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11 Rules for Road Trips While Pregnant, Including When To Stop Traveling by Car

A car trip can be a memorable vacation while pregnant, especially if flying is out of the question, but there are some precautions to take before you hit the road.

Everyone loves a good road trip. And if you're pregnant, a babymoon by car may be exactly what's needed before you're elbows-deep in dirty diapers. While it's generally safe to fly while expecting , some airlines have a cutoff of 36 weeks (and many even earlier), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Pregnant people who do fly should check with their doctors first, but they can make travel safer with simple steps like holding onto seatbacks when walking during turbulence and wearing compression socks to prevent deep vein thrombosis.

The great news is that car travel is safe for most pregnant people. If you have complications, you may need to stick closer to home but unless you're on bedrest or have other doctor-imposed limitations, you should be able to hit the road. Ask your health care provider when you should stop long road trips, but in most cases, it's safe until close to your due date.

To ensure the only bump on the road is your belly, here are 11 tips pregnant travelers should know before setting off on a long drive.

1. Talk To Your Health Care Provider

No matter the mode of travel, pregnant people should always start by contacting their health care provider, said Kecia Gaither, MD , maternal-fetal medicine specialist affiliated with NYC Health + Hospitals/Lincoln in the Bronx, New York. "Certain medical conditions may preclude any degree of travel, be it by air or land," says Dr. Gaither. "Those conditions may include placenta previa , prior preterm labor , or clotting disorders."

Placenta previa, for example, happens when the placenta completely or partially covers the cervix. It can cause bleeding during pregnancy, as well as serious complications—like hemorrhage or preterm birth—that would be difficult to navigate in an unfamiliar location.

Additionally, traveling is a risk factor for blood clots, according to the CDC—and pregnant people already have a heightened chance of developing them. Certain conditions and disorders may increase the risk of blood clots too much for long road trips.

2. Plan for Your Second Trimester

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) says the ideal time to travel is during the second trimester, between 14 and 28 weeks. "During these weeks, your energy has returned, morning sickness is improved or gone, and you are still able to get around easily," recommends the organization. "After 28 weeks, it may be harder to move around or sit for a long time."

Not only is the middle of the pregnancy when pregnant people will likely feel the best, but it also carries a lower risk of any complications.

3. Prepare for the Pregnancy Road Trip

Advanced planning can make any road trip easier. This includes thoughtful packing like easy-to-change clothing if you get too hot or too cold and taking healthy foods, snacks, and drinks. Also, make sure your route is accurate to avoid delays and check for safe places to stop.

4. Drink Enough Water

There's a link between dehydration and uterine contractions, so keeping on top of water intake is crucial, says Dr. Gaither. Have a sufficient supply of water readily available in the car and make sure to drink even more if you've been sweating or exercising. Pregnant people should drink eight to 12 cups (or 64 to 96 ounces) of water each day, according to ACOG. This ensures healthy digestion, amniotic fluid formation, and nutrient circulation.

5. Bring Extra Medications or Supplements

Taking the proper medications and supplements while pregnant is imperative, and it's even more important on a road trip. Dr. Gaither says pregnant travelers will want to double-check that they've packed any medications and vitamins they need.

It's also important to bring extra, in case they're on the road longer than originally anticipated. Include over-the-counter medicines approved by your health care provider, so you'll have them if you need them. And, don't forget to pack your prenatal vitamin !

6. Always Wear a Seat Belt

Wearing a seat belt in a car is one of the most important car safety tips, especially when you're pregnant. The myth that a seat belt could harm the fetus is pure fiction, but there's a proper way to wear one if you're pregnant, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Pregnant people should wear the shoulder belt away from their neck and across their chest. The lap belt should be secured below the belly so it fits snugly. Pregnant people should also keep as much distance as possible between their belly and the steering wheel, while still ensuring they can reach the wheel and pedals. Additionally, the NHTSA recommends pregnant people don't disable the airbags.

7. Get Out and Stretch Often

Dr. Gaither says pregnant travelers should stop "at least every two hours" and get out of the car, stretch, and walk around. This increases blood flow to the lower body which helps prevent complications like deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the legs. These blood clots usually dissolve on their own. However, in rare cases, they can break off, travel to the lungs, and block blood flow. This potentially life-threatening condition is called a pulmonary embolism.

While the risk for DVT is low, it does increase with pregnancy. The CDC recommends knowing the signs of DVT, which include swelling and/or redness in the leg (or arm), unexplained pain or tenderness, and skin that feels warm when touched. Signs of a pulmonary embolism include difficulty breathing, fast or irregular heartbeat, and chest pain or discomfort.

8. Dress Comfortably

Being comfortable during pregnancy is key, and that's especially true during a road trip. Luckily, a few essentials can make the ride more relaxing—and safer. Non-medical compression socks or support hosiery may be a good idea to help support blood flow.

Other helpful travel accessories include a lumbar pillow, comfortable shoes, and a good water bottle (because hydration is key to a healthy pregnancy ). A cooler, sunglasses, and sunscreen also may be helpful. And, avoid wearing too-tight clothing and shoes.

9. Avoid Remote Locations

Nothing is stopping most pregnant people from traveling, but it's always smart to be mindful of where you're going. If possible, maintain a steady speed (instead of speeding up and slowing down) and avoid winding, hilly, bumpy roads, and frequent lane changes. Also, don't travel to extremely remote areas where medical care may be difficult to find in case of an emergency.

10. Have an Emergency Plan in Place

Pregnant travelers will want to have a plan in case any unexpected health concerns pop up, as they can happen quickly during pregnancy. If you don't have access to an electronic health record, take a copy of your medical record with you. If any problems do arise during a road trip, Dr. Gaither recommends pregnant people contact their health care provider and the nearest hospital for advice, evaluation, and possible treatment.

11. Relax and Have Fun

There are lots of things to take into consideration when planning a road trip while pregnant, but always remember to have fun! Advanced planning and a comfortable wardrobe will help make the trip easier. Plan a trip you're excited about and indulge in a little pre-baby R&R.

Pregnant Travelers . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . 2022.

Blood Clots and Travel: What You Need to Know . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . 2023.

Travel During Pregnancy . American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists . 2023.

How Much Water Should I Drink During Pregnancy? . American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists . 2020.

If You're Pregnant: Seat Belt Recommendations for Drivers and Passengers . National Highway Traffic Safety Administration .

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Traveling while pregnant: Your complete guide

Unless you're nearing your due date or have certain complications, your healthcare provider will generally give you the green light for pregnancy travel. Here's how to safely explore – plus what to consider before making plans.

Layan Alrahmani, M.D.

Is traveling while pregnant safe?

When to avoid pregnancy travel, when is the best time to travel while you're pregnant , can pregnant women travel during covid, when should you stop traveling while pregnant, your pregnancy travel checklist, when to call your doctor while traveling.

Yes, it's generally safe to travel during pregnancy as long as you're not too close to your due date and you're not experiencing any serious pregnancy complications. There are special precautions to take, of course, and you may find yourself stopping to use the bathroom more than you're used to, but that babymoon can be within reach.

Before you pack your suitcase, talk with your healthcare provider to make sure it’s safe for you to travel and that your destination is a good choice. You'll want to avoid places where infectious diseases are prevalent (or there are high outbreaks of Zika or malaria, for example). The COVID-19 pandemic has made people reconsider where they feel safe traveling as well; if you're fully vaccinated, the CDC says you can travel Opens a new window , but it's always best to check with your doctor first.

And bear in mind that the activities you take part in might be different than normal – you'll want to skip the Scuba diving lessons, for example (though snorkeling is okay!).

It's safe to fly when you're pregnant as well, and most airlines will allow you to fly domestically until about 36 weeks of pregnancy. International routes may have different rules, so be sure to check with your airline before booking anything. Your doctor will tell you to avoid flying, however, if you have a health concern that might require emergency care or any other health conditions that aren’t well controlled.

It's best to avoid traveling while pregnant if you have any health conditions that can be life-threatening to both you or your baby. If you have any of the following conditions, your doctor will almost certainly advise you against travel:

  • Placental abruption  
  • Preeclampsia
  • You're in preterm or active labor
  • Cervical insufficiency  (incompetent cervix)
  • Premature rupture of membranes (PROM)
  • A suspected ectopic pregnancy
  • Vaginal bleeding

You might also need to be extra-cautious or skip travel if you're experiencing intrauterine growth restriction , you have placenta previa , or you have other conditions that may place your pregnancy at a higher risk. It’s always a good idea to discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider before travel regarding any medical conditions you have, and they'll be able to advise you on what's best, depending on the trip.

The sweet spot for pregnancy travel is during your second trimester , between 14 weeks and 27 weeks. By the second trimester, any struggles you’ve had with morning sickness and fatigue during the earlier weeks of pregnancy should have hopefully subsided – and after 12 weeks, your risk of miscarriage decreases significantly as well. And you're not too far along to worry about third trimester exhaustion or going into preterm labor yet, either.

Your energy levels are likely to be good during your second trimester too (bring on the sightseeing!), and it will still be relatively easy and comfortable for you to travel and move around at this time. Keep in mind that once you hit that third trimester, pregnancy travel might be more difficult as you find it harder to move around and stay still for long periods of time.

It's complicated (and often a personal decision based on your own risk factors), but the CDC says that if you're fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you can travel. Of course, it's important you still do everything you can to keep yourself and others around you safe, including following all mask-wearing and social distancing guidelines in the destination you visit.

Women are at an increased risk for severe illness if they contract COVID-19 while pregnant , and they're more likely to experience preterm birth and other poor pregnancy outcomes. (This is why the CDC, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine all recommend that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or are planning on becoming pregnant get the COVID vaccine .)

If you're vaccinated and decide to travel, the CDC advises avoiding international destinations that are designated Level 4, due to high rates of local COVID-19 transmission.

Take all this information into account and talk to your doctor before you decide on where and when to travel while you're pregnant. And if you experience any symptoms of COVID-19, whether while traveling or at home, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible.

The guidelines for when to stop traveling while you're pregnant vary based on your mode of travel, but more or less, you should wrap up travel before you're 36 weeks pregnant.

Most airlines will let pregnant women fly domestically until they're 36 weeks pregnant – and many cut that off earlier for international travel. This rule is often enforced on an honor system policy, but some airlines may ask for a doctor’s note – so make sure you have that from your healthcare provider if you're traveling in the third trimester, just in case.

Most cruise ships don't allow travel after 24 weeks of pregnancy. Some cruise lines' cutoff dates vary, so verify policies before booking a cruise.

As for road trips, there's no official deadline for when you need to stop traveling, but your personal comfort level (physically and emotionally) – and your doctor's advice – might help you decide. You can drive while pregnant all the way up until your due date, but things may get considerably less comfortable on longer trips as you approach full term.  

Travel of any kind requires advance preparation, but when you're pregnant and traveling, that pre-trip checklist gets a little longer. Give yourself a little more time than usual to plan for a trip – and use the tips below to stay safe and comfortable on your next adventure.

Before you travel

  • Talk to your healthcare provider to determine if your trip is safe for you and if there are any medical concerns to consider. It's a good idea to discuss any activities you plan to do while you're away too. If you're planning an international trip, make sure to ask about any vaccines you may need for the areas you're visiting.
  • Make sure you know your prenatal test schedule. Plan travels around any prenatal tests you need to schedule, including ultrasounds and other important screening tests.
  • Book an aisle seat. You'll likely be more comfortable being able to get up to stretch or go to the bathroom on longer flights.
  • Buy travel insurance. You don't need special travel insurance when you're pregnant, but it's never a bad idea to secure a policy. You may want to consider one with a “cancel for any reason” clause that reimburses you for money lost on cancelled trips for reasons (read: any reason) beyond what’s listed on the base policy. Check with your personal health insurance, too, to make sure it covers potential pregnancy complications while traveling internationally (some don’t). Consider adding evacuation insurance as part of a travel insurance plan, too.
  • Gather your medical records and health information . If you’re in your second or third trimester, ask your ob-gyn or midwife for a digital copy of your prenatal chart, and have that easily accessible during your trip. Typically, this chart includes your age, your blood type, the name and contact information for your healthcare provider, the date of your last menstrual period, your due date, information about any prior pregnancies, your risk factors for disease, results of pregnancy-related lab tests (including ultrasounds or other imaging tests), your medical and surgical history, and a record of vital signs taken at each visit.
  • Keep a list of key names and numbers you may need in the event of an emergency saved on your phone and written on a piece of paper (in case your battery dies).
  • Have a contingency plan for doctors and hospitals that will take your insurance where you're going in case you go into labor early or experience pregnancy complications that require urgent care while you're away from home.
  • Pack medicines and prenatal vitamins. That might include an extended supply of prescriptions and over-the-counter remedies , too. Bring enough to cover your entire trip and a written prescription that you can fill if you lose anything. It's a good idea to keep prescription medicine in its original container, so if your bags are searched it will be clear that you're not using medication without a prescription.
  • Prepare for the unexpected. On a road trip, that might mean an unexpected breakdown, so join an auto club that provides roadside assistance. Download any apps you use for renting cars and accessing boarding passes before you leave so you can easily reschedule things in the event of a last-minute cancellation.
  • If you're flying during your third trimester, be sure to call the airline to check about the cutoff week for pregnancy travel. A note from your doctor that says you’re cleared to travel is always good to have when traveling during your third trimester.

