disruption to tourism while reconstruction efforts are ongoing and the security situation is unpredictable. The Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office advises against all but essential travel to the city of Acapulco.

For more information, see  Hurricanes .

Before you travel

No travel can be guaranteed safe. Read all the advice in this guide and any specific travel advice that applies to you: 

  • women travellers  
  • disabled travellers  
  • LGBT+ travellers

Follow and contact FCDO travel on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram . You can also sign up to get email notifications when this advice is updated.

Travel insurance

If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance . Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency.

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Pregnant? Read this before you travel.

Pregnant? Read this before you travel.

English pdf icon [PDF – 9 MB]

CDC’s Response to ZIKA PREGNANT? READ THIS BEFORE YOU TRAVEL

What we know about Zika

  • Zika can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus.
  • Infection during pregnancy can cause certain birth defects.
  • These mosquitoes are aggressive daytime biters. They can also bite at night.
  • The large outbreak in the Americas is over, but Zika continues to be a potential risk in many countries in the Americas and around the world.
  • There is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat Zika.
  • Zika can be passed through sex from a person who has Zika to his or her sex partners.

What we don’t know about Zika

  • If there’s a safe time during your pregnancy to travel to an area with risk of Zika.
  • How likely it is that Zika will pass to your fetus.
  • Whether your baby will have birth defects.

Symptoms of Zika

Many people won’t have symptoms or even know they are infected with the virus. The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.

The most common symptoms of Zika are

  • Muscle pain

Travel Notice

CDC has issued a travel notice (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to areas with a Zika outbreak.

For a current list of places with risk of Zika virus, see CDC’s Travel Health website: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-information

Zika can also be sexually transmitted from an infected person to his or her male or female partners, so travelers should use condoms.

  • Do not travel to areas with a Zika outbreak (red areas on the Zika map ). Before travel to other areas with risk of Zika (purple areas on the Zika map), pregnant women should talk with their doctors and carefully consider risks and possible consequences of travel.
  • If you must travel to these areas, talk to your doctor first and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites during your trip.
  • If you have a partner who lives in or has traveled to an area with risk of Zika, either use condoms the right way every time you have vaginal, oral, or anal sex, or do not have sex during the pregnancy.

Trying to become pregnant?

  • Before you travel to areas with a Zika outbreak (red areas on the Zika map) or other areas with risk of Zika (purple areas on the Zika map), talk to your doctor about your plans to become pregnant and the potential risks and possible consequences of travel.
  • Strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites and sexual transmission during your trip.

Before you travel, check the CDC travel website frequently for the most up-to-date recommendations. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/Travel

Your Best Protection: Prevent Mosquito Bites

When used as directed, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.
  • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
  • Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.

Indoor Protection

  • Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if air conditioned or screened rooms are not available or if sleeping outdoors.

Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents. When used as directed, these insect repellents are safe and effective for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

  • Always follow the product label instructions.
  • Reapply as directed.
  • Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.
  • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.
  • Use a repellent with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone.

Exit Notification / Disclaimer Policy

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
  • Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
  • You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.
  • CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

Mexico Travel Concierge

Is it safe to travel to Mexico (2023) with Zika?

  • July 29, 2023

I. Introduction

Mexico, with its rich culture, vibrant cities, and stunning landscapes, has long been a popular travel destination. However, like any other destination, it is crucial for travelers to stay informed about any potential health risks before embarking on their journey. One such concern in recent years has been the Zika virus. In this article, we will explore the topic of traveling to Mexico and the Zika virus. We will provide up-to-date information, assess the safety of traveling to Mexico amidst the Zika virus, and offer preventive measures to minimize any potential risks.

II. Understanding the Keyword: “travel to Mexico Zika virus”

When considering a vacation to Mexico, it is essential to be aware of any health risks associated with the destination, including the Zika virus. The Zika virus is a mosquito-borne disease that is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. Symptoms of Zika infection can include fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis. However, the concerning aspect of Zika is its potential to cause birth defects in babies born to infected mothers.

III. Importance of Providing Information about Zika and Travel to Mexico

Providing accurate and up-to-date information about the Zika virus and travel to Mexico is crucial for several reasons. Firstly, it helps travelers make informed decisions regarding their travel plans. By understanding the potential risks and taking appropriate precautions, travelers can minimize their chances of contracting the virus. Secondly, disseminating information helps alleviate unnecessary panic and fear surrounding the virus. It is important to remember that with proper knowledge and preventive measures, the risk of contracting Zika can be significantly reduced.

IV. Latest Updates on Traveling to Mexico in 2023 with Zika

As of 2023, the Zika virus remains a concern in Mexico. While the number of reported cases has significantly decreased since its peak in 2016, there are still sporadic cases being reported in different regions of Mexico. It is essential to stay updated on the latest travel advisories issued by health organizations and government agencies. These advisories will provide valuable information on areas of concern, recommendations for pregnant travelers, and updates on preventive measures.

