World on Wheels

The Complete Guide to ADHD and Traveling: Challenges, Tips and the Best Trips

Traveling as a person with ADHD can be challenging and yet intensely rewarding.  That is why I asked my friend Bethany to discuss all aspects of ADHD and traveling to produce this guide. She says the trick is to plan ahead of time and yet remain flexible so that you’re able to fully enjoy your trip.

I’m Beth, a 30-something travel junky with ADHD. My Neurodiversity has driven me to do and see things that others have never considered. I’m a sponge for new knowledge and experiences. I enjoy the experience of relying completely on myself, even if it’s sometimes scary.

The beauty of traveling with ADHD is that the adventure stretches your mind, your perception of what’s possible, and leaves you feeling more confident than ever.

This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission at no cost to you when you make a purchase using these links. This helps me keep the site going and I appreciate your support.

Planning a Trip? Make Sure to Use the Suggested Travel Resources Below!

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What is ADHD and What are the Symptoms?

According to the Mayo Clinic, ADHD in adults may include difficulty paying attention, impulsiveness, and restlessness.  Symptoms range depending on the individual.

a light blue background has an animated woman on it who appears overwhelmed.  The title says "ADHD in Adults" in dark blue letters.  The subtitle "symptoms" appears underneath.  Symptoms listed include: lack of focus, disorganization, forgetfulness, distraction, irritability, excitability, boredom, poor time management, restlessness, making careless mistakes, and low frustration tolerance.

7 Challenges of ADHD and Traveling

ADHD can be presented differently in every individual.  The following are challenges that I personally face with ADHD. They are by no means representative of everyone’s experience with ADHD.

Making Decisions

It can be hard to get a trip off the ground when you struggle with making decisions.  I get “stuck” at the grocery store deciding between two brands of dish soap – so you can imagine how hard it is for me to plan a vacation.

a black background has two arrows pointing in opposite directions with the top one saying "that way" and the bottom arrow saying "this way".  A dark haired woman is contemplating her choices.  Decision making can be hard when dealing with ADHD and traveling

I’ve found that by getting super specific about what I really want from a trip I’m able to make decisions easier.  I try to stay off Pinterest and other social media once I’ve made a decision so that I don’t second guess myself.

Hyper focusing is both a superpower and a danger.  I’m liable to get so engrossed in a topic that an emergency could occur, and I would have no idea.  Recently, I was waiting for my flight right next to the gate and the early seats had started boarding.  I then started looking at homes for sale and found one I really loved.  I lost track of time. 

Something finally brought my attention to the time, and I suddenly realized that everyone else had already boarded my flight.  I stepped up to the desk (literally five feet away) and the flight attendant told me they had called my name several times and that I was the last to board. 

I wasn’t even wearing headphones – but my hyperfocus is so powerful that I can block out hearing my own name being called on a loudspeaker! Luckily, I was able to board in time and learned not to get distracted when waiting for an important event.

Time Blindness

Many people with ADHD struggle with Time Blindness, or the inability to accurately estimate how much time has passed.  This makes travel really difficult because I’ve missed flights, trains, and entire events before. 

By acknowledging that I struggle with Time Blindness I’m able to put supports in place, like setting timers and allotting more time than needed to perform a task.

The Little Things

Little things, like forgetting your wallet, become huge problems when traveling.  It’s gotten even more difficult the last couple of years because now there are more required documents for traveling, which means more paperwork to keep up with.   

Crowds, confrontations with strangers, loud noises… These are all part and parcel with traveling and can be overwhelming especially if you have sensory processing issues on top of ADHD.

A black woman in a red sweater has her hands on her forehead and appears overwhelmed.  Getting overwhelmed is something that can happen with ADHD and traveling.

Getting Lost

This one is a kicker.  With my very limited working memory, I often get lost even in places with which I’m very familiar.  Add that to my inability to process oral directions (turn left, turn left again, what did he just say?) and you’ve got a recipe for disaster.  I’m still working on this one and haven’t found appropriate support.