During your trip

  • Drink plenty of water and continue to eat healthy foods . Keep in mind that many restaurants abroad commonly serve unpasteurized foods (like soft cheeses and milk), which can be dangerous for pregnant women due to the presence of listeria.
  • Avoid eating raw or undercooked meat or fish , drinks with ice (which may be contaminated), non-bottled water, and other foods that can cause traveler's diarrhea, which can be more of a problem for pregnant women than other people.
  • On long flights and drives, take time to stretch by pulling over for a walk or strolling up and down the airplane aisle. And when seated, always wear your seat belt .
  • Maternity compression socks are handy to have along – both in transit and worn under your clothes while you’re out and about exploring – because they can ease the symptoms of swollen feet and legs. These are a few of our favorite pregnancy compression socks .
  • Take advantage of help. Many countries have dedicated lines in shops and airports for pregnant travelers, so don't feel any shame taking a shorter wait if you see one.
  • Go easy on yourself. Remember, you're growing a baby. You might not have quite the stamina for sightseeing and late nights like you used to pre-pregnancy. Make the most of your vacation but don't fret you miss out on things because you need more downtime from exploring than you usually would.
  • Don’t forget to get photos of your bump. When your baby is older, you'll have fun showing them all the places you traveled with them before they were born.
  • Go for the comfy shoes. Travel during pregnancy is the best reason ever to forgo those strappy stilettos for your favorite sneakers .
  • Pack snacks so you always have something to curb your appetite if there’s a long wait for a restaurant or you get stuck in transit or someplace remote with no food offerings.
  • Try to be in the moment with your travel partners as much as possible. Once your baby is born, your attention will be pulled in a whole new direction.

If you have any medical concerns traveling while pregnant, don’t hesitate to pick up the phone and call your doctor for advice. The below are a few symptoms that definitely warrant calling your ob-gyn or health care provider or seeking emergency care while traveling or at home:

  • Signs of pre-term labor (including a constant, low dull backache, bleeding, etc.)
  • Ruptured membranes (your water breaks)
  • Severe cramping
  • Spiking blood pressure
  • Severe nausea or vomiting
  • COVID-19 symptoms

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BabyCenter's editorial team is committed to providing the most helpful and trustworthy pregnancy and parenting information in the world. When creating and updating content, we rely on credible sources: respected health organizations, professional groups of doctors and other experts, and published studies in peer-reviewed journals. We believe you should always know the source of the information you're seeing. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies .

AAFP. 2020. Ultrasound during pregnancy. American Academy of Family Physicians.  https://familydoctor.org/ultrasound-during-pregnancy/ Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

ACOG. 2020. FAQ055: Travel during pregnancy. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.  https://www.acog.org/womens-health/faqs/travel-during-pregnancy Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

CDC. 2019. Pregnant Travelers. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/family-travel/pregnant-travelers Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

CDC. 2022. Domestic Travel During Covid-19. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/travel-during-covid19.html Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

CDC 2023. International Travel During Covid-19. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/international-travel-during-covid19.html Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

CDC. 2022. Covid-19: Pregnant and Recently Pregnant People. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/pregnant-people.html Opens a new window [Accessed April 2023]

Terry Ward

Terry Ward is a freelance travel, health, and parenting writer who has covered everything from flying with toddlers to why you should travel with your kids even when they're too young to remember it. She lives in Tampa, Florida, with her husband and their young son and daughter, and enjoys camping, sailing, scuba diving, skiing, and almost anything else done in the great outdoors.

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Travel During Pregnancy

As long as there are no identified complications or concerns with your pregnancy, it is generally safe to travel during your pregnancy. The ideal time to travel during pregnancy is the second trimester .  In most cases, you are past the morning sickness of the first trimester and several weeks from the third stage of pregnancy when you are more easily fatigued .

Is it safe to travel during pregnancy?

Traveling by air is considered safe for women while they are pregnant; however, the following ideas might make your trip safer and more comfortable.

  • Most airlines allow pregnant women to travel through their eighth month. Traveling during the ninth month is usually allowed if there is permission from your health care provider.
  • Most airlines have narrow aisles and smaller bathrooms, which makes it more challenging to walk and more uncomfortable when using the restroom. Because of potential turbulence that could shake the plane, make sure you are holding on to the seatbacks while navigating the aisle.
  • You may want to choose an aisle seat which will allow you to get up more easily to reach the restroom or just to stretch your legs and back.
  • Travel on major airlines with pressurized cabins and avoid smaller private planes. If you must ride in smaller planes, avoid altitudes above 7,000 feet.
  • Although doubtful, the risk of DVT can be further reduced by wearing compression stockings.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the International Air Travel Association recommend that expecting mothers in an uncomplicated pregnancy avoid travel from the 37th week of pregnancy through birth. Avoiding travel from 32 weeks through birth is recommended for women who have complicated pregnancies with risk factors for premature labor, such as mothers carrying multiples.

Risk factors that warrant travel considerations include the following:

  • Severe anemia
  • Cardiac disease
  • Respiratory disease
  • Recent hemorrhage
  • Current or recent bone fractures

Traveling by Sea During Pregnancy

Traveling by sea is generally safe for women while they are pregnant; the motion of the boat may accentuate any morning sickness or make you feel nauseous all over again. There are a few considerations to make your trip safer and more comfortable:

  • Check with the cruise line to ensure that there is a health care provider on board in case there are any pregnancy complications .
  • Review the route and port-of-calls to identify if there is access to any medical facilities if needed.
  • Make sure any medications for seasickness are approved for women who are pregnant and that there is no risk to the developing baby.
  • Seasickness bands use acupressure points to help prevent upset stomach and maybe a good alternative to medication.

International Travel During Pregnancy

Traveling overseas has the same considerations that local or domestic travel has, but it also has additional concerns that you need to know about before making an international trip. The information below is provided to help you assess whether an international trip is good for you at this time:

  • It is important to talk with your health care provider before you take a trip internationally to discuss safety factors for you and your baby.
  • Discuss immunizations with your health care provider and carry a copy of your health records with you.
  • With international travel, you may be exposed to a disease that is rare here in the United States but is common in the country you visit.
  • Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at (800) 311-3435 or visit their website at www.cdc.gov to receive safety information along with immunization facts related to your travels.
  • Diarrhea is a common concern when traveling overseas because you may not be used to the germs and organisms found in the food and water of other countries. This can lead to a problem of dehydration .

Here are some tips to avoid diarrhea and help keep you safe:

  • Drink plenty of bottled water
  • Used canned juices or soft drinks as alternatives
  • Make sure the milk is pasteurized
  • Avoid fresh fruits and vegetables unless they have been cooked or can be peeled (such as an orange or a banana)
  • Make certain that all meat and fish has been cooked completely; if you are unsure, do not eat it

Travel Tips During Pregnancy

Whether you are going by car, bus, or train, it is generally safe to travel while you are pregnant; however, there are some things to consider that could make your trip safer and more comfortable.

  • It is essential to buckle-up every time you ride in a car. Make sure that you use both the lap and shoulder belts for the best protection of you and your baby.
  • Keep the airbags turned on. The safety benefits of the airbag outweigh any potential risk to you and your baby.
  • Buses tend to have narrow aisles and small restrooms. This mode of transportation can be more challenging.  The safest thing is to remain seated while the bus is moving. If you must use the restroom, make sure to hold on to the rail or seats to keep your balance.
  • Trains usually have more room to navigate and walk. The restrooms are usually small. It is essential to hold on to rails or seat backs while the train is moving.
  • Try to limit the amount of time you are cooped up in the car, bus, or train. Keep travel time around five to six hours.
  • Use rest stops to take short walks and to do stretches to keep the blood circulating.
  • Dress comfortably in loose cotton clothing and wear comfortable shoes.
  • Take your favorite pillow.
  • Plan for plenty of rest stops, restroom breaks and stretches.
  • Carry snack foods with you.
  • If you are traveling any distance, make sure to carry a copy of your prenatal records.
  • Enjoy the trip.

Want to Know More?

  • How to Treat Jet Lag Naturally During Pregnancy

Compiled using information from the following sources:

1. Planning Your Pregnancy and Birth Third Ed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Ch. 5. William’s Obstetrics Twenty-Second Ed. Cunningham, F. Gary, et al, Ch. 8.

2. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Air Travel and Pregnancy (Scientific Impact Paper No. 1), https://www.rcog.org/uk, May 22, 2013.

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how far into pregnancy can you travel by car

Traveling during pregnancy can be both exciting and overwhelming. As the due date approaches, many expectant mothers wonder how far they can travel by car before it becomes unsafe. The good news is that in most cases, pregnant women can travel by car safely until the later stages of their pregnancy. However, it is essential to take certain precautions and listen to your body to ensure a smooth and comfortable journey. So, let's explore how far into pregnancy you can travel by car and what factors to consider for a safe and stress-free trip.

What You'll Learn

How far into pregnancy is it safe to travel by car, are there any specific trimesters when it is advised to avoid traveling by car during pregnancy, what are the potential risks associated with traveling long distances by car during pregnancy, are there any precautions or measures that pregnant women should take when traveling by car, regardless of the stage of pregnancy, are there any signs or symptoms that pregnant women should watch out for during car travel that may indicate a potential problem.

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Traveling during pregnancy is a common concern for many women. Whether it's for work or personal reasons, there may come a time when you need to travel by car while pregnant. It's natural to wonder how far into pregnancy it is safe to travel and what precautions should be taken. This article aims to provide information and guidance on this topic, based on scientific research, expert advice, and personal experiences.

First and foremost, it's important to consult with your healthcare provider before making any travel plans during pregnancy. They will be able to give you personalized recommendations based on your specific circumstances, medical history, and any existing pregnancy complications.

In general, traveling by car during pregnancy is considered safe for most women. However, there are certain factors to consider and precautions to take to ensure a comfortable and safe journey. The following steps can be followed for a worry-free car trip while pregnant:

Step 1: Timing is crucial. The safest time to travel by car during pregnancy is generally during the second trimester, between weeks 14 and 28. By this time, most of the common pregnancy discomforts, such as morning sickness and fatigue, have subsided, and the risk of miscarriage or preterm labor is lower compared to the first and third trimesters.

Step 2: Plan your route carefully. Avoid long drives that require excessive sitting or uncomfortable positions. Opt for shorter distances and regular breaks to stretch your legs, use the restroom, and maintain good circulation. It's also important to choose routes with good quality roads to minimize the risk of accidents or discomfort caused by bumpy rides.

Step 3: Wear your seatbelt properly. Contrary to popular belief, wearing a seatbelt is essential for both the safety of the mother and the unborn baby. The seatbelt should be positioned low across the hips, not above or on the belly, and the shoulder strap should be placed between the breasts and to the side of the belly. This ensures maximum protection while avoiding any pressure on the uterus.

Step 4: Stay hydrated and eat light snacks. Dehydration can lead to fatigue and discomfort, so it's essential to drink plenty of water throughout the journey. It's also advisable to have light and easily digestible snacks on hand to prevent low blood sugar levels and keep you energized.

Step 5: Take frequent breaks and stretch. Prolonged sitting can increase the risk of blood clots and general discomfort. Make it a point to take breaks every one to two hours to walk around, stretch your legs, and do some gentle exercises. This will help improve blood circulation and reduce the risk of swelling and cramps.

Step 6: Consider your comfort. Pack comfortable clothing, including loose-fitting and breathable garments, to ensure maximum comfort during the car ride. Bring pillows and cushions to support your back, neck, and hips if needed. Adjust the temperature inside the car to your preference to avoid overheating or getting too cold.

While traveling during pregnancy is generally safe, it's important to be aware of any warning signs or symptoms that may indicate a problem. If you experience severe abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, fluid leakage, or decreased fetal movements, it's crucial to seek immediate medical attention.

In conclusion, traveling by car during pregnancy can be safe and comfortable if certain precautions are taken. Consult with your healthcare provider, plan your route carefully, wear your seatbelt properly, stay hydrated and well-nourished, take breaks and stretch frequently, and prioritize your comfort. By following these steps, you can enjoy your journey while keeping yourself and your baby safe.

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Pregnancy is a sensitive time, and it is important for expectant mothers to take extra precautions to ensure the safety of themselves and their unborn child. Traveling during pregnancy, especially by car, can raise concerns for many women. However, there are no specific trimesters when it is advised to completely avoid traveling by car. Nevertheless, there are certain factors to consider during each trimester to make car travel safer for pregnant women.

First Trimester:

During the first trimester, many women experience morning sickness and fatigue, which can make car travel uncomfortable. However, this does not mean that travel should be completely avoided. It is important to listen to your body and take breaks if needed. If you are experiencing severe morning sickness, it may be advisable to postpone long car trips until you feel better.

Second Trimester:

The second trimester is often considered the safest time to travel during pregnancy. Most women have typically overcome morning sickness by this stage, and the risk of miscarriage is significantly reduced. However, it is still important to prioritize comfort and safety during car travel. Wear comfortable clothing and make sure to adjust the seat and seatbelt properly to accommodate your growing belly.

Third Trimester:

During the third trimester, car travel can become more challenging due to the increase in bodily changes and discomfort. The risk of pre-term labor is also higher in the last few weeks of pregnancy. However, this does not mean that traveling by car should be completely avoided. It is recommended to discuss travel plans with your healthcare provider and follow their advice. They may suggest shorter trips or advise against car travel altogether if there are any complications or concerns.

Tips for Safe Car Travel During Pregnancy:

  • Always wear your seatbelt: It is crucial to wear your seatbelt properly throughout your pregnancy. The lap belt should be placed under the belly, across the hips, and the shoulder belt should be positioned between the breasts and to the side of the belly.
  • Take frequent breaks: Sitting for long periods can increase the risk of blood clots and discomfort. Plan your journey with frequent breaks so you can stretch your legs, use the restroom, and give yourself a chance to move around.
  • Stay hydrated and pack snacks: It is important to stay hydrated during pregnancy, especially when traveling. Keep a bottle of water within reach and pack healthy snacks to maintain your energy levels.
  • Adjust the seat and position: Make sure to adjust the seat position to provide adequate legroom and support your back. Use cushions or pillows to provide additional comfort and support.
  • Avoid unnecessary travel: While there are no specific trimesters to avoid car travel, it is advisable to avoid unnecessary travel, especially to remote areas or locations with limited medical facilities.
  • Listen to your body: Pay attention to any signs of discomfort or fatigue during car travel. If needed, take breaks, change positions, or even consider postponing the trip if you feel unwell.