V. Assessing the Safety of Traveling to Mexico with Zika

Assessing the safety of traveling to Mexico with Zika requires considering various factors such as the individual’s health, the location within Mexico, and the season. For most non-pregnant individuals, the Zika virus presents minimal risk and typically results in mild symptoms resembling those of a common flu. However, pregnant women, or those planning to become pregnant, should exercise extra caution as the virus can have severe consequences for unborn babies.

It is advisable to consult with healthcare professionals, such as your primary care physician or a travel medicine specialist, before traveling to Mexico. They can provide personalized advice based on your specific circumstances and help you make an informed decision about your travel plans. Additionally, staying updated on local news and advisories can provide valuable insights into the current Zika situation in Mexico.

VI. Potential Health Risks Associated with Zika in Mexico

While the Zika virus generally causes mild symptoms in non-pregnant individuals, it is crucial to be aware of the potential health risks associated with Zika in Mexico. The greatest concern is for pregnant women or those planning to become pregnant, as Zika infection during pregnancy can lead to severe birth defects, including microcephaly. It is recommended that pregnant women postpone travel to areas with ongoing Zika transmission.

For individuals who are not pregnant, the risk of complications from Zika is low. However, it is still essential to protect oneself from mosquito bites by using insect repellents, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying in accommodations with screens or air conditioning.

VII. Preventive Measures to Minimize Zika Risks while Traveling to Mexico

When traveling to Mexico, there are several preventive measures you can take to minimize your risk of contracting the Zika virus:

1. Use Insect Repellents: Apply EPA-registered insect repellents that contain either DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE), or para-menthane-diol (PMD) to exposed skin and clothing.

2. Wear Protective Clothing: Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks, and shoes.

3. Stay in Screened or Air-Conditioned Accommodations: Choose accommodations with screens on windows and doors, or with air conditioning, to minimize exposure to mosquitoes.

4. Avoid Peak Mosquito Activity: Mosquitoes that transmit Zika are most active during early morning and late afternoon. Minimize outdoor activities during these times or take extra precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

5. Remove Standing Water: Mosquitoes breed in standing water, so empty, clean, or cover any containers or areas where water may collect.

6. Practice Safe Sexual Practices: Zika can also be transmitted through sexual contact. If you or your partner have recently traveled to an area with Zika, it is advisable to practice safe sex or abstain from sexual activity for a specified period, as recommended by healthcare professionals.

VIII. Travel Advisories and Guidelines for Mexico in 2023

When planning a trip to Mexico in 2023, it is vital to stay informed about travel advisories and guidelines issued by reputable sources. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly update their recommendations based on the current Zika situation in Mexico.

These recommendations may include guidelines for pregnant women, advice on preventive measures, and areas of concern within Mexico. Travelers should also pay attention to any advisories issued by their own country’s health department or travel agencies.

IX. Conclusion

In conclusion, while the Zika virus remains a concern in Mexico, it is crucial to approach the topic with knowledge and caution rather than fear. By staying informed about the latest updates on traveling to Mexico with Zika, assessing the safety based on individual circumstances, understanding the potential health risks, and taking preventive measures, travelers can have a safe and enjoyable experience in Mexico. It is always advisable to consult with healthcare professionals and heed the recommendations of health organizations and government advisories.

Remember, viewing Mexico’s must-see destinations from a helicopter can be an awe-inspiring experience. It provides a unique perspective and allows you to fully appreciate the beauty of the country. So, don’t forget to consider a helicopter tour to add that extra touch of adventure to your Mexican vacation.

FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

1. is it safe to travel to mexico with the zika virus.

For most individuals, traveling to Mexico with the Zika virus presents minimal risk, as symptoms are usually mild and flu-like. However, pregnant women or those planning to become pregnant should exercise caution, as Zika can lead to severe birth defects. It is recommended that pregnant women postpone travel to areas with ongoing Zika transmission.

2. How can I protect myself from Zika while traveling to Mexico?

To protect yourself from Zika while in Mexico, it is essential to use insect repellents, wear protective clothing (long sleeves, long pants), seek accommodations with screens or air conditioning, avoid peak mosquito activity times, and remove standing water. It is also important to practice safe sexual practices, as Zika can be transmitted through sexual contact.

3. Where can I find the latest travel advisories and guidelines for Mexico?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly update their recommendations for traveling to Mexico with Zika. It is advisable to visit their respective websites for the most up-to-date information. Additionally, your country’s health department or travel agencies may issue specific advisories and guidelines for Mexican travel.

4. Should I consult a healthcare professional before traveling to Mexico?

Consulting a healthcare professional before traveling to Mexico is highly recommended, especially for pregnant women or those planning to become pregnant. They can provide personalized advice based on your specific circumstances and help you assess the risks associated with Zika. Additionally, they can offer guidance on preventive measures and address any concerns you may have.

