Don’t Slip Up: Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls to Keep Patients and Hospital Staff Safer

Slips, trips and falls (STFs) can happen anywhere, and hospitals are no exception. Whether in a patient room or an operating room, STFs are a potentially costly and largely preventable risk to both patients and hospital staff alike.

Falls are of particular concern with patients over the age of 65, who make up the  vast majority of hospitalized patients . According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls among older adults are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among people over 65. In 2014,  29 million older Americans  experienced a fall, with around 800,000 requiring a hospital stay. There is also the risk of patients falling while they’re in the hospital. The  Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality  (AHRQ) estimates that between 700,000 and 1 million hospitalized patients fall each year.

When patients slip, trip or fall in the hospital, there are reimbursement implications. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) classifies death or serious injury from a fall while being cared for by a healthcare facility as a “never event,” meaning they do not reimburse additional costs related to falls. And the cost is not insignificant. According to the CDC, the  average cost for a fall  is more than $30,000, with total medical costs related to falls estimated at more than $50 billion. Research has also shown that falling once doubles the chances of a person experiencing  another fall , so if a patient enters the hospital because of a fall, the odds of them falling while in the hospital are even higher, placing increased risk to the patient’s outcome and experience, as well as burden on the hospital staff caring for them.

Luckily, by combining a concerted effort to follow available guidelines and incorporating the right equipment and training for clinicians, it is possible to reduce the number of falls experienced by patients.

Reducing patient STFs

Hospitals are places where vulnerable patients come to receive the best, safest care possible. Patients enter for many reasons, and while there, everything must be done to ensure their needs and regulators’ expectations are met.

While the factors contributing to falls are unique to each patient, according to an analysis of the Joint Commission’s Sentinel Event database on falls with injury, the most common factors that contribute to STFs include:

  • Inadequate assessment
  • Communication failures
  • Lack of adherence to protocols and safety practices
  • Inadequate staff orientation, supervision, staffing levels or skill mix
  • Deficiencies in the physical environment
  • Lack of leadership

There is extensive research focused on quality improvement efforts aimed at reducing the number of falls in a hospital.

According to industry accreditors and research agencies, including the Joint Commission and AHRQ, best practices hospitals should follow to reduce falls and falls-related injuries include:

( See Related )

  • Raise awareness broadly:  The responsibility for identifying and monitoring fall risks in patients does not fall squarely on nurses. Hospitals should use a multidisciplinary approach for intervention that includes clinical and non-clinical staff at every level. Form an interdisciplinary falls prevention team, and consider appointing an executive sponsor who is empowered to ensure adequate equipment and resources are available to set hospital staff up for success.
  • Use tools and a tailored approach:  Not all patients, including ones identified as a fall risk, have the same needs. Therefore, an individualized care plan that’s responsive to differing risk factors, needs, and preferences, should be implemented. It’s important that someone perform a comprehensive, individualized assessment for falls and injury risk on a patient. It’s also a good idea to use a standardized tool to identify fall risk factors, such as the Morse Fall Scale, and have it integrated into your hospital’s electronic health record, if possible.
  • Ensure proper training:  The best approach to preventing falls starts with having the right information. To that end, make sure staff have undergone training and understand the best protocol to prevent STFs, and, if using a tool like the Morse Fall Scale, ensure they’re trained on it. If possible, be sure the training and patient education is structured and comes from health professionals rather than being provided ad hoc.
  • Have the right equipment:  Some STFs can take place because of fluid on the floor or a generally slippery floor surface. It’s not enough to give patients advice on safe footwear. Providing them with safe footwear that has grips can help when they are up and mobile, whether on their own or with the assistance of a hospital worker, can help. Equipment can also help with continence management, including offering frequent assistance with toilet routines. Having the right equipment, such as a commode, available can encourage more mobility.
  • Look at prescriptions:  Another way to reduce falls is through clinical interventions, which can include medication management. As part of an assessment, review and, if medically appropriate, consider discontinuing medications associated with increased risk of falls, especially psychotropic or deliriogenic medication.
  • Help patients help themselves:  By providing early access to medical advice on fall prevention, mobility aids such as canes or walkers, and, if medically cleared, exercise with a physiotherapist, hospital staff can boost a patient’s confidence and strength, which can help prevent future falls.
  • Conduct post-fall management:  A patient falling in a hospital can provide staff a valuable learning opportunity. To learn from the incident, assemble a huddle comprised of staff at all levels to discuss what, how and why the fall happened and what steps can be taken in the future to prevent it. Encourage a culture of open and honest reporting, so staff feel empowered to come forward with information. Analyze the falls data and look for trends that can be addressed proactively.

Related Article

Stfs and hospital staff.

Patients are not the only people in hospitals at risk of experiencing a STF. While it is the job of healthcare workers to protect and care for their patients, they, too, are at risk. According to the  Bureau of Labor and Statistics , the incidence rate of lost-workday injuries as a result of STFs in hospitals was 90% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined. STFs are the second leading cause of lost-workday injuries in hospitals.

The leading cause of STFs  for hospital staff is contaminants such as water, grease, bodily fluids or food being present on the floor. Whether in a patient room or an operating room, a slippery floor poses a significant risk. According to the CDC, steps hospitals can take to reduce STFs related to debris on the floor include:

  • Have an established housekeeping program:  Make the program available to all employees, and have it include information such as how to contact housekeeping staff, where wet floor signs are located and how to place them, and what cleaning methods are appropriate for different surfaces.
  • Know your environment:  Different areas of hospitals pose different STF risks. For example, ORs present unique challenges for preventing STFs as there is a lot of equipment, some of which has cords, space is limited and there is the presence of a variety of liquids including blood, saline and oils. STFs in the OR can cause patient harm, disrupt the procedure, contribute to surgical errors or delay a surgery, throwing off the surgical schedule for that OR.
  • Map products to the environment:  When developing an STF reduction program for your hospital, consider elements such as slip-resistant floor surfaces, slip-resistant footwear and contaminant control for liquid spills. In the OR specifically, consider products such as colored markings on equipment that pose a trip risk and slip-resistant mats. When choosing a slip-resistant mat, ensure that it’s highly absorbent with a wide range of materials. Additionally, aim for solutions that are easy to clean up and disposable, as that will help to mitigate the risk of cross contamination that is possible with a product that is laundered and reused.

A comprehensive STF program at a hospital is one that includes education, clarity, protocol, teamwork, the right equipment, and measures for continuous improvement. Adhering to the measures outlined in this article will help your hospital start or continue down the road to a safer space for both patients and those responsible for their care.

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Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Outpatient Setting: Strategies to Prevent and Address Patient Injury at Medical Offices

hospital in trips

While hospital staff’s vigilance about preventing patient falls is well-known, the record with outpatient practices is less clear. Fall risk prevention strategies typically used in hospitals are often impractical for the medical office setting, and there is limited information about relevant mitigation tactics. Nonetheless, slips, trips, and falls pose a significant risk within outpatient facilities. By understanding the risks associated with patient falls and identifying effective prevention strategies, practice leaders can protect patients against unnecessary injury and protect their practice against undue liability.

Addressing the Risk

Of course, patient safety is of the utmost importance in all medical settings, and slips, trips, and falls pose significant risk to patient well-being. Given this risk, fall prevention should be a component of every medical facility’s risk management and patient safety initiatives, and it’s important to adopt strategies that are both practical and effective for outpatient facilities.

Practice leaders should begin by identifying hazards within the facility that could cause a potential fall, such as equipment blocking hallways, high examination tables, or slippery surfaces, and remove obstacles where possible. Practice staff should also be trained on how to identify patients who are at highest risk for falls, as well as the most common circumstances leading to falls, such as transferring to and from wheelchairs, immediately following venipuncture, or while patients are unattended at exam tables. By setting formal training and procedures for fall prevention, practices can avoid much of the risk from patient falls.