In conclusion, there are no specific trimesters when it is advised to avoid traveling by car during pregnancy. However, it is important for expectant mothers to take certain precautions and prioritize their comfort and safety during each trimester. By following these tips and consulting with your healthcare provider, you can make car travel safer and more enjoyable during pregnancy.

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Traveling long distances by car during pregnancy can pose several potential risks to both the expectant mother and the baby. It is important for pregnant women to carefully consider these risks and take necessary precautions before embarking on a long car journey.

One potential risk associated with traveling long distances by car during pregnancy is the increased risk of blood clots. Sitting for extended periods of time in a car can lead to reduced blood flow, especially in the lower extremities. This can potentially increase the risk of developing blood clots, a condition known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Blood clots can be dangerous as they can travel to the lungs and cause a life-threatening condition called pulmonary embolism.

To minimize the risk of blood clots, pregnant women should take frequent breaks during the journey, ideally every 1-2 hours, to stretch their legs and promote blood circulation. It is also recommended to wear loose-fitting clothing and comfortable shoes to allow for adequate blood flow. Additionally, staying hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids can help reduce the risk of blood clots.

Another potential risk of traveling long distances by car during pregnancy is the increased likelihood of fatigue and discomfort. Sitting in the same position for extended periods can lead to back pain, leg cramps, and overall discomfort. Moreover, the stress of driving, navigating, and dealing with traffic can further contribute to fatigue and exhaustion.

To minimize these risks, pregnant women should prioritize their comfort and well-being during the journey. They can use supportive cushions or pillows to maintain a comfortable posture and reduce the strain on their back. Wearing loose-fitting and breathable clothing can also help alleviate discomfort. It is important to listen to your body and take breaks or even consider sharing the driving responsibilities with a partner or friend.

In addition to physical risks, there are also potential psychological risks associated with traveling long distances by car during pregnancy. The stress and anxiety of traveling in unfamiliar surroundings, dealing with potential delays or roadblocks, and being away from familiar medical facilities can lead to increased stress levels.

To mitigate these risks, pregnant women should plan the trip carefully and ensure that they are well-prepared. This includes identifying nearby medical facilities and emergency contacts, carrying necessary medications and medical documents, and discussing the travel plans with their healthcare provider before embarking on the journey. It may also be helpful to have a support system in place, such as a travel companion or someone who can provide assistance during the journey.

In conclusion, traveling long distances by car during pregnancy can pose several potential risks, including an increased risk of blood clots, fatigue, discomfort, and psychological stress. It is important for pregnant women to take necessary precautions, such as taking frequent breaks, staying hydrated, prioritizing comfort, and planning the trip carefully. By doing so, they can minimize these risks and ensure a safe and enjoyable journey.

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When traveling by car, pregnant women should take certain precautions to ensure their safety and the safety of their unborn baby. It is important to consider these precautions regardless of the stage of pregnancy. Here is a guide on the measures pregnant women should take when traveling by car.

  • Wear a seatbelt: Pregnant women should always wear a seatbelt when traveling in a car. The seatbelt should be fastened across the chest and below the abdomen, ensuring a snug fit. The lap portion of the seatbelt should be placed under the bump and across the upper thighs. This helps to protect both the mother and the baby in case of an accident.
  • Adjust the seat and steering wheel: Pregnant women should adjust the seat and steering wheel to ensure a comfortable driving position. The seat should be positioned in a way that provides enough legroom and allows the pregnant woman to fully extend her legs without straining. The steering wheel should be adjusted to a position that enables the woman to hold it comfortably, with a slight bend in the elbow.
  • Take frequent breaks: Long periods of sitting in the car can lead to discomfort and even blood clots in pregnant women. It is important to take frequent breaks to stretch the legs and improve circulation. Ideally, pregnant women should take a break every 1-2 hours and walk around for a few minutes. This can help reduce the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
  • Stay hydrated: Pregnant women should ensure that they stay well hydrated during car trips. Dehydration can lead to fatigue, dizziness, and other complications. It is recommended to drink plenty of water and avoid caffeinated beverages. If necessary, plan stops at rest areas with restroom facilities for bathroom breaks and hydration.
  • Avoid sudden movements: Pregnant women should avoid sudden movements such as sharp turns, sudden braking, or acceleration. These movements can jolt the uterus and potentially harm the baby. It is important to drive cautiously and smoothly, allowing for ample reaction time and following the traffic laws.
  • Use pillows for support: As pregnancy progresses, it can be challenging to find a comfortable position while sitting in a car for an extended period. Using pillows for back and neck support can help alleviate discomfort and minimize strain. Pregnant women can bring along a small pillow or cushion to provide additional support and make the ride more comfortable.
  • Plan the routes and schedule wisely: When traveling long distances, pregnant women should plan their routes and schedule wisely. Avoid rush hour traffic and plan regular stops for breaks and meals. It is important to give enough time for rest and to avoid unnecessary stress while driving.

Remember, each pregnancy is unique, and it is always a good idea for pregnant women to consult with their healthcare provider before planning a car trip, especially during the later stages of pregnancy. They can provide personalized advice based on the individual's medical history and current condition.

In conclusion, pregnant women should prioritize their safety and the safety of their unborn baby when traveling by car. Following the precautions mentioned above, such as wearing a seatbelt correctly, taking frequent breaks, staying hydrated, and avoiding sudden movements, can help ensure a safe and comfortable journey. By taking these measures, pregnant women can enjoy their car trip while minimizing any potential risks.

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During pregnancy, many women may have concerns about traveling by car and whether it is safe for both themselves and their unborn child. While car travel is generally considered safe during pregnancy, there are some signs and symptoms that pregnant women should watch out for that may indicate a potential problem. By being aware of these warning signs, pregnant women can take necessary precautions and seek medical attention if needed.

One of the most common concerns while traveling by car during pregnancy is the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot that forms in the deep veins of the legs or pelvis. Pregnant women are at an increased risk of DVT due to changes in their blood flow and hormonal levels. Symptoms of DVT may include swelling, pain, warmth, or redness in the affected leg. If a pregnant woman experiences any of these symptoms, she should stop and seek medical attention immediately.

Another potential problem that pregnant women should watch out for during car travel is preterm labor. Preterm labor is defined as regular contractions that occur before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Some warning signs of preterm labor may include uterine contractions that occur more than six times in an hour, lower backache that is persistent or rhythmic, pelvic pressure, increased vaginal discharge, or a change in the type of discharge experienced. If a pregnant woman experiences any of these symptoms, it is important to stop and rest, empty the bladder, and drink water. If the symptoms persist or worsen, medical attention should be sought.

In addition to DVT and preterm labor, pregnant women should also watch out for any signs of preeclampsia while traveling by car. Preeclampsia is a serious condition that can develop during pregnancy and is characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Symptoms of preeclampsia may include swelling of the hands, feet, or face, severe headaches, vision changes, upper abdominal pain, or vomiting. If a pregnant woman experiences any of these symptoms, it is important to stop and seek immediate medical attention.

To ensure a safe and comfortable car journey during pregnancy, there are some steps that pregnant women can take. It is recommended to wear comfortable clothing and footwear, as well as to position the seatbelt properly across the hips and below the belly. Pregnant women should also take regular breaks to stretch and walk around, as well as to drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. If possible, it is best to have someone else drive and avoid long journeys.

As with any pregnancy-related concerns, it is essential to consult with a healthcare provider before undertaking any car travel. They can provide personalized advice based on a woman's individual medical history and circumstances. By being aware of potential warning signs and taking necessary precautions, pregnant women can safely enjoy travel by car while minimizing risks to themselves and their unborn child.

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Frequently asked questions.

You can generally travel by car throughout most of your pregnancy. It is generally safe to travel by car until you are around 36 weeks pregnant. After this point, many airlines and travel companies may restrict your ability to travel due to the potential risks associated with flying or being far away from medical assistance. It's important to consult with your healthcare provider before making any travel plans.

While traveling long distances by car is generally safe during pregnancy, it's important to take certain precautions. Make sure to wear your seatbelt properly, positioning the lap belt low across your hips and under your belly, and the shoulder belt across your chest between your breasts. It's also a good idea to take breaks every couple of hours to stretch your legs and walk around to improve circulation. Stay properly hydrated and bring along any necessary medication or prenatal vitamins.

There are a few potential risks to traveling by car during pregnancy, but they are generally minimal. Extended periods of sitting can increase the risk of blood clots, so it's important to take breaks to walk around and stretch. Car accidents can also pose a risk, so always wear your seatbelt properly and drive defensively. Additionally, long hours in a car can be uncomfortable and increase the risk of swelling and discomfort, so try to find ways to stay comfortable during your journey.

If you have a high-risk pregnancy, it's important to consult with your healthcare provider before making any travel plans. Depending on the specific risks involved in your pregnancy, your healthcare provider may recommend avoiding long trips or provide specific guidelines for staying safe during travel. It's always best to err on the side of caution and seek medical advice before embarking on any significant travel during a high-risk pregnancy.

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Pregnancy Travel Tips

Medical review policy, latest update:, can you travel while pregnant , read this next, when should you stop traveling while pregnant, how should you prepare for a trip during pregnancy, what do pregnant women need to know about travel and the zika virus, travel tips for pregnant people, when should you seek medical care while traveling during pregnancy.

While traveling during pregnancy is generally considered safe for most moms-to-be, you’ll need to take some precautions before making any plans — and get the green light from your practitioner first.

What to Expect When You’re Expecting , 5th edition, Heidi Murkoff. WhatToExpect.com, Zika Virus and Pregnancy , October 2020. WhatToExpect.com, What to Know About COVID-19 if You’re Pregnant , February 2021. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Travel During Pregnancy , August 2020. Johns Hopkins Medicine, Traveling While Pregnant or Breastfeeding , 2021. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 Travel Recommendations by Destination , May 2021. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnant and Recently Pregnant People , May 2021. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnant Travelers , December 2020. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers , April 2021. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 and Cruise Ship Travel , March 2020.

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Travelling by car while pregnant: 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, etc.

You’re pregnant but are still dreaming of a road trip with your family? You’re wondering whether it’s wise to take the road during your pregnancy? You’re worried about possible contraindications? These are all normal questions to ask as you head off to your chosen holiday destination. Little Guest has investigated to help you sort out what is true and what is not, and what precautions you should take before embarking on a road trip while your baby is still growing in your belly. Explanations month by month, advice and hotels adapted to your needs… follow the guide!

pregnant-woman-driving-car

Let’s cut the suspense short, the car is not the best means of transport when you are pregnant. However, it is perfectly possible to take to the road if your pregnancy is going well . Although the concentration required for safe driving and the jolts caused by the journey can increase certain common inconveniences (fatigue, nausea, bloating, etc.), the car remains an appropriate means of transport when you are pregnant … at least until the third trimester of pregnancy. We’ll explain everything a little further down!

ANSWERS TO THE MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is it risky to drive while pregnant?

We might as well say it straight away, pregnancy specialists, gynaecologists, midwives, obstetricians and others are categorical: no scientific evidence has shown that a car journey can cause problems during pregnancy or lead to premature delivery. So, while driving does not seem to have any impact on possible complications, it is obviously advisable to take a few precautions before you hit the road:

  • Make sure you place the lower strap of the seatbelt as low as possible, at the level of the upper thighs, under the abdomen , to avoid unnecessary pressure, and the upper strap, as usual, between the breasts.
  • Move your seat as far back as possible to stretch your legs comfortably, adjust the steering wheel to keep it as far away from your stomach as possible, and provide a cushion to support your back (or even a pillow for your neck) during the journey.
  • Avoid rapid acceleration, hard braking and poor road conditions as much as possible to minimise jolting and improper movement.
  • Plan regular breaks (one every 1.5 hours or so) to stretch your legs, wear light, comfortable clothing that you feel comfortable in and hydrate as regularly as possible.
  • Before leaving, do not hesitate to inform your doctor or gynaecologist of your plans in order to get his or her opinion. After your arrival, do not hesitate to take a whole day to rest .

Until what month of pregnancy can I travel by car?

Driving for hours to your holiday destination can make you tired. Sitting down is not at all comfortable and we all tend to strain our legs when we drive. Between this excessive strain on the leg muscles, the jolts caused by bumpy roads, and the stress of the journey in general, your uterus can be a bit of a mess . This can lead to increased contractions, which can be quite unpleasant in the long run.

The risk of spontaneous miscarriage is highest during the first trimester of pregnancy – about one in five pregnancies – and the inconveniences inherent in any pregnancy (nausea, fatigue, etc.) are most noticeable. Driving at this time may increase your discomfort and is therefore not recommended, even though your health is not at risk !

During the third trimester, and more particularly the last month and a half of pregnancy , the risk of premature delivery increases and the contractions become longer and more painful. It is therefore easy to understand that this is not the ideal time to take to the road either, especially as it would be a shame to find yourself on the motorway when your water breaks .

As you can see, the best time to travel by car is during the second trimester , more precisely between the 12 th and 26 th week of pregnancy. Nausea and fatigue will be a thing of the past and the risk of premature delivery will still be very low!

What documents should you not forget before setting off?

Everything is ready for the big departure but you are afraid to forget something important? No problem, Little Guest has put together a short list of essentials that you should definitely pack. Good to know : this list also works if you want to fly during your pregnancy or travel by train while pregnant .

  • Your complete medical file containing your latest ultrasound and blood tests and your blood group card .
  • A medical certificate attesting to your pregnancy, your health insurance card and, if necessary, your European health insurance card (this could be very useful in the event of an unexpected visit or delivery within the European Union or in Switzerland).
  • Your vaccination booklet .
  • A first-aid kit containing everything that can be used during pregnancy: antispasmodics in case of contractions, iron to prevent anaemia, anti-acid medicine to avoid acid reflux, anti-diarrhoea medicine, paracetamol for headaches and a thermometer.
  • Also remember to write down the number of your GP and/or gynaecologist so that you have it to hand in case of need.