Difficulty Relaxing

The ‘Hyperactive’ part of ADHD keeps me from relaxing.  Many people enjoy a beach vacation –  I am unable to sit for more than a few seconds without something highly engaging to focus on. 

As much as I want to appreciate the ocean waves, I simply cannot relax.  One time I actually timed myself and set a goal of 3 minutes to sit by the surf.  I made it to 1 ½ minutes.

11 Tips for Traveling with ADHD

While having ADHD and traveling can be a challenge, these tips will help your trip to go more smoothly.

1. Know Your Weaknesses

By being honest with yourself about your areas of weakness you’re able to be more prepared and ultimately be more successful.  We all have weaknesses, so don’t get caught up in self-blame. Instead think of it as just another part of preparing for the adventure.

2. Bring a Notebook

Because I have virtually no working memory, I always keep a notebook with me.  That way when, for example, I hear a gate change over the loudspeaker, I can write it down and reference it as many times as I need.

3. Use Your Phone to Take Pictures of Important Information

It’s so easy to lose tangible things while traveling – tickets, bag tags, etc. Take a picture so that you have a digital copy.

4. Wear a Smartwatch

A white smart watch against a black background

Buying a smartwatch has seriously leveled up my game because I now have additional reminders for important times and events.

5. Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help

I often feel a lot of shame repeatedly asking for directions because I do not have the ability to retain the information.  I feel stupid when I get lost time and time again.  If you are sensitive to this like I am, ask different people for help.  No one will ever know that you’ve asked multiple times!

6. Give Yourself Extra Time

Time flows differently for people with ADHD.  What can seem like a few minutes can easily slip into hours, or even days.  When you have an important event coming up (a flight, a bus ride, checkout time at the hotel) pull out all your tricks to meet the deadline.  “Trick” yourself by setting alarms for 1-2 hours earlier than the actual cut-off.

7. Travel With People Who Are Understanding

Often, your emotions about your vacation are based on the people with whom you travel.  Choose to travel with people who are laid back, understanding, and play to your strengths.  You don’t want to wind up feeling guilty or ashamed when you’re supposed to be having a nice time. 

A group of four people, two men and two women are standing by a red train and laughing

8. Don’t Try to Accomplish Too Much at Once

Something I’ve learned from experience is to not stretch myself too thin.  If you’re racing around trying to check items off a list, you’re not really immersing yourself in the experience.

9. Try Not to Multitask

Multi-tasking is second nature for us ADHD-ers, but it can be really rewarding to try and focus on one task at a time.  If you’re walking and enjoying the sights, try not to take pictures at the same time.  If you’re eating a delicious dinner at a scenic café, try not to check your email at the same time.

10. Plan for Overwhelm

Travel can be exhausting and overwhelming especially if you have sensory processing issues on top of ADHD.  Pack comfort items from home (a book, a deck of cards, or a handheld video game console) that you can escape to inside the hotel room after a hard day. Similarly, don’t be afraid to say you need some space and time for yourself.

11. Be Kind to Yourself

Mistakes happen much more frequently while traveling.  Stakes can feel much higher than when you’re at home.  I prepare myself for setbacks when I travel by realizing that the occasional mess up is just part of the adventure. 

A white woman in a red tank  top holds her hands together in the shape of a heart in front of her chest

Don’t beat yourself up for little (or even BIG!) mistakes while traveling.  Just keep trying your best!

5 Best Trips for Traveling with ADHD

Taking into account the challenges of ADHD and traveling, along with the tips mentioned above, here are my recommendations for the best trips for traveling with ADHD.

Anywhere Solo

I highly recommend solo travel for people with ADHD.  I have traveled solo to Mexico, Costa Rica, and the Gulf Coast of Texas. Choose a destination that excites you.  Think back to where you wanted to travel as a child, maybe from a favorite movie or book.

There are a lot of reasons why people with ADHD choose to travel alone.  Traveling alone allows you to do your own thing, pick the days and times when you want to go about exploring new places, and avoid any hassles that normally come with traveling in a group of people.

My confidence and self-esteem have grown with each solo trip.  I enjoy volunteering with marine animals and traveling solo to volunteer allows me to temporarily escape my family responsibilities and spend time doing what I love.  I come back feeling recharged.