Practice Liability

Laws around liability for slips, trips, and falls within a medical practice are complex and vary by state. Typically, these incidents are unrelated to the reason the patient is seeking treatment, making it more likely for a fall to result in a premises liability claim against the property owner. However, if a fall occurs while a patient is receiving treatment, the claim may be categorized as a malpractice claim. Thorough investigation of the circumstances leading up to and during the incident is critical to understanding the cause of the fall and building a strong defense to protect the practice against undue liability. To that end, we suggest that practices establish clear policies for investigating falls and train staff on how to handle these situations by performing fall-focused physical examinations, obtaining witness statements, and maintaining thorough documentation, including incident reports and investigation forms.

Curi members can click here to access our new Fall Prevention Toolkit, featuring actionable advice and resource documents, including detailed case studies, an environmental checklist, and a sample investigation policy that can help practices build a comprehensive fall prevention strategy. If you have any questions about this topic, please call 800-662-7917 to speak with one of Curi Advisory’s Risk Solutions experts.

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Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers

December 2010, dhhs (niosh) publication number 2011-123.

cover of 2011-120

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics [2009], the incidence rate of lost-workday injuries from slips, trips, and falls (STFs) on the same level in hospitals was 38.2 per 10,000 employees, which was 90% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined (20.1 per 10,000 employees). STFs as a whole are the second most common cause of lost-workday injuries in hospitals.

Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers [PDF 979.73KB]

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  • v.7(2); Mar-Apr 2022

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Slips, Trips, and Falls: A Quality Improvement Initiative

Gene h. peir.

From the 1 Children’s National Hospital, Washington, D.C.

2 George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC.

Nick Mantasas

Jenhao j. cheng, katherine worten, rahul k. shah, associated data, introduction:.

Employee safety and the reduction of Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred are a focus of the Solutions for Patient Safety Network. One significant contributor to the Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred rate at Children’s National Hospital is employee slips, trips, or falls.

Children’s National Hospital implemented a multidisciplinary quality improvement with executive leadership vision and support. We implemented quality techniques (including Key Driver Diagrams, Pareto Charts, and continuous Plan-Do-Study-Act) and designed novel Environmental Services interventions.

Children’s National Hospital achieved a 44.3% reduction in monthly average reported slips, trips, or fall events from baseline and sustained over a 2-year study period.

Conclusion:

A leadership-driven multidisciplinary approach to quality initiatives with team leaders capable of making and enacting real-time policy changes led to novel interventions and a successful reduction of employee slips, trips, and falls events over time, which are broadly generalizable.

INTRODUCTION

Employee safety has trailed advances in patient safety. In the late 1980s, Paul O’Neill revolutionized employee safety by creating a system for reporting accidents and injuries and analyzing root causes to identify deficiencies. He believed and ultimately proved that a focus on employee safety would increase overall productivity and profitability. 1 , 2 In healthcare, serious, nonfatal workplace injuries total 2 billion dollars nationwide in workers’ compensation, with 6.8 work-related injuries and illnesses for every 100 full-time employees in 2011. 3 Groups such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement have credited Mr. O’Neill for establishing the basic tenants of employee safety that continue to guide their philosophy today. 4 The Children’s Hospital’s Solutions for Patient Safety (SPS) Network includes 145+ member hospitals working together to eliminate serious harm across all children’s hospitals. 5 Excitingly, SPS partnered with and consulted with Mr. O’Neill to draw employee and staff safety in hospitals to the forefront of their work. As a result, SPS formally launched the work on employee and staff safety in 2016, where quality and safety leaders came together to accomplish several objectives, which included: creating awareness of the scientific evidence linking employee/staff safety to patient safety, reviewing best practices from other industries related to employee/staff safety work, and presenting and recommending SPS Network-wide goals. 6 One of the stated goals of the SPS collaborative is to achieve a 25% reduction in network Employee/Staff Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred rate, 6 a safety metric tracked by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 3 SPS recognizes Slips, Trips, and Falls as a focus area contributing to the overall Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred rate. 6

Previously published works have demonstrated the success of leadership-driven programs to improve patient safety and eliminate preventable harm. For example, Nationwide Children’s in 2008 developed the “Zero Hero” program to provide a face to their message of improving patient safety. 7 In 2017, following the footprint established by other institutions, Children’s National Hospital’s President and Chief Executive Officer, along with the Board of Directors and Executive Leadership encouraged and supported management to launch a centralized, hospital-wide Employee and Staff Safety (ESS) Program 8 to create a safer work environment for employees and decrease the institutional Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred rate, which at 1.48 8 was above the national benchmark of 1.15. 9 The group reviewed baseline data and identified five employee injury focus areas based on the frequency of events and staff most vulnerable to harm. The focus areas included sharps injuries, blood and body fluid exposure, workplace violence, slips, trips, falls, and overexertion injuries. 8 We have previously reported on the success of our broad employee staff safety work to create a safer work environment. 7

The prior article was overarching; it demonstrated the role of a system-wide programmatic effort to tackle the problem of employee staff safety and addressed sharps injuries, blood and body fluid exposures, workplace violence, overexertion, and slips, trips, and falls from a macro perspective. 8 The current report details the specific quality improvement initiative aimed to decrease the number of slips/trips/falls by 20% initially in the first 6 months of FY 18 and sustain for 1 year within Children’s National Hospital owned and operated facilities. The group chose a target of 20% as an attainable goal to target in the first 6 months. Anecdotally, it has become apparent that hospitals struggle in specific focus areas under the employee staff-safety work. Therefore, it is imperative to present shared learnings in this area of the employee staff-safety work. The results demonstrate the institutional leadership and multidisciplinary approach required to make significant improvements to employee safety, acknowledging that this work is generalizable within an organization’s employee safety operations other organizations.

This project was deemed exempt from Institutional Review Board approval as a quality improvement project. Children’s National Hospital, located in Washington, DC, is an urban, tertiary-care, 323-bed free-standing academic children’s hospital, with approximately 8000 employees.

The quality and safety initiatives at Children’s National Hospital have undergone many iterations, starting in 2006 and again embarking on the second iteration in 2012. 10 The framework in 2014 for patient safety led to significant organizational improvements in patient safety and quality. As a result, executive leadership challenged the organization to create similar employee and staff safety processes. Initially, the Employee and Staff Safety Steering (ESS) Committee 8 was created, tasked with advancing the safety culture at Children’s National Hospital, and reducing harm to employees. The multidisciplinary committee, chaired by the Vice President, Chief Quality and Safety Officer, and the Vice President, Chief Risk Officer, included representatives from Risk Management, Patient Safety, Workers’ Compensation, Nursing, Security, Environmental Services (EVS), Occupational Health, Human Resources, and Performance Improvement. As described previously, 8 the group highlighted five employee injury focus areas based on the frequency of events and staff most vulnerable to harm: sharps injury, blood, and body fluid exposure, workplace violence, slips/trips/falls, and overexertion. In addition, the committee chose team leads based on expertise and appropriate oversight for instituting change in real-time to address each area.

The ESS Committee named the Environmental Services (EVS) Director team lead of the slips/trips/falls focus area; team members included EVS managers and supervisor. The safety and quality team provided support, guidance, and insight. The team followed OHSA definitions: slip is the lack of traction between footwear and walking surface; a trip impedes lower extremity movement. A fall is a total loss of balance from the same or lower level. 3 Before inclusion in the data, the team leader carefully reviewed and evaluated the events. Ongoing injury data came from safety event reports, Occupational Health records, and Worker’s Compensation events.