Don’t forget that self-medication is strongly discouraged during pregnancy , so if you hesitate to take any medication, contact your GP! Finally, find out about the medical facilities near your holiday destination (emergency room, obstetrics service, nearest doctor, etc.), this will avoid stress and allow you to enjoy your stay in peace.

INFORMATION AND ADVICE ACCORDING TO YOUR MONTH OF PREGNANCY

Travelling by car when you are 1 month pregnant

This is it; a magnificent adventure is starting and it will last 9 months; 9 months during which your life will be made up of small joys, great fears and, above all, many surprises. For the moment, nothing really changes, neither physically nor psychologically. You may experience some morning sickness , but this is completely normal and does not pose any risk. You can therefore travel without question because it is not dangerous for your baby’s development.

Travelling by car when you are 2 months pregnant

From the second month of pregnancy, you enter an important period; the first organs of your embryo start to form . At the same time, the embryo begins its journey and settles on the endometrium (the lining of the womb). This is a time that can affect your behaviour as the pregnancy hormones double every day! It is therefore quite normal, for example, for you to feel tired or irritated. Nausea, acid reflux and heartburn increase and it is likely that mood swings have started to appear. The risk of miscarriage is still high but you can travel by car if you take the necessary precautions.

Travelling by car when you are 3 months pregnant

The third month of pregnancy is the time of the first ultrasound! The little embryo officially becomes a foetus and the risk of miscarriage decreases considerably . On the other hand, nausea and vomiting, as well as the urge to urinate, may intensify. This is because your uterus is growing and putting constant pressure on your bladder. Car journeys can therefore be quite difficult , so allow plenty of time to take as many breaks as you need. Also, note that the third month of pregnancy lends itself perfectly to various types of prenatal massage that may help you relax and enjoy this joyous time!

Travelling by car when you are 4 months pregnant

You are now in your 4 th month of pregnancy and your belly is slowly starting to round out to make room for your growing baby. Normally, the nausea has disappeared and you have left the fatigue behind you! You’re in great shape and that’s good! Why not celebrate with a few days of holiday , away from the daily grind? It’s the ideal time to take a breath of fresh air and prepare yourself for the rest of your pregnancy! A few precautions, however: hydrate regularly and take regular breaks to stretch your legs and regulate your blood circulation .

pregnant-woman-car-driving-on-her-belly

Travelling by car when you are 5 months pregnant

The 5 th month of pregnancy has arrived and your baby is now ready to be heard, or rather, understood! Kicking, punching… he never stops reminding you of his presence in your now well-rounded belly ! Fortunately for you, his movements tire him out and he rests most of the day (between 18 and 20 hours a day). The problem is that you don’t have the same rhythm as he does and this restlessness can lead to great fatigue. Even if you love driving, consider leaving the wheel to someone else , at least from time to time, so that you can rest on the passenger side. Don’t hesitate to take naps and sleep whenever you can, as your baby’s health obviously depends on yours.

Travelling by car when you are 6 months pregnant

Your belly is getting bigger and bigger and you are suffering from temporary hot flashes and unusual sweating? It’s normal, the 6 th month of pregnancy is the time when your body adapts to the growing foetus and this can cause many hormonal changes . In everyday life, and especially when driving, remember to hydrate regularly and wear loose, light clothing that will give you maximum freedom of movement and comfort. During the journey, remember to take breaks more regularly than before. Take the opportunity to hydrate, eat a small snack and take a few steps to avoid the feeling of heavy legs and to promote blood circulation.

Travelling by car when you are 7 months pregnant

Here you are in your 7 th month of pregnancy, you’ve come a long way! Even though childbirth is starting to settle in a corner of your mind, there is nothing to stop you from continuing to travel ! Indeed, even though your baby is becoming more and more sensitive to what is happening around him, he is completely safe. Are you, on the other hand, beginning to be a little embarrassed by the size of your belly and fearing shocks? This is normal and it may be time for you to let someone else drive for good ; an opportunity for you to sit back and enjoy the scenery. As with all forms of transport, remember to fasten your seatbelt under your abdomen to avoid any risk of impact. As in previous months, remember to walk as regularly as possible to keep your legs, ankles, feet and toes working.

Travelling by car when you are 8 months pregnant

This is it, you’re almost there! You’re getting close to giving birth , and it could well be premature from the beginning of the 8 th month. To find out whether you are fit to travel during the 8 th and 9 th months, whether by plane, train or car (over long distances), ask your doctor or midwife who has been following you since the beginning of your pregnancy for advice. If it is advisable to avoid travelling during this period , you are the only one to decide and you have every right to do so! As labour can start at any time during the last few weeks, we recommend that you limit your travel to short trips that allow you to get home or to the hospital easily.

pregnant-woman-in-car

3 LUXURY HOTELS EASILY ACCESSIBLE BY CAR FOR (FUTURE) MOTHERS

Le Chabichou ***** – Savoie, France

A true luxury cocoon nestled in the heart of Courchevel, Le Chabichou ***** is absolutely perfect for expectant mothers looking for peace and relaxation. Easily accessible by car, it guarantees direct access to the Trois-Vallées ski area and offers sumptuous views of the surrounding mountains.

This charming chalet, opened in 1963 and completely renovated in 2019, is equally suitable for summer and winter holidays. With a superb spa , a double Michelin-starred restaurant and kids’ clubs for young children and teenagers, the Chabichou is ideal for an enchanted break in the mountains.

Dolce la Hulpe **** – Walloon Brabant, Belgium

Head to Belgium to discover an intimate address in the heart of the flat country. Head for Walloon Brabant to discover the Dolce la Hulpe **** . This hotel curled up in luxurious nature, at the edge of UNESCO-registered Fôret de Soignes, offers its guests a successful marriage of luxury, comfort and authenticity. Nestled only 29 km from Brussels , this hotel is easily accessible by car!

Country walks and gastronomic dining experience are on the menu, but its mostly its Spa Cinq Mondes that catches the highlights. Its wide range of cares, including massages and Japanese, Balinese and Indians rituals, is ideal for smooth pregnancy treatments. Its heated pool, its sauna and its hammam complete the offer of this elegant and fully-equipped resort. The Dolce la Hulpe is the ideal place to enjoy the Belgian countryside and live your pregnancy in peace.

Hôtel Chais Monnet & Spa ***** – Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France

The Hôtel Chais Monnet & Spa ***** promises the most relaxing stay in Western France . Stretch your legs and get pampered as much as you want in this high-end wellness-oriented resort . Manicures, special treatment cares or sauna will relax you from the fatigue of the trip so you can drown in a soothing and voluptuous feeling. The bucolic setting of the town of Cognac suits perfectly for a more laid-back rythm of life made of walks along the Charente river , visits to la Rochelle and Rochefort or idleness on the pool’s sunbeds .

Indeed, at Little Guest we know that pregnancy can sometimes be quite tiring and that is exactly why this hotel is ideal for pregnant women. Sometimes, nothing better than to cut from daily stress to fill the tank of harmony in these constantly-evolving moments. The Hôtel Chais Monnet & Spa ***** is easily accessible by car and boasts with amazing activities both for those expecting a happy event as well as children, on the verge of endless fun at the resort’s kids-club .

A FEW MORE TIPS

  • To help you prepare for your trip, consider our article specially designed for family car travel .
  • And when baby arrives, how will you find the perfect hotel? The answer is obvious! Here you will find a selection of cities and hotels that are particularly suitable for the first holiday with a baby .

Little Guest wishes you a pleasant pregnancy and an unforgettable holiday!

Guillaume-Guivaudon-Little-Guest

Guillaume , 27 years old, travel enthusiast, from Paris

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Travelling at 8 Months Pregnant – What To Expect

can you travel 8 months pregnant by car

  Updated : This post Travelling in 8 months pregnancy has been updated on November 2023 with new and relevant information.

Travelling In Pregnancy Guide

Travelling in your final trimester of pregnancy is not like the normal travelling, where you set of backpacking and are full of active energy.

In fact it takes a lot of dedication to begin with.

Depending on what your hormones are feeling like.

It also requires some pre and post planning.

Is It Safe To Travel at 8 months pregnant?

With the right precautions in place, most women can travel safely during their pregnancy.

If you are travelling in your final trimester, it’s best to be extra prepared.

the first 3 months have a higher risk of miscarriage, which is why alot of travelling is not recommened.

The second trimester is the best phase to travel, since most women are full of energy during this stage, they find travelling to be smooth too.

The final trimester again is lurking towards your final due date, so being extra careful during this phase is a must.

Wherever you decide to travel, find out what healthcare facilities are at your destination in case you need urgent medical attention.

It’s a good idea to take your maternity medical records with you, just in case you require urgent medical care.

It all depends where your travelling to. Is it local, out of town or abroad.

Each journey will require it’s own planning.

Can travelling during pregnancy harm the baby?

Generally, traveling during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and baby. However, it’s important to consult with your healthcare provider before making any travel plans. They can provide personalized advice based on your specific health needs and the stage of your pregnancy.

Are Long Travel Journeys Safe For Pregnancy?

Dpeending on your overall health condition in pregnancy ofcourse.

First thing to do is consult with your health care proffessional.

They will be able to guide you accordingly due to knowing the previuos history of your pregnancy.

It also depends on what way you will be travelling in. Is it car, bus, train, plane.

All sources of transportation will have their own affects on each pregnancy differently.

The best way to travel in your final trimester according to health professionals in train.

This is due to the low level of rapid movement felt during the journey.

Can A 8 Month Pregnant Woman Fly – Flying In Pregnancy

Flying isn’t harmful to you or your baby.

Most airlines will not let you fly after week 37 of pregnancy, because fter 37 weeks of pregnancy baby can be born anytime.

If you are having a multiple pregnancy’s then it’s usually from 32 onwards most airlines deny.

Depending on the urgency of your travel, the midwife will be able to advise better, depending on your health and severity of travel.

You can also check the policy of the airline you will be travelling with.

Usually if it’s a short distance (less then 4 hours), they may allow you to travel even later on.https://www.youtube.com/embed/xvc7za6oDQk?feature=oembed

Travelling By Car During Pregnancy

Car journey’s are probably the most common ways a women travels in pregnancy.

It’s actually recommended to avoid long car journeys if you’re pregnant.

If that’s possible ofcourse.

Pregnancy Driving Restrictions

Due to the fact that road accidents are among the most common causes of injuries in pregnant women, it’s also one of the main reasons it’s restricted.

To keep safe during car journeys you can:

  • Try and be the passenger and do less of the driving
  • Always travel with somebody
  • When your stationary, you can do some exercises in the car, such as flexing, stretching and rotating your feet and wiggling your toes – This will keep the blood flowing through your legs and reduce any stiffness and discomfort.
  • If you are in your third trimester, you can wear compression stockings while on long car journeys. Compression stockings help prevent blood clots.
  • Keep hydrated and keep snacking to avoid dizziness, fatigue and nausea.
  • Keep air circulating in the car by leaving the window slightly open.
  • Always wear your seatbelt. Even though it can be discomforting, it’s important. Instead of wearing the lap strap across your bump, wear it under your bump. The belt will be more comfy this way.

Travelling By Train During Pregnancy

Train travel is the safest form of transportation for pregnant woman.

Due to the fact that there are no sudden bumps, curves or speed incline/declines.

Trains have a gentle rocking motion which is better for both the mother and baby within.

Ensure to book a train seat with ample amount of leg space for you to move round and stretch in.

When To Stop Travelling While Pregnant

Ideally it’s best to stop travelling by any means of transport after 37 weeks.

The body is unpredictable.

Your baby can arrive anytime after that date.

My midwife predicted I would go overdue or be exact 40 weeks when i deliver.

Reason was because it was my first pregnancy, first pregnancy’s are not expected to arrive early apparently.

Was she right?

I delivered naturally 2 weeks before my due date.

No one can predict what the body will do.

How To Plan Your Travel When Pregnant

Travelling in 8 months pregnancy – plan ahead.

I can not empathies this enough.

Wherever you go, even if it’s short distance, you need to prepare and plan especially, when in your third trimester.

I travelled 2 x 4 hour journeys via train when i was 8 months pregnant.

I planned my journey a few days before.

Revised the maps from destination A to B to C to D thoroughly.

You can use Trainline and Traveline to book your journeys, just like I did.

First use Traveline to determine what methods you can use for your journey.

Then use Trainline to book your train tickets at the cheapest rates. I decided to go off-peak as that saves 30%-70% than peak tickets. 

Travelling in 8 Months Pregnancy – Don’t Travel Alone

Take a friend you say.

If you are travelling at a later stage in your pregnancy and your health requires attention, it’s best to have someone accompany you.

I made the choice to travel on my own.

I was 8 months pregnant and healthy.

It sounded scary doing all the planning but luckily my pregnancy was super smooth so far so I didn’t see any chances of me going into labour anytime soon.

If you have generally felt well in your pregnancy then long distance travels even at the last stages will not be a problem.

If you feel well and up for the challenge, don’t be afraid.

After all, all the walking and energy used along your journey will only prepare you for an easier labour.

Travelling In 8 Months Pregnancy – What To Pack

Pack Light – You don’t need fancy candles or 7 pairs of shoes for your journey.

Wondering what to pack in your hospital bag? Read here for the ULTIMATE list.

I was travelling in the winter so I had to make sure I had comfy boots and comfy clothes to last me the journey.

The last thing you want is to be too cold or too hot because of the clothing you wear.

Break into any shoes you decide to wear for your journey beforehand. This is to avoid blisters and bruises.

Wear comfy clothing – I opted for thick leggings and a long cashmere jumper knee length. A neck scarf and a wooly coat, which I could take off in the train if it got too hot.

Please do not be travelling in heels.

Especially when your travelling in 8 months pregnancy.

You wont just tire your body out but even the baby will get tired and distressed.

Pair your dressing with a small lightweight handbag.

Depending on where you are going, if it is a work trip, you wont really need much apart from a few things that can easily fit in your handbag.