Whatever the reason, traveling solo is one of the best ways to push yourself to your fullest potential. Traveling helps you build confidence and believe in yourself.

Road trips are great for solo travelers, friend groups, and families. I love road trips because they offer tons of flexibility. I can get out and stretch my legs whenever needed. I can relax and sleep in the car without worrying about people around me.

A black jeep drives along a dirt road and into the mountains

Not to mention that on a road trip your timeline is much less strict than a train or airplane, allowing you to do whatever feels right at that moment.

Road tripping is one of the best ways to visit new places or return to your favorites. The flexibility of this form of travel means it can be tailored to any type of traveler.

Guided Tour Groups for People Similar Interests

If you would prefer to travel in a group, I recommend finding a travel company that serves people with similar interests to yourself.  This prevents you from spending a lot of time with people with whom you have nothing in common.  My social stamina expires quickly and so I must be careful with whom I spend time with.

I’ve had both positive and negative experiences traveling with groups.  The most positive experience I’ve had was an educational tour of Jamaica specifically for teachers. 

We were able to accrue professional development hours along with the tour package.  If you can find a tour group that serves people with a similar interest to yourself, it makes the time spent with others more enjoyable.

Nature Destinations

a rocky stream leads to tall pine trees at the base of the Teton Mountains

I have found that I am most happy traveling to destinations where spending time in nature is the focus. Nature activities are a fantastic way to relax and travel at the same time. Hiking, biking, walking, and simply observing nature’s beauty seems to work with the hyperactive piece of ADHD.

Want a Complete National Parks Checklist? Sign up for my free Newsletter to get your FREE copy today!

Tall trees in a forest with one fallen tree in front of the picture

City Destinations

Traveling to a busy city can be a wonderful experience but it can also be challenging. Take advantage of hiring a local guide to help you see the most important sites and get what you want from your visit.

Find lodging that is based in a central place where you can easily get to different attractions.  Choose cities with easy-to-navigate transportation systems.

ADHD and Travel : Helpful Gadgets and Tools

Here I have listed the gadgets and tools that have helped me travel more successfully with ADHD.

*Smartwatch

I recently purchased a smart watch because I was having an increasingly difficult time remembering important events and deadlines.  By wearing a smartwatch with a calendar app , I can program it with alarms and reminders to keep me from missing major events.

*Calendar with Notes Section

I also carry a paper calendar in addition to my smartwatch and phone because writing down information is extremely helpful to me.  I have problems with working memory and generally cannot remember numbers at all, even short two-digit series.

A calendar with ample room for note taking helps me record and ultimately remember key details, like gates at the airport or hotel door codes. 

*Document Folder

A zip-up document folder helps me keep all my paper documents in one place. This is helpful because, although your phone’s digital wallet can do the same thing, you’re less likely to lose both your phone and your document folder.

Another wonderful way to stay organized is with my FREE Trip Planner! Sign up to my newsletter to get travel tips plus your free planner.

an open book has white pages with a travel checklist for Venice on them

*Portable Charger

Your phone, in addition to being a lifeline in case of an emergency, has so much vital information on it.  It’s important to have a portable charger especially if you’re like me and often forget to charge your devices.

*Sound Canceling Headphones

I have SPD (sensory processing disorder) on top of ADHD.  I recently invested in a set of powerful noise canceling headphones and they benefit my sensory overwhelm immensely. 

A white background with a black pair of noise cancelling headphones.

I also have found that they help me cope with my anxiety around turbulence, because when I wear them, I can more easily tune out and relax during a bumpy flight.  Just be sure not to wear them when you might have to listen to important information over a loudspeaker! (Like while waiting on your flight!)

*Portable Speaker

Many people with ADHD suffer from insomnia.  With my favorite portable speaker I’m able to listen to ocean sounds and it helps me sleep even in a noisy hotel.

*Weekly Pill Case

Although some doctors recommend taking a ‘drug vacation’ while traveling – I’ve found that I still need to stay on top of my ADHD meds while traveling in order to be successful and relaxed.  A weekly pill case helps me remember to take my meds every day.