At Children’s National Hospital, the ESS slips/trips/falls subgroup performed baseline analysis and identified 91 injury incidents in FY 2017. The team created a Pareto chart (Fig. ​ (Fig.1) 1 ) to categorize the areas of injury for intervention. In addition, they created key driver diagrams ( see figure 1, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/PQ9/A369 ) through data analysis, review of best practices, and staff feedback. The group met quarterly to assess intervention success; the team analyzed Pareto charts and developed subsequent Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles based on data gathered for the previous quarter. In addition, the EVS team met weekly to provide immediate feedback to the group leader.

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Pareto chart FY 2017, slips/trips/falls

Based on initial data, wet floors caused 41% of slips, trips, and falls. Next, the team investigated individual cases and identified several areas for improvement and intervention (Table ​ (Table1). 1 ). First, the team installed large moisture mats at all transition points and extended outward and inward following PDSA re-evaluation to address entrances. Second, EVS placed stands with plastic bags strategically at main entrances; security officers instructed visitors to use those bags on PDSA re-evaluation. Third, we aggressively placed wet floor signage surrounding select high-traffic restroom areas. Additionally, we installed push button alert technology to report unsafe conditions in these areas. When pressed by the user, the button alerts the EVS staff to an area requiring attention, allowing faster response time. Finally, elevator areas utilized more mats and signage for transition points.

Wet Floor Injury Areas of Focus

In areas of active EVS cleaning, we implemented multiple interventions over several PDSA cycles. Initially, EVS workers placed wet floor signage at either end of the work area. Despite the signage, staff continued to enter work areas unintentionally through the alternative entrance and exit points within the work. EVS subsequently proceeded to rope off the entire work area, preventing this phenomenon. In addition, EVS informed the charge nurses of pending work to alert bedside staff in clinical areas. Finally, in addressing elevators, the EVS staff partnered with the security department to stop and rope off active areas until floors were dry to minimize the chances of injury.

The team launched the “Lid On” campaign to promote using lids on drink containers and saran wrap to cover all food and drink products, leaving the cafeteria area to address cafeteria slips. In addition, Saran wrap stations were increased and made more visible, and wet floor signs were proactively placed around the cafeteria to bring attention to the high-risk areas.

Other Areas

Obstacles causing injury were primarily parking garage speed bumps and uneven ground trips. We addressed these obstacles by painting the speed bumps bright yellow to make them more noticeable addressed old areas of uneven pavement. During the winter months, outdoor weather conditions related to icy conditions were especially prevalent at various outpatient outreach centers. These centers mainly were properties that the organization did not own; instead, they were leased. To address this, the group proactively reached out to landlords to request the salting of sidewalks before the known risk of snow and ice buildup. On the institutional campus, EVS proactively salted outdoor areas before the risk of snow and ice. The balance category included instances of injury where a review identified no modifiable cause, and the reason for the slip was human error.

Injury Prevention Kits

To augment the specific interventions, the EVS installed multiple “kits” to assist staff in high-risk areas to minimize the possibility of injury. The first was a “Spill Kit.” This kit consisted of rapidly deployable wet floor signs and absorbent pads to soak up wet areas until EVS staff arrived at the scene. In addition, the welcome desk staff deployed this kit at major entrances when necessary.

To address injury within the EVS staff during cleaning, we created a “Floor Care Kit.” When deployed to an area of interest, it included a checklist of items: nonslip shoe covers, wet floor signs, absorbent pads, caution tape, gloves, painter’s tape, and a mop head.

Organizational Awareness

In 2018, Children’s National Hospital launched a “Your Safety Matters Too” campaign to raise awareness of organizational commitment to reducing employee harm, similar to the concept established by the “Zero Harm” campaign. 7 Team leads and the ESS Steering Committee regularly rounded with staff to raise awareness. The Daily Check-In safety briefing incorporated reports on injury or safety events to increase awareness and escalate concerns. In addition, we integrated ESS content into new hire training, which ensured that all new staff, including select vendors, coming into the organization understood the importance of employee safety and the processes in place to minimize injury.

Statistical Analysis

A statistical process control c-chart tracked the monthly number of safety events and informed the progress. We started the process improvement in June 2018 using Nelson’s Shift Rule. 11 We use data points following the new process implementation to calculate a new centerline. We apply the Pareto Chart, an intuitive quality tool based on ordered frequencies and accumulation, to each fiscal year to identify the top reasons that caused the injuries. Finally, we used statistical tests based on Poisson distribution to compare the total number of events in a fiscal year to the total number in an earlier year to check if the difference (reduction or improvement) is statistically significant or not.

Outcome Measures

Children’s National Hospital had a 44.3% reduction in the average monthly count for the slips/trips/falls events after the baseline period of FY17 according to the centerline shift as noted on the c-Chart (Fig. ​ (Fig.2), 2 ), from 7.348 to 4.091 with a statistically significant difference of -3.257 (95% CI: −4.887, −1.627; P < 0.001). Of note, January and February 2019 saw a significant jump in falls in parking lots due to icy conditions caused by successive snowstorms. However, these incidents did not occur within the scope of a Children’s National Hospital-owned and managed facility and are excluded from the analysis.

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Slips, trips, and falls c-chart

Process improvement was also compared with the overall count of slips, trips, and falls for different fiscal years, as shown in Table ​ Table2. 2 . The annual total count decreased from 91 in FY17 to 83 in FY18 by 8.8% and from 83 in FY18 to 61 in FY19 by 26.5% in stepwise increments with an insignificant difference of -8 (95% CI: −33.9, 17.9; P = 0.545) and marginal difference of −22 (95% CI: −45.5, 1.5; P = 0.067), respectively. The decrease from 91 in FY17 to 61 in FY19 by 33% is a statistically significant difference of −30 (95% CI: −54.2, −5.8; P = 0.015). We base the significance on Poisson distribution because the data are the counts of rarely occurring safety events.

Year to Year Comparison of Overall Slips/Trips/Falls

The makeup of injury events evolved over the 2-year study period as well. Compared with baseline data from FY17, as seen in Figure ​ Figure1, 1 , the Pareto charts for FY 18 (Fig. ​ (Fig.3) 3 ) and FY 19 (Fig. ​ (Fig.4) 4 ) detail the composition of the reason for falling. For example, initial data from FY 2017 showed that the highest percentage (50%) of injuries were attributable to wet floors; by FY2019, wet floors no longer caused the largest percentage of injury, accounting for only 16% of cases.

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Pareto chart FY 2018, slips/trips/falls

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Pareto chart FY 2019, slips/trips/falls

This report details a single free-standing Children’s Hospital experience improving organizational slips, trips, and falls. We accomplish this within a comprehensive Employee Staff Safety program driven by hospital leadership previously described. 8

Mitchell et al’s October 2012 commentary from the Institute of Medicine’s Best Practices Innovation collaborative highlighted the importance of high-functioning teams in health care. 12 They establish that shared goals, clear roles, mutual trust, effective communication, and measurable processes and outcomes are the fundamental principles of team-based health care. 12 The importance of a multidisciplinary team structure cannot be overstated; it requires content expertise with authority to carry out real-time changes and quality experts providing guidance.

This concept is seen in Fred Lunenberg’s description of power and leadership. 13 He lays out the five sources of power in two categories: organizational power and personal power. 13 Organizational power contains three subtypes: legitimate power that comes from the position an individual holds within an institution and their authority over other members of the institution; reward power is a person’s influence over others’ behavior by providing them with things they want; coercive power is a person’s ability to influence others’ behavior by punishing them or by creating a perceived threat to do so. Personal power has two subtypes: expert power is a person’s ability to influence others’ behavior because of recognized knowledge, skills, or abilities; referent power is a person’s ability to influence others’ behavior because they like, admire, and respect the individual.