5. Can I still have an enjoyable trip to Mexico while taking precautions against Zika?

Yes, taking precautions against Zika does not have to dampen your experience in Mexico. By staying informed, using preventive measures, and following the recommendations of healthcare professionals and travel advisories, you can have a safe and enjoyable trip to Mexico. Mexico offers a wealth of cultural experiences, beautiful landscapes, and delicious cuisine that can still be fully enjoyed while minimizing the risks associated with Zika.

Are you planning a trip to Mexico? At Mexico Travel Concierge, we offer a comprehensive range of services to make your trip a memorable one. From helping you find the best flights to providing personalized tour recommendations, accommodations, and transportation, our experienced team is here to assist you every step of the way. Visit our website for more information and start planning your perfect Mexican getaway today!

Help Me Concierge

Tincho

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  1. The Zika Virus in Mexico

    zika travel advisory mexico

  2. The Zika Virus in Mexico: What You Need to Know

    zika travel advisory mexico

  3. What you should know about the Zika Virus in Mexico

    zika travel advisory mexico

  4. The Zika Virus in Mexico: What You Need to Know

    zika travel advisory mexico

  5. Travel Advisory Map Mexico

    zika travel advisory mexico

  6. The Zika Virus in Mexico: What You Need to Know

    zika travel advisory mexico

COMMENTS

  1. Zika Travel Information

    PDF version of the map (printable) Zika Travel Recommendations by Traveler Type and Country Category Know before you go! Zika continues to be a problem in many parts of the world. There is no vaccine to prevent infection. Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito ( Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus ).

  2. Current Zika Virus Situation in Mexico: 2023 Update

    Various travel advisories have been issued by health organizations and governments around the world regarding the Zika virus in Mexico. These advisories provide important information and guidelines for travelers to follow.

  3. Mexico Travel Advisory

    Travel Advisory August 22, 2023 See State Summaries K C Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links. Country Summary: Violent crime - such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery - is widespread and common in Mexico.

  4. Is Mexico Safe for Travel in 2023? Zika Virus Guidelines

    You can find the latest travel advisories for Mexico on your home country's government websites, such as the U.S. Department of State or the Canadian Government Travel Advisory. ... Prev Previous Stay Informed: 2023 Mexico Travel Zika Guide. Next Current Zika Virus Situation in Mexico 2023 Next. On Key Related Posts. Mexican Hospitality at ...

  5. The Zika Virus in Mexico: What You Need to Know

    Mexico has, and continues to take, steps to prevent the spread of the Zika virus infection through public service announcements, campaigns and preventive travel advisories and warnings. Mexico's Epidemiological Surveillance System is fully prepared to recognize and diagnose infections by the Zika virus.

  6. Zika Virus

    Since 2018, no local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission has been reported in the continental United States. If you are traveling outside of the continental United States, see Zika Travel Information to learn about your destination.. Prevent mosquito bites when traveling:. Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent to protect yourself and your family from mosquito ...

  7. 2023 Zika Travel Update: What You Need to Know

    VI. Conclusion In conclusion, it is paramount to stay informed about the Zika virus situation in Mexico before planning your trip. By following preventive measures, staying updated on travel advisories and warnings, and making informed decisions, you can minimize the risk of Zika virus infection and enjoy a safe and memorable vacation in Mexico.

  8. Travel advice and advisories for Mexico

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  9. CDC makes notable exception to Zika travel warning

    The U.S. government revised its Zika travel warnings Friday, saying it's OK for pregnant women to travel to Mexico City and other places at high elevation in outbreak regions.

  10. Zika Virus

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    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

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    To find out if your destination is a country or area with risk of Zika virus, consult the Travel Advice and Advisories page, and select your destination. Information on diseases spread by insects, such as Zika virus, is found under the 'Health' tab. Zika virus. Zika virus typically causes mild illness lasting only a few days. Many people ...

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    20 November 2023 Latest update: Information on Acapulco following Hurricane Otis ('Warnings and insurance' page) Download a more detailed map (PDF) The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office...

  17. Is it safe to travel to Mexico in 2023 with the Zika virus?

    The safety of traveling to Mexico in 2023 depends on various factors, including the current situation with the Zika virus. The Mexican government and health authorities have been actively working to control and prevent the spread of Zika. They have implemented measures such as mosquito control programs and public awareness campaigns.

  18. Pregnant? Read this before you travel.

    CDC has issued a travel notice (Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions) for people traveling to areas with a Zika outbreak. For a current list of places with risk of Zika virus, see CDC's Travel Health website: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-information

  19. Is it safe to travel to Mexico (2023) with Zika?

    We will provide up-to-date information, assess the safety of traveling to Mexico amidst the Zika virus, and offer preventive measures to minimize any potential risks. II. Understanding the Keyword: "travel to Mexico Zika virus"