A dark blue background with an orange weekly pill case.  The Sunday tab of the pill case is open and has white pills inside.

Always consult with your personal doctor before stopping any medication.

Travel Tip: Some countries require controlled substances to be in their original containers. In addition, some countries have strict laws about the types of medication you are allowed to enter with. Check the rules and regulations before your trip for your destination.

For more information on international travel and what to know before you go, check out this post !

Conclusions on ADHD and Traveling

Going through life with ADHD is a challenge and never more so than when traveling.  Fortunately, with the right supports, there are no limitations to what you can do. 

I’m a 30-something with ADHD and I frequently travel solo.  Sure, it can be complicated. Traveling with ADHD can be exhausting and sometimes even scary.  But it’s always worth it!

About the Author

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Beth McCarter (she/they) is a former teacher turned travel blogger and copywriter.  She is Neurodiverse (ADHD + Sensory Processing Disorder) and despite struggling with anxiety and occasional depression, she remains passionate about traveling.  She writes about road tripping with her family on her blog, The Travel Fam. 

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I'm Kristin and I was born with a rare form of Muscular Dystrophy, which impacts my mobility and breathing. Despite this challenge, I have travelled across the United States and abroad and want to share my accessible travel information with others.

Untapped Brilliance

The ADHD Traveler’s Checklist

by Jacqueline Sinfield | ADHD Treatment , Adult ADHD , Untapped Brilliance Blog | 12 comments

Related Posts

“Best ADHD Blog” 5 years in a row 🌟– Thank you, my friends!

“Do you have any helpful info to help the ADD person plan and PACK for a trip? It’s hellish for me.”

Actually, I do!!

Many ADHDers have a love/hate relationship with travel and the holidays. Some love the adventure and novelty; others hate the disruption to their daily routine.

Even ADHDers who love going on trips can find the planning and preparation involved challenging. In order to have an enjoyable, stress free trip with minimal unexpected surprises, some planning and attention to details are helpful.  Since both of those can be tricky when you are living with ADHD, I created a list to help you!

Use it to help you feel organized and ahead of the game. You can add or delete items to personalize the list for your needs.

 When Your Trip Is Booked

1. check your passport.

Double check that your passport is valid and that it will be valid for at least another 6 months from the date you travel. Each country has slightly different rules, some ask for longer, so if in doubt do a quick Google search for your travel destination’s criteria.

2. Book Travel Insurance

Booking insurance doesn’t have an immediate reward or consequence, which is why it is a task that is easy to put off or never do when you have ADHD.   When you are planning a trip, a goal is to have a safety net in place. Then, if unexpected events happen, it won’t  become a crisis.

3. Book Health Insurance

Ditto for the Insurance

4. Pet Sitter

Make arrangements for your pets to be looked after while you are gone. Check with your sitter /neighbour/ kennels to make sure that they will be available when you are gone.

1 Month Before You Leave:

5. home deliveries.

Cancel anything that is delivered to your home ( e.g. milk, newspaper) for the dates you will be gone.

6. Services

Cancel services you won’t need while you are away, such as a cleaning service.

Cancelling services 1 whole month before you leave might feel ‘too soon’. Pacing yourself like this means you don’t have lots of tasks in the last week.  Plus service providers are happy as it allows them to adjust their schedules.

7. Your Bank

Telephone your bank and credit card company to let them know about your travel dates and destination. This will avoid your accounts being locked by unusual spending habits. Banks want to protect you against card theft. However, it is a hassle to have to resolve while you are away.

On the subject of money, getting local currency at the airport cash machine is usually the most economical. Also, it is one less thing to organize before you go.

8. Cell Phone

Call your cell phone company to find out what packages they offer for travel. This allows you to use your phone without the fear of getting any nasty surprises when the bill arrives.

9. Create A Master List

Start creating a master list of everything you need to take with you.  Include items like clothes, shoes, toiletries, gifts etc.

10. Go Shopping

Using your master list as guide, go shopping and pick up any items you need but don’t currently own.