It is important to have a leader and members who possess various power forms to ensure the group is productive and successful in a multidisciplinary team structure. In this experience for slips/trips/falls, the Director of EVS oversaw the workgroup. His expertise in the area gave him expert power to make well-informed decisions. His direct supervision of managers and legitimate power that provided direct communication with EVS employees allowed for a real-time change in practice and feedback. This model can be applied to building a team to address any focus area within employee safety or, more broadly, across quality improvement initiatives hospital-wide, where an inefficient team can impede progress.

The EVS partnership with other disciplines, including nursing, security, and food services representatives, facilitated a unified and consistent message and a plan for slips/trips/falls prevention in high traffic areas of the hospital. The quality experts regularly reconvene the workgroup to review progress and update key driver diagrams in real-time to adjust the strategies effectively. In addition, due to this collaboration, the group was able to create “kits” to tackle areas of high injury rate, including the “Spill Kit” and “Floor Care Kit.”

As the work progressed over time, the impact was reflected in the total number of overall Slip/Trip/Fall injuries and the etiologies of those injuries. There was a natural evolution in the area’s initial focus, vis-a-vis the area with the highest percentage of injury, wet floor transitions. As such, it became clear the importance of continued analysis using Pareto charts to allow a more broad and real-time understanding of where the injuries continued to occur with the highest frequency. Key Driver Diagrams are modified to address these updated identified areas of interest. Overall, the process identified several critical areas tackled in a sequence of highest priority based on frequency as identified by Pareto chart analysis. It is crucial to constantly evolve the Key Driver Diagram to ensure it remains relevant and actionable.

Importantly, we believe this work is novel in its approach to addressing Slips/Trips/Falls; it is also generalizable to two broad areas: continued ESS work within the institution in other areas of employee injury outside of Slips/Trips/Falls and other institutions looking for a process map for making improvements to benefit employee safety. For example, at Children’s National Hospital, similar processes are taken to address sharps injuries, overexertion injuries, fluid exposures, and verbal and physical violence.

The limitations of this study include the inability of the group to control all aspects of the causes of injury, most notably injury attributed to an accident on the fault of the employee that was unrelated to the environment, as well as injury at locations where Children’s National Hospital was not the landlord and therefore had no direct ability to modify the environment. However, with an appropriate selection of group leaders able to directly intervene in the areas of interest and the support of a multidisciplinary group and quality improvement experts, change can be implemented to improve one domain affecting employee safety and sustained over a multiyear period.

ACNOWLEDGMENTS

There are no others who assisted with this study. There was no financial support or sponsorship of this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. These data have not previously been presented.

The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article.

Supplementary Material

Published online March 30, 2022

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Clickable URL citations appear in the text.

To cite: Peir GH; Fink A; Mantasas N; Cheng JJ; Worten K; Shah RK. Slips, Trips, and Falls: A Quality Improvement Initiative. Pediatr Qual Saf 2022;7:e550.

hospital in trips

Slips, trips, and falls of healthcare workers

Slips, trips, and falls (STFs) are a significant problem for healthcare workers and can result in serious injury and occupational injuries that cause time off from work. STFs are the second leading cause of serious injury among hospital workers, with overexertion being the first leading cause of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses according to the United States Bureau of Labor (BOL). In 2007, BOL statistics showed incidence rates of 35 injuries per 10,000 full-time RNs that involved days away from work as well as selected events or exposures for RNs that led to injury or illness due to STFs. Data show that hospitals have a 67% higher rate of STF incidence than all other employers in U.S. private industry. The average cost to an employer when a worker experiences a fall is $12,470. Therefore, employers who implement a prevention program can experience substantial savings. What is causing these injuries? STFs may be due to multiple factors, including wet floors, low-profile equipment and cords, poor lighting, improper footwear, improper drainage, and adverse weather conditions. Wet floors can occur as a result of spills or routine housekeeping or can be related to weather or even assisting patients to the shower. Wet floors can best be signaled by placing highly visible “Caution: Wet floor” signs, preferably 4 feet tall and with flashing lights, in areas that have been mopped recently, or wall-mounted pop-up tents can be placed over the wet area so employees are aware of the hazard until housekeeping can address the spill. Barriers should be removed promptly once the floor is dry so they do not become trip hazards. Anticipatory planning to avoid wet spots reduces falls. Providing lids on all cups being transported helps to avoid spills, which are particularly prone to occur at exits from the cafeteria or in an elevator. Paper-towel holders strategically placed in these high-spill areas help employees clean up the spills promptly. In clinical areas, pads can be used to temporarily cover a spill that occurs in an operating room, since fluids spilled during surgery create hazards. Nurses who assist patients in the shower can be provided positive-grip shoe covers so they do not slip or fall. Pathways must be kept clear, particularly of low-profile equipment and cords that can be overlooked in patients’ rooms, hallways, operating rooms, or other care areas. Lighting must be adequate to visualize pathways, particularly stairways, when supplies or other items are being carried. Outside parking areas and entrances/exits must have proper lighting to aid personnel traversing the area. Proper footwear is important in preventing STFs. Lessons can be learned from industries, such as food service and commercial fishing, in which anti-slip footwear is standard. Some manufacturers make specialized slip-resistant footwear. In addition to being slip resistant, shoes should fully surround the foot and provide support. Certain weather conditions can lead to water being tracked indoors or can cause drainage problems across parking areas and outdoor walkways, which can create icy conditions in cold weather. Walk-off mats help when the water source is weather-related. Umbrella bags available to those entering the facility from outside in inclement weather help contain liquid that would otherwise drip onto the floor. It is important to correct external drainage problems when possible. In some STF prevention programs, employees were provided with conveniently located ice melt that could be applied as soon as icy weather conditions occurred. Employees received weather alerts to help them plan the proper outdoor foot­wear and to exercise caution. Ice cleats can be offered to nurses who must traverse icy or snowy areas when providing home health care. Because of the diversity of healthcare workers in terms of age, job duties, and experience in their current roles, an STF program is critical to create a safe work environment. During program development, each healthcare facility conducts a hazard vulnerability analysis to look at the facility’s unique set of hazards so they can be appropriately addressed in a workplace safety program that targets STFs. Although STF injuries are a significant problem for healthcare workers, many STF injuries are preventable through a comprehensive preventive program.

Nancy L. Hughes is the director of ANA’s Center for Occupational and Environmental Health.

hospital in trips

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  • Hospitals : Patient Care Unit - Slips/Trips/Falls

Hospitals eTool

Patient care unit » slips/trips/falls.

Because of the high traffic and compact treatment spaces for patient care units, slips/trips/falls are a specific concern. For example, there is a slip and fall hazard if water or other fluid is spilled on the floor, electrical cords run across pathways, or if emergency equipment or supplies block passageways.

Requirements under OSHA's Walking-Working Surfaces Standard, 29 CFR 1910.22

  • Keep floors clean and dry. [ 29 CFR 1910.22(a)(2) ]
  • Keep aisles and passageways clear and in good repair, with no obstruction across or in aisles that could create a hazard. [ 29 CFR 1910.22(a) ]

Other OSHA Requirements

Follow Bloodborne Pathogens Standard spill clean-up requirements for spills containing blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) [ 29 CFR 1910.1030 ].

Additional Information

  • See Hospital-wide Hazards - Slips/Trips/Falls .
  • Walking-Working Surfaces . OSHA.
  • Inspection Guidance for Inpatient Healthcare Settings . (June 25, 2015). OSHA memorandum establishing guidance for inspections conducted in inpatient healthcare settings.

Key benefits of travel medical insurance

  • Travel medical insurance coverage
  • Who needs medical travel insurance?