Essentials You Need To Pack When Travelling in Pregnancy

Money (a debit/credit card and some spare cash).

Plan how much expenses you will need for the whole journey and take a few extra bucks incase of emergency.

I kept cash for the bus and taxi journeys and a debit card for the train and tram.

I also took my husbands card incase mine was declined.

Always carry an extra, if travelling far from home. 

Travel Tickets

Print these out beforehand if you can and place them in travel order in a small zip pocket inside your handbag.

Very important since you never know when your little baby inside can get peckish.

I carried a small apple and banana and a few biscuits inside my bag.

Oh and a water bottle.

Don’t pack too much of food and snacks as food is readily available at many train stations and if you catch the virgin trains and were to be travelling London like myself, they have a trolley service on the train where you can grab a sandwich too. 

Powerbank and Charger

This is so important and I would definitely encourage you to purchase a powerbank if you don’t have one already.

On the train you are never guaranteed a seat next to a charging doc so a Powerbank can be a lifesaver.

Although I printed the map journey out, sometimes having the phone app open also helped.

Plus you would need your phone to be charged if calling for taxis.

They usually cost less than 10 pounds so it’s not breaking the bank.

To be honest the wired charger I didn’t even get a chance to use. The Powerbank lasted 3 charges and before it ran out I was back home.

I packed a pair of earphones, a small foldable umbrella, a woolly hat and some makeup in case I needed to top my lippie up at the office.

You can also pack an extra undergarment padding just incase you are a little leaky down there.

Being in the final trimester puts a lot of pressure on your pelvic muscles and bladder which can cause some leaks often.

If you struggle sitting in a certain spot for more than a few hours I would recommend a small cushion to take along. This can help relax the back and take some pressure off. 

What To Pack For Unborn Baby?

As the baby is inside your womb you don’t need to pack anything for it.

It’s mostly yourself you need to ensure you have everything for.

Remember, the baby is in the safest place it can ever be and that’s inside you!

So as long as you keep yourself easy and comfy, the baby will be just fine. 

Keep yourself relaxed AT ALL TIMES.

If you miss a train, DONT PANIC – the next one will come and you can board that.

When looking around for trams always ASK.

There are many staff Co-Ordinator’s who work in several train and tram stations to help guide passengers, don’t feel ashamed.

I got lost when I landed in Euston London and wasn’t sure where the underground was to St Pancreas at St Albans, so I asked a staff member who guided me. They are there to help so make use of them. 

Feeling tired?

If you feel tired then please rest.

A couple of minutes can take a lot of weight of your little feet.

Watch for bumps and holes in the ground as you want to make sure you put your feet in the right places to avoid falling or tripping (God Forbid!)

Other than that just enjoy yourself!

Take the walk and exercise in as a breeze and enjoy the surroundings and atmosphere you see.

After all it’s not everyday you get to travel at this stage in your pregnancy.

Best of luck Mums to be:)

Bored? Read on how you can avoid the travel journeys and start working from home

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can you travel 8 months pregnant by car

16 thoughts on “ Travelling at 8 Months Pregnant – What To Expect ”

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Yes travelling in the 3rd trimester takes a lot more planning! These are some great tips you’ve given here.

Thank you Abby xx

This was very well articulated and you covered almost everything related to it in detail. Women should see their overall health condition and then enjoy traveling

Thank you Sana:) Yes overall health is important before any travel xx

These are great tips! I’m not doing much traveling these days, but I will be 8 months in a couple months, so you never know.

Congratulations Jennifer, Wishing you a safe remaining pregnancy xx

You have discussed this topic in much detail I am sure it’s gonna help women during their pregnancy travellings

Thank You Sana xx

These are great tips for traveling at the end of pregnancy! It’s been a long time since I’ve been there! 🙂

So much good and detailed information. I remember traveling in my third trimester and it was tough. I definitely needed these tips and recommendations. Thanks for sharing.

Aww Thank you Felicia xx

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Travelling with a baby on a plane - What To Pack

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Travelling by car during pregnancy

Dr Ashwini Nabar

Is it safe to drive or travel by car in pregnancy?

When is driving not safe in pregnancy, how late in pregnancy is it safe to travel by car, what's the best way to sit in and get out of a car in pregnancy, how should i wear my seat belt in pregnancy, can pregnancy make me prone to motion sickness, is it safe to go on bumpy roads in pregnancy, how long at a time can i sit in a car when pregnant, how should i prepare for a long car journey in pregnancy, is it safe to use a car with an airbag during pregnancy, what should i do if i have a car accident.

  • You have severe nausea that makes driving difficult or that gets worse in the car.
  • You have severe tiredness that makes it hard to concentrate on the road.
  • You're feeling dizzy or faint.
  • You have a pregnancy complication that your doctor feels makes it unsafe for you to drive.
  • You have any physical pain or discomfort that prevents you from having good control of the car.
  • Your baby bump is very close to the steering wheel and makes twisting to reverse difficult.
  • You are in labour .
  • Sit in the front.
  • Keep the window open for fresh air. This works better than relying on the air conditioner for air.
  • Look ahead at where the car is going, rather than left or right at the scenery.
  • Speak to your doctor before leaving and discuss your journey with her. She will be able to confirm that it's fine for you and give you any advice on personalised health precautions to take.
  • Wear comfortable clothes and shoes .
  • Make sure you have plenty of healthy snacks and drinks with you to nibble on the journey.
  • If you eat out , choose foods that are thoroughly cooked, especially if you're eating non-vegetarian dishes. In general, it's safer to not have anything raw, including raw onion, salad or fruit juices. You're more vulnerable to infections when you're pregnant, including stomach infections .
  • Plan to take frequent breaks, every 90 minutes to two hours, to stretch your legs. If need be, you can break your journey with an overnight stop somewhere along the way.
  • Keep your pregnancy medical file with you so that if you need to see a doctor during your trip, they can see your medical history and know your current health.
  • It's a good idea to take a charging bank with you in case you don't get an electricity point to charge your phone when you need one.
  • Make sure that you have a spare tyre, spare engine coolant and that your car is serviced regularly.
  • Keep a note with emergency contact information and health insurance in the car.
  • Don't forget to pack your prenatal supplements or any other medication you're on.
  • Coping with the heat in pregnancy
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  • How can I spot and avoid dehydration in pregnancy?

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Travel Safety During Pregnancy

pregnancy safety, pregnancy, Baby, safety, travel, labor, plane,

During pregnancy, it's generally safe for pregnant women to travel safely, but some precautions must be taken depending on where you are traveling and your state of pregnancy and health.

Pregnancy changes affecting travel

Pregnant women experience physiologic changes that require special consideration during travel. These include weight gain, having to use the bathroom frequently, and trouble carrying heavy things. In addition, pregnant women should be aware of potential infections that can be contracted in some countries. These areas should be avoided.

General precautions when traveling

  • Be careful about what you are eating and drinking
  • Use 4-wheel luggage that's easy to move around
  • Prevent bug bites
  • Stay safe outdoors
  • Keep away from animals
  • Reduce your exposure to germs
  • Avoid sharing body fluids
  • Know how to get medical care while traveling
  • Select safe transportation
  • Maintain personal security

Travel precautions with high-risk pregnancies 

Most doctors feel it's safe to travel during the first 8 months of pregnancy u nless you have a high-risk pregnancy . The main concerns with travel during pregnancy are:

  • Risk of preterm delivery
  • Access to medical care
  • Food concerns
  • Communicable diseases
  • Getting enough exercise and fluids
  • Maintaining a healthy diet

If you have any medical or obstetric complications, such as the risk for preterm birth, poorly controlled diabetes, placental problems, or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure , your provider may recommend to not travel during your pregnancy.

Generally, in low-risk pregnancies the safest time to travel during pregnancy is in the second trimester (13 to 28 weeks) .

If you plan to travel, discuss the trip with your health care provider. Talk about the distance and length of the trip, the mode of travel, and any suggestions for things you should or should not do before, during, and after the trip.

Generally, the safest time to travel during pregnancy is the second trimester (13 to 28 weeks). At this time you probably feel your best and you are in the least danger of having a miscarriage or premature labor. While traveling in and by itself is unlikely to increase your risks, there is always a possibility of complications, especially premature labor and delivery. So you need to ask yourself whether you feel safe having a baby wherever you are traveling to.

Avoid traveling any long distance during the last 2 or 3 weeks before your due date. If labor starts early, you will want to be close to home.

What are the general guidelines for travel during pregnancy?

  • See your health care provider just before you leave on your trip. Ask your provider if you will need any prenatal care visits while you are traveling, and if so, where you might go for prenatal care.
  • Take a copy of your prenatal record with you.
  • Ask your health care provider for the name of a doctor in the city or area you will be visiting.
  • Wear comfortable, low-heeled shoes and loose-fitting clothes.
  • Eat healthy meals and snacks. Meals may be unpredictable while traveling. Carry snacks with you. Eat enough fiber in your meals to avoid constipation.
  • Drink plenty of water. Carry a water bottle with you.
  • Do not take any medicines, including nonprescription medicines, without your health care provider's permission.
  • Get up and walk often while you are traveling. Stop walking when you are tired.
  • Get enough sleep and rest to avoid tiredness. Sleep on a firm mattress.
  • If you have to sit for a long time, alternate pointing and raising your feet often. Walking and moving your arms improves blood flow in your body. This prevents blood clots from forming in the legs and pelvis.
  • Keep your travel plans as flexible as possible. Problems may develop at the last minute and you might have to cancel your trip. Unless it is absolutely necessary, do not plan any trips during the third trimester of your pregnancy.

What are the guidelines for traveling by car?

Do not ride in the car for more than 6 hours each day. Stop every 1 to 2 hours for some exercise, such as walking.

  • Always wear a seatbelt. A seat belt is safe for both the mother and baby when worn properly. If the seat belt is only a lap belt, place it below your abdomen. If you have a shoulder and lap belt, place the lap portion under your abdomen and the shoulder belt across your shoulder and between the breasts. Be sure that the seat belt fits snugly. Airbags are safe but you must also wear the seat belt. The gas used in airbags won't hurt you or the baby. If you are in an accident, you should see a doctor to make sure you and your baby are fine.
  • Adjust your seat as far from the dashboard or steering wheel as possible.
  • Motorcycle travel is not recommended during pregnancy.

What if I am traveling by bus or train?

  • You may have less opportunity to walk every couple of hours when you travel by bus. Take advantage of any stops the bus makes to get some exercise.
  • When you are traveling by train, get up and walk every hour or two.
  • Remember that there are fewer bathrooms on a bus than a train.
  • The motion of a train ride will not cause any problems with the pregnancy, and it won't start labor either.

Are there special concerns for traveling by air?

Flying is usually a safe way to travel. Most domestic airlines will allow a pregnant woman to fly up to the 36th week of pregnancy if there are no problems with the pregnancy. Each airline has policies regarding pregnancy and flying. Check with your airline when you reserve your tickets to see if you need to complete any medical forms.

Suggested guidelines for traveling by air:

  • Try to get an aisle seat at the bulkhead (the wall that separates first class from coach) to have the most space and comfort. If you are more concerned about a smoother ride, you may prefer a seat over the wing in the midplane region.
  • Wear layered clothing because the temperature in the cabin may change during the flight.
  • Drink a lot of fluids because the air in the plane can be very dry.
  • If you want a special meal on the plane, you can usually order it in advance on most flights.
  • Eat small meals to help avoid air sickness.
  • During smooth flights, walk every half hour and flex and stretch your ankles often to avoid swelling.
  • Wear a seat belt below your abdomen whenever you are in your seat.
  • Get extra rest after long flights to help avoid jet lag.

Are there any problems with traveling by sea or ship?

Seasickness is a concern for many people traveling by sea. Your healthcare provider may recommend a medicine that helps prevent motion sickness and is safe during pregnancy. You might also consider trying acupressure wristbands.

Be aware that the medical services on a ship are very limited.

What are the guidelines for traveling internationally?

You should not travel out of the country without discussing it first with your healthcare provider. Your provider may decide foreign travel is not safe for you. If it is safe, your provider will let you know what should be done before you leave and when you arrive at your destination. You may want to register with an American Embassy or Consulate after you arrive. It is important to make sure you have had all the shots you need for the countries you are planning to visit. Some immunizations cannot be given to pregnant women.

Make sure your health insurance is valid abroad and during pregnancy. Also, check that the policy covers a newborn if you were to give birth during your travels.

Be especially cautious about what you eat in countries where traveler's diarrhea might be a problem. Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which reduces the blood flow to the placenta and your baby.

  • Do not drink untreated water, including ice cubes in drinks.
  • Avoid food and beverages from street vendors.
  • Only eat foods that are cooked and still hot, or fruits and vegetables that you peel yourself.
  • Do not eat raw or partially cooked fish or shellfish, including dishes like ceviche. Fully cooked fish and shellfish are safe.
  • Brushing your teeth with untreated water is usually safe. Most toothpaste contains antibacterial substances. Do not swallow the water.
  • Carbonated soft drinks and water, bottled water, wine, and beer are usually safe without ice. Do not add ice that has been made from tap water.
  • Avoid uncooked dairy products. Make sure the milk you drink is pasteurized.
  • Ask your health care provider what medicines are safe to take to help prevent traveler's diarrhea when you are pregnant.

Read More: Is It Safe To Swim During Your Pregnancy? Smoking and Breastfeeding Are Saunas Safe During Pregnancy?

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Travelling by car during pregnancy

Clare Herbert

Is it safe to drive during pregnancy?

How can i stay comfortable when travelling by car, how should i wear a seat belt safely during pregnancy, is it safe to travel in a car with airbags during pregnancy, i have to drive for work. what are my rights, what should i do if i'm involved in a car accident, what should i do if the car breaks down when i'm pregnant.