11. Create a Holiday Area

Reserve  a shelf or a drawer to put all your new things. They will be easy to find when it’s time to pack.

7 Days Before You Go:

12. trip to the pharmacy.

Go to the pharmacy, and refill your prescriptions, including ADHD meds .

13. Printing

Print out all of your travel information, such as flight details, hotel reservations, train tickets, car hire information, etc. Include your reservations, confirmation numbers and contact telephone numbers. You can use your cell phone as a backup;  however, when you have ADHD, the paper documents act as visual reminders and help keep you organized.

Put the printouts into a plastic sleeve. This keeps them safe and makes finding them easy. Keep the plastic sleeve in your carry-on luggage.

14. Pet Supplies

Stock up on pet food, cat litter or anything else your pet sitter will need.

15. Laundry

Wash all the clothes you are taking with you.

2 Days Before You Go

16. start to pack.

Packing now will avoid frantic last minute packing.  As you pop things into your suitcase, cross them off your master list so you don’t forget what is in your suitcase.

Night Before:

17. empty your refrigerator.

To avoid nasty smells when you get back, throw out anything with a short shelf life…milk, leftovers, vegetables etc.

18. Empty Garbage Cans

Ditto for the smells.

Before You Leave:

19. kitchen sink.

Hand wash anything in the sink, like breakfast dishes, etc.

20. Turn Everything Off

Turn off computers, TV, radios and other electrical gadgets.

21. Lock Your Door

As you are leaving your home, be mindful as you are locking your front door. This  mindfulness will help you to remember that your door is safely locked,  which in turn will help prevent  worrying thoughts  about whether or not you locked the door throughout the trip.

When You Arrive at Your Destination:

22. find a safe place.

While you are away your house keys lose their significance, and they can get misplaced. Find a safe place for them (a zipped pocket etc) so you will know where they are when you get home.

23. Unpack Your Suitcase

Here is a super painless way to do it! Unpack your suitcase.

24. Next Time!

Write a note to yourself about anything you would do differently or that you want to remember for the next time you travel.

This will make planning and organizing your next trip even easier.

Bon voyage!!

What do you do to prepare for a trip? Leave a note in the comments below!

12 comments.

Janice Heck

Great list. Helpful for everyone! I keep a running checklist which I use every year. If I think of something else, I add it. Every few years, I neaten up my list to make it more readable and organized.

Jacqueline Sinfield

That is such a great idea Janice! Something I do, is to keep my list as a google doc, then I print it out before a trip and cross things off as I go. I like having the typed list because it looks neater than my hand writing!

Alison

This really made me smile, i do all this but what i also do is have alist of things i want to pack or shop for thats standard so all i do is add to the list and keep it on my notes on phone all year round. I also have a holiday email file so all emails are moved to the folder so i wont loose them and can also refer back to. i do the same for christmas presents and cards also.

What great ideas Alison!! so organized!

Catherine

Great list, just wanted to add it’s worth checking if your medications are legal in the country you’re visiting. Most of the time it’s worthwhile to have a letter from your doctor to confirm they are.

Excellent point Catherine! Thank you for sharing it.

Kathy

What a very thorough list! I really like the Create a Holiday Area. When adding notes afterwards, I mention what I wore between the in-laws and my family’s house so I won’t wear it again the following year (I tend to pick out the same favorites). details, details, details….

Wonderful idea Kathy!!! You could also take a photo (a mirror selfie) and check your photos on your phone to see what you wore when.

Amanda

I learned a cool trick recently. Take a picture of your stove knobs before you leave. That way when you start to second guess whether you turned them all off or not, you can just look at the picture for proof instead of worrying yourself sick over it!

Hi Amanda! that is a REALLY cool trick!! What a brilliant idea! thanks for letting us know about it!

Michelle DuQuesnay

This is an awesome list. I once had to replace a passport 48 hours before a trip. Cost me a $$$$!

Jacqueline Sinfield

YAY!! So happy you like the list Michelle!! Thanks for sharing about your passport. Travel mistakes can be so costly and upsetting. Everyone feels it is only them that make this type of mistakes, that just isn’t true!!