Choosing the right travel medical insurance

How to use travel medical insurance, is travel medical insurance right for your next trip, travel medical insurance: essential coverage for health and safety abroad.

Affiliate links for the products on this page are from partners that compensate us (see our advertiser disclosure with our list of partners for more details). However, our opinions are our own. See how we rate insurance products to write unbiased product reviews.

  • Travel medical insurance covers unexpected emergency medical expenses while traveling.
  • Travelers off to foreign countries or remote areas should strongly consider travel medical insurance.
  • If you have to use your travel medical insurance, keep all documents related to your treatment.

Of all the delights associated with travel to far-flung locales, getting sick or injured while away from home is low on the savvy traveler's list. Beyond gut-wrenching anxiety, seeking medical treatment in a foreign country can be exceedingly inconvenient and expensive.

The peace of mind that comes with travel insurance for the many things that could ail you while abroad is priceless. As options for travel-related insurance abound, it's essential to research, read the fine print, and act according to the specifics of your itinerary, pocketbook, and other needs.

Travel insurance reimburses you for any unexpected medical expenses incurred while traveling. On domestic trips, travel medical insurance usually take a backseat to your health insurance. However, when traveling to a foreign country, where your primary health insurance can't cover you, travel medical insurance takes the wheel. This can be especially helpful in countries with high medical care costs, such as Scandinavian countries.

Emergency medical evacuation insurance

Another benefit that often comes with travel medical insurance, emergency medical evacuation insurance covers you for any costs to transport you to an adequately equipped medical center. Emergency medical evacuation insurance is often paired with repatriation insurance, which covers costs associated with returning your remains to your home country if the worst happens. 

These benefits are for worst-case scenarios, but they might be more necessary depending on the type of trips you take. Emergency medical evacuation insurance is helpful if you're planning on traveling to a remote location or if you're traveling on a cruise as sea to land evacuations can be costly. Some of the best travel insurance companies also offer non-medical evacuations as part of an adventure sports insurance package.

It's also worth mentioning that emergency medical evacuation insurance is required for international students studying in the US on a J Visa. 

Types of coverage offered by travel medical insurance

The exact terms of your coverage will vary depending on your insurer, but you can expect most travel medical insurance policies to offer the following coverages.

  • Hospital room and board
  • Inpatient/outpatient hospital services
  • Prescription Drugs
  • COVID-19 treatment
  • Emergency room services
  • Urgent care visits
  • Local ambulance
  • Acute onset of pre-existing conditions
  • Dental coverage (accident/sudden relief of pain)
  • Medical care due to terrorist attack
  • Emergency medical evacuation 
  • Repatriation of mortal remains
  • Accidental death and dismemberment

Travel medical insurance and pre-existing conditions

Many travel insurance providers will cover pre-existing conditions as long as certain conditions are met. For one, travelers need to purchase their travel insurance within a certain time frame from when they placed a deposit on their trip, usually two to three weeks. 

Additionally, travel insurance companies usually only cover stable medical conditions, which are conditions that don't need additional medical treatment, diagnosis, or medications.

Who needs travel medical insurance?

Even the best-laid travel plans can go awry. As such, it pays to consider your potential healthcare needs before taking off, even if you are generally healthy. Even if well-managed, preexisting conditions like diabetes or asthma can make a medical backup plan even more vital.

Having what you need to refill prescriptions or get other care if you get stuck somewhere other than home could be essential to your health and well-being. That's without counting all the accidents and illnesses that can hit us when away from home.

Individuals traveling for extended periods (more than six months) or engaging in high-risk activities (think scuba diving or parasailing) should also consider a solid medical travel plan. Both scenarios increase the likelihood that medical attention, whether routine or emergency, could be needed.

In the case of travel via the friendly seas, it's also worth considering cruise trip travel insurance . Routine care will be available onboard. But anything beyond that will require transportation to the nearest land mass (and could quickly become extremely expensive, especially if you're in another country).

Like other types of insurance, medical travel insurance rates are calculated based on various factors. Failing to disclose a preexisting health condition could result in a lapse of coverage right when you need it, as insurers can cancel your policy if you withhold material information. So honesty is always the best policy.

Even the best-laid travel plans can go awry. As such, it pays to consider your potential healthcare needs before taking off, even if you are generally healthy. Making the right choice when shopping for travel medical insurance can mean the difference between a minor hiccup in your travels and a financial nightmare. 

When a travel insurance company comes up with a quote for your policy, they take a few factors into consideration, such as your age, your destination, and the duration of your trip. You should do the same when assessing a travel insurance company. 

For example, older travelers who are more susceptible to injury may benefit from travel medical insurance (though your premiums will be higher). If you're traveling for extended periods throughout one calendar year, you should look into an annual travel medical insurance plan . If you're engaging in high-risk activities (think scuba diving or parasailing), you should seek a plan that includes coverage for injuries sustained in adventure sports.

In the case of travel via the friendly seas, it's also worth considering cruise trip medical travel insurance. Routine care will be available onboard. But anything beyond that will require transportation to the nearest land mass (and could quickly become extremely expensive, especially if you're in another country).

Travel medical insurance isn't just for peace of mind. If you travel often enough, there's a good chance you'll eventually experience an incident where medical treatment is necessary.

Before you submit your claim, you should take some time to understand your policy. Your travel medical insurance is either primary (you can submit claims directly to your travel medical insurance provider) or secondary (you must first submit claims to your primary insurance provider). In the case of secondary travel medical insurance, a refusal notice from your primary insurance provider, even if it does not cover medical claims outside the US, is often required as evidence of protocol.

On that note, you should be sure to document every step of your medical treatment. You should keep any receipts for filled prescriptions, hospital bills, and anything else documenting your medical emergency.

As many people have found out the hard way, reading the fine print is vital. Most travel insurance policies will reimburse your prepaid, nonrefundable expenses if you fall ill with a severe condition, including illnesses like COVID-19. 

Still on the fence about whether or not  travel insurance is worth it ? It's worth noting that many travel insurance plans also include medical protections, so you can also protect against trip cancellations and other unexpected developments while obtaining travel medical insurance.

While short, domestic trips may not warrant travel medical insurance, it may be a good idea to insure longer, international trips. You should also consider travel medical insurance for trips to remote areas, where a medical evacuation may be expensive, and more physically tasking trips.

While shopping for travel medical insurance may not be fun, a little advance leg work can let you relax on your trip and give you peace of mind. After all, that is the point of a vacation. 

Medical travel insurance frequently asked questions

Trip insurance covers any unexpected financial losses while traveling, such as the cost of replacing lost luggage, trip interruptions, and unexpected medical expenses. Travel medical insurance just covers those medical expenses without the trip interruption or cancellation insurance.

Travel insurance companies usually offer adventure sports as add-on coverage or a separate plan entirely. You'll likely pay more for a policy with adventure sports coverage. 

Many travel medical insurance policies now include coverage for COVID-19 related medical expenses and treat it like any other illness. However, you should double-check your policy to ensure that is the case.

hospital in trips

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Stevie Nicks Postpones Another Concert ‘Due to Illness’

The singer/songwriter will no longer perform Tuesday night at Grand Rapids, Michigan's Van Andel Arena after delaying a Pennsylvania show over the weekend.

By Katie Atkinson

Katie Atkinson

Executive Digital Director, West Coast

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Stevie Nicks

Stevie Nicks will no longer play at Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on Tuesday night “due to illness,” according to a statement on the venue’s social media.

“Due to illness, the Stevie Nicks concerts on Tuesday, June 18 in Grand Rapids has been postponed to September 24,” the statement reads. “Customers should hold on to their tickets, previously purchased tickets will be honored.”