  • Position the diagonal strap across your collarbone and between your breasts. Ease the strap down the side of your bump. If the belt cuts across your neck, try repositioning your seat so it fits better, or get a seat belt pad.
  • Position the lap belt under your bump, so that it fits across your thighs and hips. Never place the lap part across your belly, as it could put pressure on your baby. If the strap is covering your belly button, it's too high.
  • Get off the motorway if you can. Otherwise, get to an emergency bay or pull onto the hard shoulder. If there's no hard shoulder, pull onto the verge on your left. Switch on your headlights and hazard lights.
  • If your bump permits, get out of the left side of your car. Step behind the barrier if you can.
  • If possible, use the roadside emergency phone, rather than your mobile. There should be posts with arrows pointing in the direction of the nearest phone along the back of the hard shoulder. There's a phone every mile or so. Follow the arrows, staying on your side of the carriageway. Each emergency phone has its own reference number and is answered by an operator. Tell the operator that you are a vulnerable motorist, because you're pregnant.
  • Return to your car and wait for help. Wait on the raised area behind the barrier, well away from the traffic.
  • If you can't get to an emergency phone, call your breakdown provider, or Highways England on 0300 123 5000.
  • In the unlikely event that you break down in moving traffic and can't leave your car, keep your seatbelt on, switch on your hazard lights, and call 999.

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Travelling in pregnancy

With the proper precautions such as travel insurance, most women can travel safely well into their pregnancy.

Wherever you go, find out what healthcare facilities are at your destination in case you need urgent medical attention. It's a good idea to take your maternity medical records (sometimes called handheld notes) with you so you can give doctors the relevant information if necessary.

Find out more about getting healthcare abroad .

Make sure your travel insurance covers you for any eventuality, such as pregnancy-related medical care during labour, premature birth and the cost of changing the date of your return trip if you go into labour .

When to travel in pregnancy

Some women prefer not to travel in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy because of  nausea and vomiting and feeling very tired during these early stages. The risk of  miscarriage is also higher in the first 3 months, whether you're travelling or not.

Travelling in the final months of pregnancy can be tiring and uncomfortable. So, many women find the best time to travel or take a holiday is in mid-pregnancy, between 4 and 6 months.

Flying in pregnancy

Flying isn't harmful to you or your baby, but discuss any health issues or pregnancy complications with your midwife or doctor before you fly.

The chance of going into labour is naturally higher after  37 weeks (around 32 weeks if you're carrying twins), and some airlines won't let you fly towards the end of your pregnancy. Check with the airline for their policy on this.

After week 28 of pregnancy, the airline may ask for a letter from your doctor or midwife confirming your due date, and that you are not at risk of complications. You may have to pay for the letter and wait several weeks before you get it.

Long-distance travel (longer than 4 hours) carries a small risk of blood clots (deep vein thrombosis (DVT)) . If you fly, drink plenty of water and move about regularly – every 30 minutes or so. You can buy a pair of graduated compression or support stockings from the pharmacy, which will help reduce leg swelling.

Travel vaccinations when you're pregnant

Most vaccines that use live bacteria or viruses aren't recommended during pregnancy because of concerns that they could harm the baby in the womb.

However, some live travel vaccines may be considered during pregnancy if the risk of infection outweighs the risk of live vaccination. Ask your GP or midwife for advice about specific travel vaccinations. Non-live (inactivated) vaccines are safe to use in pregnancy.

Malaria tablets

Some anti-malaria tablets aren't safe to take in pregnancy so ask your GP for advice.

Zika virus is mainly spread by mosquitoes found in some parts of the world. For most people it's mild and not harmful, but can cause problems if you're pregnant.

If you are pregnant, it is not recommended to travel to parts of the world where the Zika virus is present, such as parts of:

  • South and Central America
  • the Caribbean
  • the Pacific islands

Check before you travel

It's important to check the risk for the country you're going to before you travel.

Find out more about the Zika virus risk in specific countries on the Travel Health Pro website

Car travel in pregnancy

It's best to avoid long car journeys if you're pregnant. However, if it can't be avoided, make sure you stop regularly and get out of the car to stretch and move around.

You can also do some exercises in the car (when you're not driving), such as flexing and rotating your feet and wiggling your toes. This will keep the blood flowing through your legs and reduce any stiffness and discomfort. Wearing compression stockings while on long car journeys (more than 4 hours) can also increase the blood flow in your legs and help prevent blood clots.

Tiredness and dizziness are common during pregnancy so it's important on car journeys to drink regularly and eat natural, energy-giving foods, such as fruit and nuts.

Keep the air circulating in the car and wear your seatbelt with the cross strap between your breasts and the lap strap across your pelvis under your bump, not across your bump.

Road accidents are among the most common causes of injury in pregnant women. If you have to make a long trip, don't travel on your own. You could also share the driving with your companion.

Sailing in pregnancy

Ferry companies have their own restrictions and may refuse to carry heavily pregnant women (often beyond 32 weeks on standard crossings and 28 weeks on high-speed crossings ). Check the ferry company's policy before you book.

For longer boat trips, such as cruises, find out if there are onboard facilities to deal with pregnancy and medical services at the docking ports.

Food and drink abroad in pregnancy

Take care to avoid food- and water-borne conditions, such as stomach upsets and travellers' diarrhoea . Some medicines for treating stomach upsets and travellers' diarrhoea aren't suitable during pregnancy.

Always check if tap water is safe to drink. If in doubt, drink bottled water. If you get ill, keep hydrated and continue eating for the health of your baby, even if you're not hungry.

Find out about a healthy diet in pregnancy , and foods to avoid in pregnancy .

Page last reviewed: 17 August 2022 Next review due: 17 August 2025

Is it safe to travel while pregnant? Is it safe to fly?

Pregnancy is undoubtedly a very special stage that generally does not prevent a woman from traveling if the pregnancy is developing normally and without complications.

However, in the case of pregnant women, they should take into account a series of recommendations and guidelines to be followed so that the trip does not pose any risk to them or to the baby.

In any case, since each pregnancy is different, it is important to consult with the specialist before embarking on the trip. In this way, the obstetrician will be able to assure the woman that there are no problems and may even be able to give her some indication.

Provided below is an index with the 8 points we are going to expand on in this article.

  • 1. Is it possible to travel during pregnancy?
  • 2. When is travel during pregnancy contraindicated?
  • 3. What is the best transportation for pregnant women?
  • 3.1. Aircraft
  • 3.4. Other transportation
  • 4. Recommendations for travel during pregnancy
  • 5. FAQs from users
  • 5.1. Can you travel at 8 months pregnant?
  • 5.2. Is it possible to travel or fly by plane in week 8 of pregnancy?
  • 5.3. Is travel recommended during the 2WW?
  • 5.4. Is it possible to travel if there is a threat of miscarriage?
  • 6. Suggested for you
  • 7. References
  • 8. Authors and contributors

Is it possible to travel during pregnancy?

In general, if the pregnancy is developing normally (when there are no complications and it is not a risky pregnancy), the woman can travel pregnant. However, in order for the pregnant woman to travel more safely, it is advisable to plan the trip for the second trimester of pregnancy, between the 18th and 28th weeks.

In the first trimester, the risk of miscarriage is higher and, in addition, the pregnant woman may have typical first trimester discomfort such as nausea, dizziness... which will make traveling uncomfortable. On the other hand, in the third trimester of pregnancy, the main reason why travel is less advisable is the risk of premature delivery.

However, in the second trimester, the pregnant woman will have the energy to enjoy the trip and, surely, the increased volume of the belly will not yet hinder her mobility too much.

Imagen: Is it possible to travel pregnant?

In any case, in addition to the gestation period, it is important to correctly choose the best means of transport to make that pregnant trip and, of course, pay close attention to whether the chosen destination is the most suitable to go during pregnancy. In addition, the specialist should always be consulted if there are any contraindications.

When is travel during pregnancy contraindicated?

As mentioned above, in a normal pregnancy a woman can travel during pregnancy. However, in circumstances such as the following, the specialist may recommend that the pregnant woman not travel:

  • Date close to the FPP.
  • Existence of complications or risky pregnancy .
  • Unfavorable history of previous pregnancy.
  • Multiple pregnancy .
  • Arterial hypertension .
  • Gestational diabetes .
  • Severe anemia .
  • Cardiac disease in the mother.

Imagen: Contraindications to travel while pregnant

However, there may be other circumstances particular to the pregnant woman that may also make travel during pregnancy inadvisable, so always consult with the specialist if there is any inconvenience before starting to organize the trip.

What is the best transportation for pregnant women?

Not all means of transportation are equally comfortable and this difference can be even greater if you are traveling pregnant. Therefore, it is advisable to take some aspects into account if you are going to travel during pregnancy.

In addition, it is important to know the possible requirements for pregnant travelers of the company with which the trip is made.

Air travel is safe during pregnancy and is a good option for travel to destinations that are a considerable distance away. In general, there would be no impediment to air travel up to 36 weeks of gestation (32 weeks for multiple pregnancies) if the pregnancy is developing normally without complications.

In any case, the specialist should always be consulted about air travel, in case there are any contraindications.

Likewise, you should consult the possible requirements that the airline may have for pregnant women in terms of the week of gestation in which they are, if a medical certificate is necessary to fly or the existence of specific requirements for pregnant women with flights to international destinations.

Imagen: Air travel during pregnancy

As a recommendation, you should carry in your carry-on baggage your pregnancy documentation, a change of clothes and anything else you consider important, in case you lose your checked baggage.

The high-speed train is one of the most comfortable ways to travel during pregnancy. The seats are comfortable , the pregnant woman can walk freely in the aisles during the trip to reduce the risk of blood clots, and she can easily go to the bathroom.

However, care should be taken with trains that cover shorter distances and have a lot of rattling, as they may be particularly uncomfortable for pregnant women.

Traveling in a pregnant car is a comfortable option for short trips and, especially, if the woman is the co-driver and someone else is driving. There is a certain time during pregnancy when a woman will not be able to drive because of the size of her belly, which will lead her to move the seat away from the steering wheel to maintain a safe distance and, perhaps, she will no longer be able to reach the pedals. In addition, during the last months of pregnancy, it is recommended not to drive.

However, if the pregnant woman is the copilot, she can perform ankle movements (flexion and extension) between stops, which will reduce the risk of blood clots. Even so, it is recommended to stop every two hours at the most to be able to walk for a few minutes and go to the bathroom.

Imagen: Traveling by car during pregnancy

Finally, it is advisable to avoid roads that are in poor condition or dangerous, as well as, of course, violent driving.

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Other transportation

During pregnancy, traveling by boat may be less advisable than by other means of transportation (such as train) because the pregnant woman may experience motion sickness and nausea with the swaying of the waves.

In case of sailing, it is important to make sure that there is medical service on board and possible special requirements for pregnant women such as a medical certificate.

The bus is also not highly recommended for travel during pregnancy. Seat space is limited, buses often do not have toilets and pregnant women cannot get up to walk down the aisle (they will have to do exercises to move their legs and flex and extend their ankles in the seat itself). In addition, the stops are fixed and limited.

Recommendations for travel during pregnancy

The following is a list of recommendations that pregnant women should take into account in order to travel comfortably and safely:

  • Consult with the obstetrician about the convenience of making the trip.
  • Try to travel accompanied .
  • Maintain all safety measures during the trip. For example, the correct use of seat belts in transportation such as cars and airplanes is important.
  • Hydrate frequently and carry a healthy snack.
  • Avoid foods that may cause gas and carbonated beverages, especially if traveling by plane.
  • Always wear sunscreen , even when it is not summer.
  • Walking frequently (every hour) for several minutes, either in the aisle of the plane, train or making stops if traveling by car. This will help reduce the risk of blood clots in the lower extremities. Flexing and extending the ankles between walks or if there is no possibility of walking, for example, on a bus.
  • Choose seats that are next to the aisle and near the restroom, whenever possible, when traveling by plane or train.
  • Wear comfortable and loose-fitting clothing , avoiding tight-fitting garments. Footwear should also be comfortable.

Imagen: Recommendations for safe travel during pregnancy

  • Do not carry weight .
  • Do not take medication , for example for dizziness, if you have not previously consulted with the specialist that it is safe to do so in pregnancy.
  • Check that the trip does not coincide with a prenatal control visit . In such a case, the trip or consultation must be rescheduled or, especially if the trip is a long one, arrangements must be made to carry out the consultation at the destination.
  • Search for a hospital at the destination where they can attend to medical emergencies of pregnancy. In addition, all medical documentation should be carried at all times in case of unforeseen circumstances.
  • Assess whether medical insurance or travel insurance is necessary.
  • Find out if any vaccinations are required to travel to the destination of your choice and, if necessary, check with the specialist that it is safe to have them during pregnancy. Usually, this type of vaccinations to travel to more exotic places are not compatible with pregnancy, so it would be advisable to avoid this type of destinations during pregnancy.
  • Do not travel to areas with active outbreaks of infectious diseases .
  • Take special care with food and with the hygienic measures of water and food, due to the possible transmission of diseases.

Imagen: Tips for traveling during pregnancy

The most important thing is to rest and enjoy the trip while pregnant. It is not advisable to finish exhausted and, especially, if it is hot.

FAQs from users

Can you travel at 8 months pregnant.

Long journeys at such an advanced gestational age are not advisable, not only due to the risks associated for both the mother and the fetus, but just because of the number of discomforts for the pregnant woman.

Most airlines require pregnant women to present a medical certificate stating that she is in good condition for traveling. In any case, whether you are traveling by plane or not, you should ask your doctor previously.

Is it possible to travel or fly by plane in week 8 of pregnancy?

Yes, in principle, there is no problem in taking a trip, whether by car, train or plane, at this stage of pregnancy.

Women who decide to go sightseeing during their pregnancy should be careful to stay well hydrated and take as many breaks as necessary to avoid fatigue.

Is travel recommended during the 2WW?

There is no problem in going away for a few days to relax, whenever it is without getting too tired or making great efforts. In case of nausea, a long car trip can increase the anxiety and cause vomiting.

Is it possible to travel if there is a threat of miscarriage?