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Hey, I'm Jacqueline, your go-to ADHD coach on a mission to help you Untap your ADHD brilliance.

I was a nurse in my past life, have a neurodiverse brain like you, and my superpower is breaking down vague or complex things so they feel easy to take action on.

In the UTB blog, I share practical strategies and insights with a sprinkle of inspiration to help you along your path of ADHD understanding and success.

So, let's embark on this adventure together - one blog post at a time! 🌟

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Travel insurance for people with adhd, is adhd a pre-existing medical condition for travel insurance, frequently asked questions.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, also known as ADHD usually starts in childhood, but it can also continue into adulthood. Here at AllClear, we are able to offer specialist ADHD travel insurance.

It is crucial that you declare all medical conditions before going on holiday so that you are fully covered if you needed to make a claim. AllClear offers Travel Insurance for pre existing conditions , including ADHD has covered over 1300 medical conditions since 2000.

Benefits of AllClear Cover

Will declaring adhd on travel insurance increase your premium.

Premiums are calculated on a number of factors including medical conditions, trip length, destination and age. It’s important to declare ADHD if you or your child have been diagnosed with it. If you need to make a claim for something relating to your ADHD and have not declared it, your claim would be invalid.

Is there anything you can pack to make things easier for your child with ADHD?

Try bringing a tablet device, pre-installed with lots of games and videos. Ensure they have noise-cancelling headphones too. You may also want to think about bringing some kind of reward for their good behaviour.

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1. call us or click a quote button on our site, 2. complete our simple medical screening process, 3. get your quotes, our 5 star trustpilot rating, read allclear trustpilot reviews.

Written by: Russell Wallace | Travel Insurance Expert Last Updated: 23 November 2023

† Based on Trustpilot reviews of all companies in the Travel Insurance Company category that have over 70,000 reviews as of January 2024. AllClear Gold Plus achieved a Which? Best Buy.

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ADHD Travel Insurance

If you are travelling abroad and have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), you should get a Travel Insurance policy before your departure. Travelling with ADHD can be both exciting and challenging. The logistics, planning, and potential for disruption can be overwhelming. However, planning allows you to set yourself up for a successful and enjoyable…

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If you are travelling abroad and have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) , you should get a Travel Insurance policy before your departure.

Travelling with ADHD can be both exciting and challenging. The logistics, planning, and potential for disruption can be overwhelming. However, planning allows you to set yourself up for a successful and enjoyable experience.

ADHD is covered as a standard.

There are no health questions for ADHD to answer as long as:

  • You have not cancelled or curtailed a trip in the last five years due to ADHD.
  • You have not been referred to a specialist due to worsening or destabilising your ADHD in the previous 12 months.
  • You have never had any hospital admissions with this condition.
  • You are not on a waiting list for treatment for ADHD.
  • You are not awaiting the results of any tests or investigations into this condition.

Please Note:  If the above statement and restrictions do not apply to you or you have any other medical conditions, you can get a quote and policy by following this link:

GET A QUOTE

Contact us by telephone at 0800 043 0020 / 01273 092 757.

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* Excess  payables vary depending on the claim benefit.

Please read the Policy Wording for the complete list of Benefits.

Healix Insurance Services Ltd, on behalf of Hamilton Insurance DAC, arranges this Travel Insurance policy for Jade Stanley Ltd. Healix Insurance Ltd is registered in England and Wales under No. 5484190 and authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority under No. 437248. Hamilton Insurance DAC is registered in Ireland No. 484148, authorised by the Central Bank of Ireland, and subject to limited regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority and Prudential Regulation Authority in connection with their UK branch. Jade Stanley Ltd is registered in England and Wales under No. 03570857 and authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority under No. 306205.