Stevie Nicks Soars Through a Night of Songs & Stories at Mohegan Sun: 5 Best Moments

Trending on billboard.

The Hershey, Grand Rapids and Chicago concerts are the final three U.S. dates on Nicks’ current tour. She has six shows scheduled in Europe for July, including in Dublin, London and Amsterdam, and then will return Stateside to make up the Grand Rapids concert in September; no new date has been announced for Hersheypark as of press time.

On June 9, Billboard ‘s Ashley Iasimone covered Nicks’ concert the Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Connecticut . During the set, Nicks poked fun at herself for telling rambling (and fascinating) stories about her decades as a rock star, but she wouldn’t have it any other way. “I’m so old,” Nicks said with a grin onstage. “… What’s everybody gonna say to me? ‘Stop! You can’t do this anymore!’ I’ll say, ‘OK. Fine. I’ll just go home and be alone in a rocking chair with my dog Lily.'”

See Van Andel Arena’s statement about Tuesday night’s show below.

Due to illness, the Stevie Nicks concerts on Tuesday, June 18 in Grand Rapids has been postponed to September 24. Customers should hold on to their tickets, previously purchased tickets will be honored. Stevie looks forward to seeing fans on Friday night in Chicago. pic.twitter.com/glaCsi5mIy — Van Andel Arena (@VanAndelArena) June 17, 2024

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Family mourns doctor killed in kayaking accident on Willamette: ‘Everyone should have an uncle like him’

POLK COUNTY Ore. (KPTV) - An Oregon family is grieving after their son was killed in a kayaking accident on the Willamette River in Polk County , Thursday night.

The family said they are still working to process the sudden loss but want to remember their loved one as the adventurous, generous, and kind person he was to everyone he came in contact with. Those are all characteristics his family said came easy to him as a family medicine doctor.

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office reports that 50-year-old Jacob Jackson was on the Willamette when his kayak collided with the Buena Vista Ferry after he had a malfunction with his steering mechanism.

Jacob Jackson’s mother, Melodie Jackson, said he was with a friend and they were using a type of kayak that was unfamiliar to her son.

“The kayaks were not the ones where you sit up and have a paddle, they had pedals of some kind, and the kayak he was given malfunctioned,” Melodie Jackson said. “Of course, it was unusual to him first of all, and when they launched into the water, he was trying to sort out how it works and then they saw the ferry which was launched at the same time. It was poor timing. They tried to get away but they couldn’t.”

The responding dive team said Jacob Jackson fell into the water after being pulled into the current and striking the ferry. His clothes then got caught in the propeller, leaving him trapped under the water.

His sister, Katrinka Blunt, said her brother enjoyed water sports regularly, knowing the proper safety precautions.

“I understand from the police report that he did have his life vest with him but wasn’t wearing it at the time. I’ve also understood that if you get caught in that propeller a life vest probably wouldn’t have saved you anyway. And so, I choose not to dwell on the fact that this time he didn’t have it on. These things can happen to anyone,” Blunt said. “It’s easy to find blame, but in the end, it doesn’t change the outcome at all and we’re just going to miss him. I am sorry for all those who saw that happen. That is horrible to watch, and I just hope everyone can find comfort where they can.”

The family is too working to find comfort where they can, though they are still in a state of shock, thinking their son will walk into the room at any moment.

“It’s not something I expected. So it’s just hard to believe it’s real,” Melodie Jackson said.

“It just still feels like he’s on a trip and we’ll see him again,” Blunt added.

His family said Jacob Jackson was a warm and kind man who filled any empty space, especially as the “fun uncle” to his 20 nieces and nephews.

“I think everyone should have an uncle like him. He would come and there was no uncomfortableness. He was just making jokes as he came in and was always interested in what each of them were doing,” Blunt said.

Melodie Jackson said her son was not one for the spotlight, but rather a supportive pillar in their family.

“In fact, he never led with ‘I’m a doctor.’ He just wanted to be a regular guy,” Melodie Jackson said.

The “regular guy” worked at Keizer Permanente in Salem for many years before deciding he wanted to travel more and served as a doctor wherever he was needed.

“Like all of us, I think some of the plans that he had for himself didn’t go exactly as he saw. But he embraced what he had. And I will remember him for that,” Blunt said.

The family also wants their son and brother to be remembered for his desire to bring people together and for his love of being on the water.

A memorial service is being planned and is expected to happen within the next week.

Copyright 2024 KPTV-KPDX. All rights reserved.

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Assault suspect 'missed the victim,' needed a trip to the hospital before jail, police say

by LENNY COHEN | The National Desk

Aron Denis Thomas{&nbsp;}was arrested for assault. He was taken to the hospital and booked after midnight, May 28, 2024. (Lake Co. Sheriff's Office)

GROVELAND, Fla. (TND) — A police officer "responded to a fight in progress" but the guy he would eventually arrest, "upon learning law enforcement was en route, fled the scene."

The arrest report from May 27 in Florida mentioned, “The victim is the stepson of the defendant and they resided together in the past as a family.”

The victim told the officer, “His stepfather, the defendant, came to the residence uninvited and began an argument with him over family matters.
“The defendant then attempted to strike the victim against his wishes, and missed the victim.
“The victim then struck the defendant twice, causing the defendant to become unconscious as a result.

“The victim's mother and grandmother called Lake County Fire to render aid, but the defendant then fled the scene and went to his residence in Mascotte, possibly in attempts to avoid contact with law enforcement.”

The officer's next stop was the home of the suspect, Aron Denis Thomas, where authorities requested paramedics “to render aid to the defendant, due to the injuries he sustained during the altercation.”

According to the arrest report, “Upon contact with the defendant who had been consuming alcohol, he advised he was attacked unprovoked.
“He could not advise why he fled the scene and did not call for help.”

Thomas, 42, was arrested for assault. He was taken to the hospital and then to jail.

He spent 13 hours behind bars before his release in lieu of $1,000 bond.

hospital in trips

Man hospitalized after Phoenix duplex apartment goes up in flames

PHOENIX (AZFamily) — One man is recovering in the hospital after a duplex apartment went up in flames in Phoenix early Saturday morning.

Phoenix firefighters received reports of the fire coming from the duplex near 32nd Street and Greenway Road around 2:30 a.m. As crews arrived, they found flames and smoke pouring from the apartments.

Investigators say handlines were quickly deployed as crews aggressively attacked the blaze. Since the fire grew quickly, the response was balanced to a first alarm, with additional firefighters and resources requested to fight the flames.

One man is recovering in the hospital after a Phoenix duplex apartment went up in flames early...

While crews were working to put out flames inside the apartment, the roof collapsed, forcing firefighters to switch to a defensive operation. Master streams were used to extinguish the blaze, and other firefighters used hand lines to put out the fire from inside.

Phoenix Fire says it’s unclear how many people are displaced currently. One man was hospitalized for minor smoke inhalation, and no firefighters were injured.

The cause of the blaze is under investigation.

See a spelling or grammatical error in our story? Please click here to report it .

Do you have a photo or video of a breaking news story? Send it to us here with a brief description.

Copyright 2024 KTVK/KPHO. All rights reserved.

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Health chief tours hospitals

Comprehensive healthcare

Secretary for Health Prof Lo Chung-mau (second right) visits ZhongShan Chenxinghai Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese & Western Medicine.

Healthcare co-operation

Prof Lo (front row, fifth right) tours the University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital.

Secretary for Health Prof Lo Chung-mau today led a delegation on visits to two Tier III Class A hospitals in the Greater Bay Area to learn about the latest services, facilities and medical standards offered in the Mainland by such hospitals and to discuss ways of boosting cross-boundary medical collaboration.

The delegation went to the ZhongShan Chenxinghai Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese & Western Medicine in the morning.