Many specialists advise pregnant women who are in a situation of threatened miscarriage not to travel, at least until this dangerous situation has passed.

Suggested for you

In this article you can read more information about driving while pregnant: Driving pregnant: posture and seat belts .

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ACOG Committee Opinion No. 443: Air travel during pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Oct;114(4):954. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181bd1325. PMID: 19888065. ( View )

Cannegieter SC, Rosendaal FR. Pregnancy and travel-related thromboembolism. Thromb Res. 2013 Jan;131 Suppl 1:S55-8. doi: 10.1016/S0049-3848(13)70023-9. PMID: 23452744. ( View )

Coffey CH, Casper LM, Reno EM, Casper SJ, Hillis E, Klein DA, Schlein SM, Keyes LE. First-Trimester Pregnancy: Considerations for Wilderness and Remote Travel. Wilderness Environ Med. 2023 Jun;34(2):201-210. doi: 10.1016/j.wem.2022.12.001. Epub 2023 Feb 25. PMID: 36842861. ( View )

Freedman DO, Chen LH. Vaccines for International Travel. Mayo Clin Proc. 2019 Nov;94(11):2314-2339. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.02.025. PMID: 31685156. ( View )

Hagmann SHF, Rao SR, LaRocque RC, Erskine S, Jentes ES, Walker AT, Barnett ED, Chen LH, Hamer DH, Ryan ET; Global TravEpiNet Consortium and the Boston Area Travel Medicine Network. Travel Characteristics and Pretravel Health Care Among Pregnant or Breastfeeding U.S. Women Preparing for International Travel. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Dec;130(6):1357-1365. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002360. PMID: 29112671; PMCID: PMC5909816. ( View )

Jones CA, Chan C. Bon voyage: an update on safe travel in pregnancy. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Dec;36(12):1101-1106. doi: 10.1016/S1701-2163(15)30389-3. PMID: 25668047. ( View )

Ram S, Shalev-Ram H, Neuhof B, Shlezinger R, Shalev-Rosental Y, Chodick G, Yogev Y. Air travel during pregnancy and the risk of venous thrombosis. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM. 2023 Jan;5(1):100751. doi: 10.1016/j.ajogmf.2022.100751. Epub 2022 Sep 15. PMID: 36115570. ( View )

Shalev Ram H, Ram S, Miller N, Rosental YS, Chodick G. Air travel during pregnancy and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes as gestational age and weight at birth: A retrospective study among 284,069 women in Israel between the years 2000 to 2016. PLoS One. 2020 Feb 6;15(2):e0228639. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0228639. PMID: 32027691; PMCID: PMC7004371. ( View )

Vouga M, Chiu YC, Pomar L, de Meyer SV, Masmejan S, Genton B, Musso D, Baud D, Stojanov M. Dengue, Zika and chikungunya during pregnancy: pre- and post-travel advice and clinical management. J Travel Med. 2019 Dec 23;26(8):taz077. doi: 10.1093/jtm/taz077. PMID: 31616923; PMCID: PMC6927317. ( View )

Ziegler CC. Travel-related illness. Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2013 Jun;25(2):333-40. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2013.02.015. Epub 2013 Apr 2. PMID: 23692948. ( View )

FAQs from users: 'Can you travel at 8 months pregnant?' , 'Is it possible to travel or fly by plane in week 8 of pregnancy?' , 'Is travel recommended during the 2WW?' and 'Is it possible to travel if there is a threat of miscarriage?' .

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Pregnant Travelers

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Pregnant travelers can generally travel safely with appropriate preparation. But they should avoid some destinations, including those with risk of Zika and malaria. Learn more about traveling during pregnancy and steps you can take to keep you and your baby healthy.

Before Travel

Before you book a cruise or air travel, check the airlines or cruise operator policies for pregnant women. Some airlines will let you fly until 36 weeks, but others may have an earlier cutoff. Cruises may not allow you to travel after 24–28 weeks of pregnancy, and you may need to have a note from your doctor stating you are fit to travel.

Zika and Malaria

Zika can cause severe birth defects. The Zika virus is spread through mosquito bites and sex. If you are pregnant, do not travel to  areas with risk of Zika . If you must travel to an area with Zika, use  insect repellent  and take other steps to avoid bug bites. If you have a sex partner who lives in or has traveled to an area with Zika, you should use condoms for the rest of your pregnancy.

Pregnant travelers should avoid travel to areas with malaria, as it can be more severe in pregnant women. Malaria increases the risk for serious pregnancy problems, including premature birth, miscarriage, and stillbirth. If you must travel to an area with malaria, talk to your doctor about taking malaria prevention medicine. Malaria is spread by mosquitoes, so use  insect repellent and take other steps to avoid bug bites.

Make an appointment with your healthcare provider or a travel health specialist  that takes place at least one month before you leave. They can help you get destination-specific vaccines, medicines, and information. Discussing your health concerns, itinerary, and planned activities with your provider allows them to give more specific advice and recommendations.

Plan for the unexpected. It is important to plan for unexpected events as much as possible. Doing so can help you get quality health care or avoid being stranded at a destination. A few steps you can take to plan for unexpected events are to  get travel insurance ,    learn where to get health care during travel ,  pack a travel health kit ,  and  enroll in the Department of State’s STEP .

Be sure your healthcare policy covers pregnancy and neonatal complications while overseas. If it doesn’t get travel health insurance that covers those items. Consider getting medical evacuation insurance too.

Recognize signs and symptoms that require immediate medical attention, including pelvic or abdominal pain, bleeding, contractions, symptoms of preeclampsia (unusual swelling, severe headaches, nausea and vomiting, and vision changes), and dehydration.

Prepare a  travel health kit . Pregnant travelers may want to include in your kit prescription medications, hemorrhoid cream, antiemetic drugs, antacids, prenatal vitamins, medication for vaginitis or yeast infection, and support hose, in addition to the items recommended for all travelers.

During Travel

Your feet may become swollen on a long flight, so wear comfortable shoes and loose clothing and try to walk around every hour or so. Sitting for a long time, like on long flight, increases your chances of getting blood clots, or deep vein thrombosis. Pregnant women are also more likely to get blood clots. To reduce your risk of a blood clot, your doctor may recommend compression stockings or leg exercises you can do in your seat. Also, see CDC’s Blood Clots During Travel page for more tips on how to avoid blood clots during travel.

Choose safe food and drink. Contaminated food or drinks can cause travelers’ diarrhea and other diseases and disrupt your travel. Travelers to low or middle income destinations are especially at risk. Generally, foods served hot are usually safe to eat as well as dry and packaged foods. Bottled, canned, and hot drinks are usually safe to drink. Learn more about how to choose safer  food and drinks  to prevent getting sick.

Pregnant women should not use bismuth subsalicylate, which is in Pepto-Bismol and Kaopectate. Travelers to low or middle income  destinations  are more likely to get sick from food or drinks. Iodine tablets for water purification should not be used since they can harm thyroid development of the fetus.

After Travel

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If you traveled and feel sick, particularly if you have a fever, talk to a healthcare provider immediately, and tell them about your travel. Avoid contact with other people while you are sick.

More Information

CDC Yellow Book: Pregnant Travelers

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Home & renters insurance, car repair estimates, read car content, jerry data & research, is traveling in a car safe in the third trimester.

I’ll be driving to see my parents next month. It’s an 8-hour ride, and I’m seven months pregnant. Is it safe to travel by car that far when I’m in my third trimester?

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  • Be sure to take a break every two to four hours . Get out of the car and walk around to increase circulation. This helps to prevent DVT. (You’ll likely need those restroom breaks anyway!)
  • Wear loose clothing. Again, loose clothing will help with circulation.
  • Wear your seat belt. When you’re in your third trimester, it can be tempting not to put it on—but you still need to.
  • If you’re riding in the passenger’s seat, move the seat back so if the airbag deploys, your baby will be less likely to sustain an injury.
  • Call 911 immediately if you are in an accident.

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Travelling while pregnant

Find useful information and considerations to help you prepare for safe and healthy travels outside Canada while pregnant.

With careful preparation, travelling while pregnant can be safe. The decision to travel should be made in consultation with your health care professional, based on your personal health circumstances.

On this page

Before you go, while you're away, if you need help.

Medical practices, health standards and infection control measures vary from country to country. You may not have access to the same level of care, procedures, treatments and medications as you would in Canada.

You could also be at increased risk of getting an infection and/or developing severe complications from certain infections, which could also affect the fetus.

Before leaving Canada:

  • consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic at least 6 weeks before travelling to get personalized health advice and recommendations
  • check our Travel Advice and Advisories for country-specific information, including about possible health risks
  • know how to seek medical assistance outside of Canada
  • review the policy and the coverage it provides
  • most policies do not automatically cover pregnancy-related conditions or hospital care for premature infants
  • ask your insurance provider about coverage for medical care during pregnancy, giving birth and intensive care for you and your fetus or newborn
  • carry a copy of your prenatal records
  • talk to your health care professional about any additional items you may want to bring that are specific to your health needs

Local laws and medical services relating to pregnancy can differ from Canada. Learn the local laws, and how these may apply to you before you travel.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

Many vaccines can be safely given during pregnancy. Due to a higher risk of more severe outcomes for you and your fetus, some vaccines are recommended specifically during pregnancy, such as tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis (DTaP) and influenza.

Don’t take medications you may still have from prior trips. Tell the health care professional about your pregnancy, or intended pregnancy, before filling any prescriptions. The decision to get any pre-travel vaccinations or medications should be discussed with your health care professional.

The decision can depend on:

  • your purpose of travel (e.g., tourism, visiting friends and relatives)
  • your planned destination(s)
  • the length of your trip
  • your risk of getting a disease
  • how severe the effect of a disease would be to you and/or your fetus
  • your planned activities
  • any underlying medical issues and/or pregnancy-related complications

Malaria could cause major health problems for a mother and her unborn baby. A pregnant woman may want to consider avoiding travel to areas where malaria transmission occurs.

Description of malaria risk by country and preventative measures.

If you can’t avoid travelling to an area where malaria is present:

  • some medications to prevent or treat malaria may not be safe during pregnancy
  • take extra care to protect yourself from mosquito bites

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can pose significant risks to your fetus even if you don’t develop symptoms. While pregnant, you may want to consider avoiding travelling to a country or areas with risk of Zika virus.

Latest travel health advice on Zika virus.

If you choose to travel, take precautions to avoid infection with Zika virus:

  • prevent mosquito bites at all times
  • protect yourself from contact with semen, vaginal fluid and blood
  • always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact while in countries or areas with risk of Zika virus

Learn more about Zika virus and pregnancy:

  • Zika virus: Pregnant or planning a pregnancy
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers
  • Pregnancy and travel (tropical medicine and travel)

Monitor your health and be prepared

Emergencies can happen at any time. Know where the nearest hospital or medical centre is while you are travelling and confirm they will accept your medical insurance.

Seek medical attention immediately if you develop any of the following symptoms while travelling:

  • persistent vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • dehydration
  • vaginal bleeding
  • passing tissue or clots
  • abdominal pain, cramps or contractions
  • your water breaks
  • excessive swelling of face, hands or legs
  • excessive leg pain
  • severe headaches
  • visual problems

If you develop these symptoms after your return to Canada, you should see a health care professional immediately and tell them about your recent trip.

Transportation

Always wear a seatbelt when travelling by plane or car. When using a diagonal shoulder strap with a lap belt, the straps should be placed carefully above and below your abdomen. If only a lap belt is available, fasten it at the pelvic area, below your abdomen.

If you have any medical or pregnancy-related complications, discuss with your health care professional whether air travel is safe for you.

Most airlines restrict travel in late pregnancy or may require a written confirmation from a physician. Check this with the airline before booking your flight.

During long flights, you may be at higher risk of developing blood clots, known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The risk of deep vein thrombosis can be reduced by:

  • getting up and walking around occasionally
  • exercising and stretching your legs while seated
  • selecting an aisle seat when possible
  • wearing comfortable shoes and loose clothing

Your health care professional may recommend additional ways to reduce your risk such as wearing compression stockings.

Always stay well hydrated while travelling.

Land travel

The risk of deep vein thrombosis can be reduced by:

  • stopping the vehicle to walk around every couple of hours

Motion sickness

Certain medications used to treat nausea and vomiting during pregnancy may also be effective in relieving motion sickness.

If you think you might experience motion sickness during your trip, speak to your health care professional about the use of these medications.

Environmental and recreational risks

Some activities may not be recommended or may require additional precautions. Discuss your travel plans, including any planned or potential recreational activities with a health care professional.

High altitude

You should avoid travelling to an altitude above 3,658 metres (12,000 feet).

However, if you have a high-risk pregnancy and/or are in the late stages of pregnancy, the highest altitude should be 2,500 metres (8,200 feet).

If you have pregnancy-related complications, you should avoid unnecessary high-altitude exposure.

Keep in mind that most high-altitude destinations are far from medical care services.

Personal protective measures

Food-borne and water-borne diseases.

Eat and drink safely while travelling while travelling. Many food-borne and water-borne illnesses can be more severe during pregnancy and pose a risk to the fetus.

This can include:

  • toxoplasmosis
  • listeriosis
  • hepatitis A and E

To help avoid food-borne and water-borne diseases:

  • before eating or preparing food
  • after using the bathroom or changing diapers
  • after contact with animals or sick people
  • before and after touching raw meat, poultry, fish and seafood
  • if you’re at a destination that lacks proper sanitation and/or access to clean drinking water, only drink water if it has been boiled or disinfected or if it’s in a commercially sealed bottle
  • use ice made only from purified or disinfected water
  • this could cause the fetus or newborn to develop thyroid problems
  • unpasteurized dairy products, such as raw milk and raw milk soft cheeses
  • unpasteurized juice and cider
  • raw or undercooked eggs, meat or fish, including shellfish
  • raw sprouts
  • non-dried deli meats, including bologna, roast beef and turkey breast
  • don’t use bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol®)
  • Information on travellers’ diarrhea

Illnesses acquired from insect and other animals

Protect yourself from insect bites:

  • wear light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • prevent mosquitoes from entering your living area with screening and/or closed, well-sealed doors and windows
  • use insecticide-treated bed nets if mosquitoes can’t be prevented from entering your living area
  • information on insect bite and pest prevention

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. You should avoid contact with animals including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats.