Before You Go

  • Make a detailed itinerary that includes travel times, activities, and accommodation information. Break down large tasks into smaller, more manageable steps. This will help you stay organised and avoid feeling overwhelmed.
  • Pack light and bring only what you need. Pack a variety of activities and fidget toys to keep yourself occupied during long journeys.
  • If you travel with others, tell them about your ADHD and how it might affect your travel style. This will help them be more understanding and supportive.
  • If you take medication for ADHD, make sure you have enough for your entire trip and pack it into your carry-on luggage. Talk to your doctor about getting a letter explaining your medical condition and the need for medication., especially if you travel internationally.

Travelling with ADHD

  • Things don't always go according to plan, so be prepared to be flexible and adjust your schedule.
  • Take regular breaks during the day to help remain focused and avoid burnout.
  • If you become overwhelmed by sensory input, take some time to relax in a quiet place. Use noise-reduction headphones, an eye mask, or other sensory-blocking tools.
  • Celebrate your successes along the way, no matter how small. This will help you stay motivated and positive during your trip.
  • Guided tours can be a great way to take the stress out of travelling, as they can take care of all the planning and logistics for you.
  • Travel Insurance can provide peace of mind, especially if the unexpected happens, such as a travel delay or lost luggage.
  • Remember, travel is about new experiences and creating memories. Don't be afraid to leave your comfort zone to experience new things.

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Travelling with ADHD: Advice from Psychologists The Travel Psychologist

Travelling with ADHD: Advice from Psychologists

Travelling with ADHD: Advice from Psychologists The Travel Psychologist

Photographs can help if you struggle with directions

By Dr Laura Wade (Principal Clinical Psychologist) and Tara Clegg (Assistant Psychologist)

ADHD and Travel Challenges

ADHD can present differently in every individual. However, the common symptoms are those of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. They are by no means representative of everyone’s experience with ADHD and some may have more of these symptoms than others. Some common problems that may impact travelling can be:

Making Decisions

It can be hard to get a trip off the ground when you struggle with making decisions. People with ADHD can make them too slowly aka ‘decision paralysis’. Delaying decision making can lead to planning becoming rushed at the last minute – causing stress and further worsening ADHD symptoms.

On the other hand, impulsivity can mean making plans without a great deal of planning or thinking things through. This may mean planning a holiday that doesn’t fully meet your preferences or needs, which can be disappointing. Some people with ADHD will try to not to question a decision they have already made.

Time Blindness

Many people with ADHD struggle with Time Blindness, or the inability to accurately estimate how much time has passed. This makes travel really difficult because it means you may might miss flights, trains, or entire events. You may also find it difficult to estimate how much time tasks will take, like packing a bag in time to be ready. Setting timers or scheduling more time than needed can be useful ways to counteract this.

Hyper-focusing is where someone’s attention gets ‘too’ turned on, and they cannot be distracted and might forget what they should be doing. People with ADHD can really struggle to prioritise and plan their time well, particularly if they get stuck on something. Lots of people with ADHD report liking their hyperfocus and describe it as a superpower because, when it kicks in, they can be highly productive. However, it is also a potential danger if they need to be doing something else. Again, you might find it useful to use timers or alarms, to ping yourself out of hyperfocus if you are alone. If you have people around you, you can ask them to monitor you when you really become stuck into something, and to give you a gentle reminder when its time to go.

Forgetting /Losing Items

If you have ADHD you likely have some strategies for remembering things already, like lists, always keeping your keys in the same place or having a huge bag with everything in it. We tend to think of people with ADHD as either a huge bag or no bag at all type of people. However, when you are travelling, you have to remember more things, like your passport, that you may not normally carry around. Use a similar strategy to the one you use at home but maybe also think about keeping your very important items with the hotel or asking your travel companion to keep hold of them.

If you travel often, using the same travel bag and keeping things in the same place can be helpful. Some people like to keep a ‘holiday drawer’ or box with all of their travelling things like sunglasses, sun creams and travel toiletries.

It can be helpful to put a tracker on your phone so you can find it in an unfamiliar place. You can try making a little song or rhyme and do this whenever you leave a place (e.g. glasses, passes, wallet and phone!)

Getting Lost

People with ADHD can limited working memory and really struggle with directions given verbally. Therefore you may find maps more helpful However, lots of people with ADHD may prefer not to use a map and to go off the beaten track.