The hospital is the first Tier III Class A hospital of integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine to be co-developed by Guangdong and Hong Kong. In 2021, it was included in the first batch of healthcare institutions in the bay area that are allowed to use Hong Kong-registered drugs and medical devices used in Hong Kong public hospitals. It was also included in the Elderly Health Care Voucher Greater Bay Area Pilot Scheme this February.

The delegation toured multiple departments at the hospital, including its Health Management Center, Integrated Endoscopy Center, Health Construction Administration & Rehabilitation Department, International Medical Center, Stomatology Department and 3D Printing Application Center. Representatives of the hospital introduced the healthcare and support services available to Hong Kong and Macau citizens.

In the afternoon, the delegation headed to Shenzhen to visit the University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital. Operating under a model of management and co-operation between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, the hospital is another integrated Tier III Class A hospital and has long been at the forefront of cross-boundary medical collaboration. In 2015, it became the very first bay area Mainland medical institution where Elderly Health Care Vouchers can be used to pay for designated out-patient services.

In 2021, it became the only healthcare institution in the bay area to use Hong Kong-registered drugs and medical devices used in Hong Kong public hospitals on a trial basis, and then one of the first batch of institutions allowed to use such drugs and devices on a regularised basis.

After touring departments such as the out-patient pharmacy, the Department of Family Medicine and the Department of Dental Surgery in the hospital, the delegation was briefed on the hospital's arrangements in relation to providing cross-boundary medical services.

During the visit, Health Bureau personnel introduced two new functions on the eHealth mobile application, namely “Cross-boundary Health Record” and “Personal Folder”. These will be launched at the hospital on a trial basis on July 15 to facilitate cross-boundary medical collaboration.

Prof Lo said that with travel to and from the Mainland increasing, demand from Hong Kong citizens for healthcare services in the Mainland has been on the rise, with greater emphasis being put on Chinese medicine for disease prevention and treatment.

He noted that today's visits not only enhanced the delegation's understanding of Tier III Class A hospitals in the Mainland, but also increased the two institutions' awareness of the medical needs of Hong Kong citizens.

He emphasised that the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government remains committed to fulfilling its important role of safeguarding the well-being of Hong Kong citizens by continuing to provide them with quality healthcare services and will never shift its responsibility for their well-being to the Mainland healthcare system.

He added that in formulating cross-boundary healthcare measures, the Hong Kong SAR Government will support the healthcare needs of Hong Kong citizens who choose to pursue opportunities and live in the Mainland, while also taking into account the potential impact of the measures on the social resources and livelihoods of citizens in the Mainland.

First look: IU Health provides peek at hospital construction, hotel-like design

hospital in trips

Three large towers will join the Indianapolis skyline as IU Health’s new downtown hospital and look like nothing else in the city.

The $2.3 billion project is set to open in 2027 and will contain over 2 million square feet of space. The buildings will consolidate IU Health Methodist Hospital and University Hospital and be a significant source of redevelopment in downtown’s Northside.

IU officials provided a media sneak peek of the project Wednesday.

The three towers will reach nearly 700 feet and 16 stories high. The designs make heavy use of natural elements with limestone veneer and faux wood external and internal features, all resting on a solid granite base. The modern design with natural elements will be unique on Indy’s skyline and effectively expand it to the north.

The hospital will have 864 licensed beds, and all rooms will be private. Each room will be 325 square feet.

Dr. Ryan Nagy, president of the IU Health Adult Academic Health Center, believes the investment reflects IU Health’s commitment to excellence.

“It says we are optimistic, we are aggressive, we have the resources, and we intend to lead health care. We do not seek to just get by; we don’t seek to just be good; we seek to be the best,” Nagy said.

Design goes for a hotel vibe

The facility has been designed with the comfort and well being of its visitors in mind, according to Jim Mladucky, vice president of design and construction of the project. Drawing inspiration from the design philosophies of Disney and major hotel chains, the hospital aims to create a stage-like atmosphere that reduces anxiety for visitors. The building is designed for natural light to take center stage, with renderings showing the exterior covered with windows.

Mladucky said the design philosophy extends to meaningful rest spaces for employees that are easily accessible. Some health care workers don't leave their unit during a shift because rest areas are too far away. The new hospital will have them on every floor.

Staff areas of reprieve climbed to the forefront of considerations during the pandemic, according to Nagy. The toll front-line workers faced in inadequate spaces left many burnt out.

The new hospital is also designed with flexibility in mind, so if an emergency takes precedence, rooms can be used for whatever is needed most.

The hospital's ground level will include a large multipurpose green space in front of the tower entrances designed to be used by the community, which Mladucky said is rare downtown.

'Part of this neighborhood'

“We want it to be open to our neighbors; we are a part of this neighborhood,” he said.

The ground floors will also include retail and dining options, another way Mladucky believes the hospital is creating a multiuse space for more people. Initial plans included space for a grocery store, fitness center and child care facilities, but nothing is finalized.

The designers have worked closely with IndyGo to create convenient bus stop locations, particularly on the Red Line. Mladucky expects significant increases in housing developments near the site and said IU Health is working closely with developers to ensure affordable housing is developed in the neighborhood to avoid gentrification.

The new construction will have significant improvements in sustainability and carbon emissions. IU Health estimates that the buildings will reduce carbon emissions by 34,000 metric tons, worth $8 million annually in operating costs.

Overall, IU Health expects to save $50 million annually in operating costs by combining the two hospitals. There are no current plans for the Methodist Hospital buildings after the new hospital’s opening. University Hospital will be turned over to IU Indianapolis.

Construction is expected to reach a major milestone later this summer, with the base reaching completion and construction on the three towers beginning. The hospital is projected to open during the fourth quarter of 2027.

Tyler Spence is a Pulliam Fellow primarily covering business. He can be contacted at [email protected] .

Man on fishing trip drowns trying to retrieve his keys from a lake. Companion tried to save him

Authorities say a man drowned in a lake in upstate New York after his keys fell into the water and he tried to retrieve them

HASTINGS, N.Y. — A man drowned in a lake in upstate New York after his keys fell into the water and he tried to retrieve them, police said.

Anthony Davis, 44, was fishing with two other men in Oneida Lake in the town of Hastings just before 10 a.m. Sunday when Davis’ keys fell in the water, Lt. Andrew Bucher, of the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office, said in a news release.

Davis went into the water to try to get his keys but could not make it back to land, Bucher said. One of the other men, Wattie Cappers, 42, went in after Davis but also was unable to get back to land.

Personnel from several local police and fire departments arrived and tried to rescue the two men, Bucher said.

Davis was pulled from the water by a diver from the Brewerton Fire Department and taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Cappers was rescued by Oswego sheriff’s deputies and was stable at the hospital.

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COMMENTS

  1. Don't Slip Up: Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls

    Slips, trips and falls (STFs) can happen anywhere, and hospitals are no exception. Whether in a patient room or an operating room, STFs are a potentially costly and largely preventable risk to both patients and hospital staff alike. Falls are of particular concern with patients over the age of 65, who make up the vast majority of hospitalized ...

  2. PDF Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention

    from slips, trips, and falls (STFs) on the same level in hospitals was 38.2 per 10,000 employees, which was 90% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined (20.1 per 10,000 em-ployees). STFs as a whole are the second most com-mon cause of lost-workday injuries in hospitals. 39% 25% 14% 10% 5% 4% 2% 1% Overexertion ...

  3. Ways to Survive Your Next Trip to the Hospital

    Even though hospitals disinfect rooms between patients, studies show that up to 60 percent of hospital rooms are not cleaned properly. For extra protection, ask a nurse for some bleach wipes or bring your own (bleach is necessary to kill C. diff). Wipe down the room or have a family member do it.