Information for if you become sick or injured while travelling outside Canada.

For help with emergencies outside Canada, contact the:

  • nearest Canadian office abroad
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa

More information on services available at consular offices outside Canada.

Related links

  • Immunization in pregnancy and breastfeeding: Canadian Immunization Guide
  • Advice for Canadians travelling to Zika-affected countries
  • Advice for women travellers
  • If you get sick before or after returning to Canada
  • Receiving medical care in other countries
  • Travel vaccinations
  • What you can bring on a plane
  • Tips for healthy travel
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  • View all credit cards
  • Banking guide
  • Loans guide
  • Insurance guide
  • Personal finance
  • View all personal finance
  • Small business
  • Small business guide
  • View all taxes

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Travel Insurance and Rental Cars: What’s Covered?

Carissa Rawson

Many or all of the products featured here are from our partners who compensate us. This influences which products we write about and where and how the product appears on a page. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own. Here is a list of our partners and here's how we make money .

If you’re planning on renting a car while traveling, you’ll want to make sure that you’re covered with insurance. Most rental car companies offer some coverage at an extra cost, but these options tend to be expensive. But affordable rental car insurance is out there — it just takes some effort to coordinate.

Many general travel insurance policies offer rental car coverage either as part of their standard plans or as an add-on. Plus, you may have a credit card with rental car insurance already included .

Here's a look at how car rental travel insurance works, what it covers and other options for making sure you’re insured while on the road in a rented car.

Does travel insurance cover car rentals?

Yes, many travel insurance policies include some form of rental car coverage. If it’s not already included in your plan, there may be an option to customize coverage by adding rental car insurance.

Costs vary depending on the overall plan, the coverage limit of the rental car insurance and whether the insurance is primary or secondary.

Primary rental car coverage is the first entity to pay out; "secondary" means the insurance will only cover costs not already paid for by other policies. This is also known as car rental excess insurance, meaning that rental car excess insurance kicks in only after other coverage is exhausted.

If you own a car and have an insurance policy, check if you already have rental car coverage. In the U.S., personal car insurance tends to cover rentals.

» Learn more: Rental car insurance explained

Travel insurance on a rental car

When considering a specific travel insurance policy, comb through its plan documents to see what type of car rental coverage is included.

In general, rental car insurance provided by a travel insurance policy is limited. Unlike a personal car insurance policy or rental car insurance from a credit card, the plan likely won’t cover liability or medical expenses incurred in an accident.

» Learn more: How your credit card has you covered with rental car insurance

Travel insurance policies often offer a collision damage waiver (CDW), which means that the damage your vehicle sustains in an accident will be reimbursed. CDWs may also include coverage for theft.

Some policies exclude specialty vehicles from coverage, while others won’t insure you for cars rented in certain countries.

Of course, it’s also possible to opt for the insurance offered by the rental car company, which can be a hassle-free way to ensure that you don’t end up on the hook in case of an accident.

» Learn more: How to find the best travel insurance

Finding travel insurance with rental car coverage

To find a policy with rental car insurance, head to a travel insurance provider comparison sites like TravelInsurance.com or Squaremouth.

Here's a search on Squaremouth as an example.

First, input your travel information, including when you’re departing, where you’re going, age and state of residence.

Then, the search engine will create a list of all available policies, which can be filtered to those that include rental car insurance.

can you travel 8 months pregnant by car

Note that the terms of each policy can differ, especially how much coverage you’ll receive for a rental car.

» Learn more: Declining rental car insurance abroad? Know the risks

Credit cards that offer travel insurance with rental car coverage

To get rental car insurance while traveling, you may first want to check your credit cards. Many credit cards offer complimentary rental car insurance for bookings charged to that card.

You’ll find this benefit on a variety of cards, including travel credit cards and cash back credit cards. Here are some options:

Chase Sapphire Reserve Credit Card

on Chase's website

Bilt World Elite Mastercard Credit Card

on Bilt's website

Chase Sapphire Preferred Credit Card

Primary rental car coverage with reimbursement up to $75,000.

Primary auto damage collision damage waiver. New York residents are eligible only for secondary coverage.

Primary rental car coverage up to the cash value of most rental vehicles.

Primary coverage when renting for business purposes with reimbursement up to the actual cash value of most rental vehicles.

Travel insurance and rental cars recapped

It makes sense to look for a travel insurance policy that also covers a rental car, especially if you’re driving somewhere unfamiliar.

While it’s possible to purchase the insurance plans offered by the rental car company, these tend to be overpriced and overkill for many drivers. Instead, you could consider a travel insurance plan with included rental car coverage, which means you won't have to without needing to make an additional purchase.

Also, check out any personal auto insurance policy you already have to see if it has provisions for rental cars. And before you settle on buying a travel insurance policy, double-check if a credit card you already have offers complimentary rental car insurance.

How to maximize your rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are our picks for the best travel credit cards of 2024 , including those best for:

Flexibility, point transfers and a large bonus: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

No annual fee: Bank of America® Travel Rewards credit card

Flat-rate travel rewards: Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card

Bonus travel rewards and high-end perks: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

Luxury perks: The Platinum Card® from American Express

Business travelers: Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

1x-10x Earn 5x total points on flights and 10x total points on hotels and car rentals when you purchase travel through Chase Travel℠ immediately after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually. Earn 3x points on other travel and dining & 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases.

75,000 Earn 75,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $1,125 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

1x-5x 5x on travel purchased through Chase Travel℠, 3x on dining, select streaming services and online groceries, 2x on all other travel purchases, 1x on all other purchases.

75,000 Earn 75,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's over $900 when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

Chase Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card

1x-2x Earn 2X points on Southwest® purchases. Earn 2X points on local transit and commuting, including rideshare. Earn 2X points on internet, cable, and phone services, and select streaming. Earn 1X points on all other purchases.

50,000 Earn 50,000 bonus points after spending $1,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening.

can you travel 8 months pregnant by car

IMAGES

  1. Is It Safe to Drive While 8 Months Pregnant?

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  2. Is It Safe To Travel By Car During Pregnancy

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  3. Travelling By Car During Pregnancy First Trimester

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  4. Is It Safe To Travel By Car During Pregnancy? Tips To Follow

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  5. Traveling By Car During Pregnancy

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  6. Car Travel During Pregnancy

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VIDEO

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  3. Meeting Each Other for the First time After many Days apart

  4. What Does Travel Insurance Cover During Pregnancy?

  5. Pregnant Living in a Bus: How I'm Getting Care While Traveling + Birthing In The Bus

COMMENTS

  1. 11 Rules for Road Trips and Car Travel While Pregnant

    Dr. Gaither says pregnant travelers should stop "at least every two hours" and get out of the car, stretch, and walk around. This increases blood flow to the lower body which helps prevent ...

  2. Safe Car Travel During Pregnancy: Can You Travel by Car When Pregnant?

    Safety tips for pregnancy car travel. A safe car trip is a comfortable one. Keep the following tips in mind the next time you drive: Limit car time. If you're planning a longer road trip, be sure to limit your drives to six hours per day max or spread your trip over a few days so you can drive for shorter stretches. Take frequent pit stops.

  3. How to Stay Safe on Long Road Trips While Pregnant

    Holidays, vacations, and long weekends call for road trips and exploring new places. But when you're pregnant, traveling takes a bit more planning so that everything goes smoothly. As long as you're having a healthy pregnancy (and your baby is not due too soon), car trips are likely fine.

  4. When to stop traveling when pregnant

    Download any apps you use for renting cars and accessing boarding passes before you leave so you can easily reschedule things in the event of a last-minute cancellation. If you're flying during your third trimester, be sure to call the airline to check about the cutoff week for pregnancy travel. A note from your doctor that says you're ...

  5. Travel During Pregnancy

    Travel During Pregnancy. As long as there are no identified complications or concerns with your pregnancy, it is generally safe to travel during your pregnancy. The ideal time to travel during pregnancy is the second trimester. In most cases, you are past the morning sickness of the first trimester and several weeks from the third stage of ...

  6. The Ultimate Guide To Safe Car Travel During Pregnancy

    You can generally travel by car throughout most of your pregnancy. It is generally safe to travel by car until you are around 36 weeks pregnant. After this point, many airlines and travel companies may restrict your ability to travel due to the potential risks associated with flying or being far away from medical assistance.

  7. Travel During Pregnancy

    In most cases, pregnant women can travel safely until close to their due dates. But travel may not be recommended if you have pregnancy complications. If you are planning a trip, talk with your obstetrician-gynecologist (ob-gyn). And no matter how you choose to travel, think ahead about your comfort and safety.

  8. Pregnancy Travel: Traveling Safely by Air, Car, and Cruise Ship

    Pregnancy travel by car has some of the same risks and rules as traveling by plane, says Nye. "The big problem is blood clots," she says. "If you are in a car and driving long distances, get out ...

  9. What To Know About Traveling While Pregnant

    It's generally safe to travel during pregnancy, but you should always talk to your healthcare provider beforehand and make sure you have a plan in case of any medical emergencies. "For the ...

  10. Pregnancy Travel Tips: Is It Safe to Travel While Pregnant?

    Travel tips for pregnant people. Whether you're traveling by plane, train or car, use these tips to stay comfortable and safe on your trip. Pick your seat strategically. On flights, request a seat in the bulkhead, and always opt for the aisle spot to make frequent bathroom trips easier on you and your seatmate.

  11. Travelling by car while pregnant: 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, etc

    The risk of miscarriage is still high but you can travel by car if you take the necessary precautions. Travelling by car when you are 3 months pregnant. The third month of pregnancy is the time of the first ultrasound! The little embryo officially becomes a foetus and the risk of miscarriage decreases considerably.

  12. Travelling at 8 Months Pregnant

    Can A 8 Month Pregnant Woman Fly - Flying In Pregnancy. Flying isn't harmful to you or your baby. Most airlines will not let you fly after week 37 of pregnancy, because fter 37 weeks of pregnancy baby can be born anytime. If you are having a multiple pregnancy's then it's usually from 32 onwards most airlines deny.

  13. Travelling by car during pregnancy

    Yes, driving and travelling by car are considered safe in pregnancy. In your first trimester, you might find that travelling by car worsens your morning sickness. Be prepared for an unexpected urge to vomit by keeping a vomit bag, wipes and some drinking water in the car. You might not always be able to stop in time.

  14. Is It Safe to Drive While 8 Months Pregnant?

    Yes, it's uncomfortable at 8 or 9 months, but it's vital (and illegal not do so). Make sure the seat belt sits under your stomach and across your hips. The shoulder belt shouldn't run across your stomach - it should go up and over, then across your chest and finally over your shoulder. Stop and Stretch: Pregnant women find that their ...

  15. Travel Safety During Pregnancy

    Most doctors feel it's safe to travel during the first 8 months of pregnancy u nless you have a high-risk pregnancy. The main concerns with travel during pregnancy are: Risk of preterm delivery; Access to medical care; ... Do not ride in the car for more than 6 hours each day. Stop every 1 to 2 hours for some exercise, such as walking.

  16. Travelling by car during pregnancy

    Yes. As long as you're healthy, it's fine to carry on driving right up until the end of your pregnancy. In your first trimester, tiredness and nausea can make it hard to concentrate. Be sure to take regular breaks, and, if possible, drive only when you're feeling alert and well-rested. If you have back pain or pelvic pain, driving can be ...

  17. traveling 6 hours in car 8 months pregnant?

    KS22. Jun 22, 2010 at 6:57 PM. @rubz0914, At 8 months pregnant I felt like I was peeing constantly. There were some days that I'd pee, go sit down and seriously have to get right back up to pee again. Sounds crazy but that's the reality. Also, why in the world is the mama-to-be who is the guest of honor having to drive 6 hours to her baby shower?!?

  18. Travelling in pregnancy

    Travelling in the final months of pregnancy can be tiring and uncomfortable. So, many women find the best time to travel or take a holiday is in mid-pregnancy, between 4 and 6 months. ... Car travel in pregnancy. It's best to avoid long car journeys if you're pregnant. However, if it can't be avoided, make sure you stop regularly and get out of ...

  19. Is it safe to travel while pregnant? Is it safe to fly?

    Air travel is safe during pregnancy and is a good option for travel to destinations that are a considerable distance away. In general, there would be no impediment to air travel up to 36 weeks of gestation (32 weeks for multiple pregnancies) if the pregnancy is developing normally without complications. In any case, the specialist should always ...

  20. Pregnant Travelers

    Before you book a cruise or air travel, check the airlines or cruise operator policies for pregnant women. Some airlines will let you fly until 36 weeks, but others may have an earlier cutoff. Cruises may not allow you to travel after 24-28 weeks of pregnancy, and you may need to have a note from your doctor stating you are fit to travel.

  21. Is traveling in a car safe in the third trimester?

    Yes, generally speaking, if your pregnancy hasn't had complications, car travel in your third trimester should be fine. However, even with an uneventful pregnancy, caution should be taken after week 37. Risk of early labor Going into labor a few weeks early is not all that uncommon. And as you may already know, most airlines restrict travel ...

  22. Travelling while pregnant

    You should avoid travelling to an altitude above 3,658 metres (12,000 feet). However, if you have a high-risk pregnancy and/or are in the late stages of pregnancy, the highest altitude should be 2,500 metres (8,200 feet). If you have pregnancy-related complications, you should avoid unnecessary high-altitude exposure.

  23. Travel Insurance and Rental Cars: What's Covered?

    Primary rental car coverage is the first entity to pay out; "secondary" means the insurance will only cover costs not already paid for by other policies. This is also known as car rental excess ...