  4. Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Outpatient Setting: Strategies to ...

    Slips, Trips, and Falls in the Outpatient Setting: Strategies to Prevent and Address Patient Injury at Medical Offices. By: Rebecca Summey-Lowman. 2 Minute Read While hospital staff's vigilance about preventing patient falls is well-known, the record with outpatient practices is less clear. Fall risk prevention strategies typically used in ...

  5. Slip, Trip and Fall Prevention for Health Care Workers

    01/07/2022. Safety & Preparation Health Care. Slips, trips and falls (STFs) are one of the most common types of claims and a source of loss for many industries. The health care industry isn't an exception to this trend. In fact, slips, trips, and falls make up 66% of all claims in health care, according to The Hartford's data.

  6. Slip, Trip & Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers

    Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics [2009], the incidence rate of lost-workday injuries from slips, trips, and falls (STFs) on the same level in hospitals was 38.2 per 10,000 employees, which was 90% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined (20.1 ...

  7. Preventing falls in hospital

    What we do to prevent falls in hospital. The risk of falling increases as you get older, but there are many ways to avoid slips, trips and falls. Everyone admitted to our hospitals has a falls risk assessment. This assessment helps us to find what might make you more likely to fall. We can then plan how to reduce the risk.

  8. 12 Best Items to Pack for a Hospital Stay

    Here are 12 of the most important items to pack in your hospital bag for a long stay: 1. Pillows and Blankets from Home. Your softest blankets and plushest pillows can help you feel more relaxed and at home, which is especially helpful during long hospital stays. If anyone is good at the tied quilts, crocheted blankets and or knit blankets they ...

  9. Medical tourism

    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling abroad to obtain medical treatment. In the past, this usually referred to those who traveled from less-developed countries to major medical centers in highly developed countries for treatment unavailable at home. [1] [2] However, in recent years it may equally refer to those from developed countries ...

  10. Slips, Trips, and Falls: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    At Children's National Hospital, the ESS slips/trips/falls subgroup performed baseline analysis and identified 91 injury incidents in FY 2017. ... Children's National Hospital had a 44.3% reduction in the average monthly count for the slips/trips/falls events after the baseline period of FY17 according to the centerline shift as noted on ...

  11. Slips, trips, and falls of healthcare workers

    March 24, 2009. Slips, trips, and falls (STFs) are a significant problem for healthcare workers and can result in serious injury and occupational injuries that cause time off from work. STFs are the second leading cause of serious injury among hospital workers, with overexertion being the first leading cause of nonfatal occupational injuries ...

  12. A Caregiver's Checklist for Hospital Trips

    A trip to the hospital with a person who has memory loss or dementia can be stressful for both of you. Relieve some of that stress by planning for planned and unplanned hospital visits.

  13. 10 Essentials You Need to Pack for Your Medical Tourism Trip

    You can't always know what a hospital or care facility in a different country will have on hand. Aspirin and other painkillers may be abundant in your country, but they may be much harder to find in the country where you are headed. Assumptions about other cultures and hospitals in other countries can leave you without something you need. ‍ 5.

  14. A Spill, a Slip, a Hospital Trip -- Occupational Health & Safety

    A Spill, a Slip, a Hospital Trip. Slips, trips, and falls are an everyday risk at hospitals and comprise one of the top accident categories. By John M. Eliszewski; Nov 01, 2015;

  15. eTool : Hospitals

    Wet floors, spills, and clutter can lead to slips/trips/falls and other possible injuries. Requirements under OSHA's Walking-Working Surfaces Standard, 29 CFR 1910.22. Keep floors clean and dry. [29 CFR 1910.22(a)(2)] Keep aisles and passageways clear and in good repair, with no obstruction across or in aisles that could create a hazard.

  16. eTool : Hospitals

    Hazard. Because of the high traffic and compact treatment spaces for patient care units, slips/trips/falls are a specific concern. For example, there is a slip and fall hazard if water or other fluid is spilled on the floor, electrical cords run across pathways, or if emergency equipment or supplies block passageways.

  17. How to go to the hospital in Florence, Italy

    Use your best Italian that you've been waiting to use with locals to ask where the hospital is. 5. Walk the 1.5 kilometers to the hospital with your very supportive husband while supporting your wrist and trying not to cry. 6. Find the "teaching hospital" and wait in the waiting area with the locals.

  18. Hospitals in Antalya

    Join us at Antalya by the Thames, a free festival of summer, sun, and Turkish culture—with a real sand beach! Meet us at Potters Fields Park by Tower Bridge on 9th and 10th August to celebrate the premiere of The Wanderer "Warm Regards from Antalya," an episode that invites travellers to adventure through one of Türkiye's most beautiful coastal cities.

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    Hospital room and board; Inpatient/outpatient hospital services; Prescription Drugs; COVID-19 treatment; ... While short, domestic trips may not warrant travel medical insurance, it may be a good ...

  20. МСЧ АО МЗ 'Электросталь' Map

    МСЧ АО МЗ 'Электросталь' is a hospital in Gorodskoy Okrug Elektrostal', Moscow Oblast. МСЧ АО МЗ 'Электросталь' is situated nearby to the post offices Электросталь 144002 and СДЭК .

  21. Stevie Nicks Postpones Another Concert 'Due to Illness'

    Stevie Nicks won't play at Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on Tuesday night "due to illness," according to a statement from the venue.

  22. Family mourns doctor killed in kayaking accident on Willamette ...

    An Oregon family is grieving after their son was killed in a kayaking accident on the Willamette River in Polk County, Thursday night.

  23. Electrostal History and Art Museum

    Art MuseumsHistory Museums. Write a review. Full view. All photos (22) Suggest edits to improve what we show. Improve this listing. The area. Nikolaeva ul., d. 30A, Elektrostal 144003 Russia. Reach out directly.

  24. Plan Your Trip to Dzerzhinsky: Best of Dzerzhinsky Tourism

    Dzerzhinsky Tourism: Tripadvisor has 345 reviews of Dzerzhinsky Hotels, Attractions, and Restaurants making it your best Dzerzhinsky resource.

  25. Assault suspect 'missed the victim,' needed a trip to the hospital

    Assault suspect 'missed the victim,' needed a trip to the hospital before jail, police say ... June 14th 2024 at 3:12 PM. Aron Denis Thomas was arrested for assault. He was taken to the hospital ...

  26. Lyubertsy, Russia: All You Need to Know Before You Go (2024

    Lyubertsy Tourism: Tripadvisor has 1,975 reviews of Lyubertsy Hotels, Attractions, and Restaurants making it your best Lyubertsy resource.

  27. Man hospitalized after Phoenix duplex apartment goes up in ...

    PHOENIX (AZFamily) — One man is recovering in the hospital after a duplex apartment went up in flames in Phoenix early Saturday morning. Phoenix firefighters received reports of the fire coming ...

  28. news.gov.hk

    The hospital is the first Tier III Class A hospital of integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine to be co-developed by Guangdong and Hong Kong. In 2021, it was included in the first batch of healthcare institutions in the bay area that are allowed to use Hong Kong-registered drugs and medical devices used in Hong Kong public hospitals.

  29. IU Health provides peek at hospital construction, hotel-like design

    The hospital will have 864 licensed beds, and all rooms will be private. Each room will be 325 square feet. Dr. Ryan Nagy, president of the IU Health Adult Academic Health Center, believes the ...

  30. Man on fishing trip drowns trying to retrieve his keys from a lake

    HASTINGS, N.Y. — A man drowned in a lake in upstate New York after his keys fell into the water and he tried to retrieve them, police said. Anthony Davis, 44, was fishing with two other men in ...