Taking a photo of locations, such as a photo of the street sign for the hotel you are staying at, will allow you to ask for directions if you forget the place’s name – especially if it is in another language.

Sensory Overwhelm

Crowds, confrontations with strangers, loud noises… These are all part and parcel of travelling and can be overwhelming, especially if you have sensory processing issues on top of ADHD. Lots of people with ADHD can find all these things really overwhelming. Therefore, having relaxation/wind down time is really important so that sensory overwhelm doesn’t lead to emotional overwhelm too. Remember to bring your headphones or ear plugs on a trip to a city centre. Taking half an hour to yourself in the corner of a coffee shop can help you to manage the overwhelm and feel more relaxed for a bit more exploring or sightseeing.

Difficulty Relaxing

Contrary to needing wind-down time can be needing a lot of newness and stimulation. Lots of people report restlessness as part of their ADHD and a need to always be busy and to get the most out of the trip. If you have ADHD, you may be very easily bored or enjoy activities where you are expected to relax and be quiet. For those around them, this may be exhausting. Maybe plan an alternative activity to do whilst other people take a break. There may be times when you will need to split up from your travelling companions to give each other space.

So now that you have thought about some of the difficulties that may come up you can start to plan your lovely trip.  First things first…

Making the holiday plans….

As we’ve talked about already people with ADHD can often say that they make decisions either very quickly or get completely stuck in research and paralysed into deciding anything.

When you start planning your trip, it may be beneficial to view the task in smaller steps, such as travel/flights, accommodation, and activities. We would recommend that you make a plan for how much time you are going to spend planning i.e. 2 hours to start and have aims for what would be decided i.e. type of holiday/location.

Then do this again another day and make another plan e.g. another two hours to come up with a basic itinerary and some ideas for how to get there. Set a timer and by the end of the two hours write these plans down. If you decided on your first choices straight away, then use the time to confirm this with yourself by looking at other options -you might change your mind. Keep the browser tabs to a limit too!

Remember that booking a holiday can be quite overwhelming for most people as there are so many choices and it can be a complex task. Breaking the steps down into manageable chunks can mean that you have more time to think things through and this is much more likely to result in a travel plan that really meets your needs and preferences.

If you have decided to take a trip based on something that you have read/heard/seen, talk about this decision with someone you trust. Leaving 24-48 hours before you book can be a great way to allow yourself to think before booking. You could even put a note in your calendar to remind yourself to book.

You’ve made the plan, now what next.

Before you leave 

Finish your final jobs.  If you haven’t paid the gas bill before leaving, you may find yourself at the beach worrying about a late fee or cutoff notice. Before you go away, make a list of things that need doing and then do them. This should include things like making sure the insurance is paid and sending your travel information to someone at home. People with ADHD often procrastinate more than most people so it is important to have a strategy for tackling these more mundane tasks. If you need someone to remind you, send them the list too.

Make a clear list of what you are taking.  People with ADHD can have problems with organising their ideas and remembering things. So it’s good to make a list of what you need to take on holiday.  Make two copies of your list.  When packing for your trip, cross off items as you put them in your suitcase. Do the same when you pack for home, so you avoid leaving things at your hotel. Save your lists to use for future vacations.

A helpful packing list can be found here:  https://www.additudemag.com/download/master-packing-list/

In terms of packing for ADHD, before you pack the bikini remember to pack   your ADHD medication and letter from your prescriber!  Some people don’t take medication for their ADHD and others on stable regimes may want a medication holiday too, and this is fine. However, if you are going to want to take your medication on holiday then you need to take the tablets and a letter confirming the dose and the prescribe information especially if you are on a stimulant variety (e.g. Concerta, Elvanse etc). Many of these drugs are ‘controlled substances’ and therefore moving them from country-to-country need is not the same as taking over-the counter medications. Please see:  https://www.gov.uk/travelling-controlled-drugs . Also put your meds and the accompanying letter in your carry-on – not your checked luggage.

It also may be worth investing in some extra insurance for lost items.

When you are on the trip….

Give yourself extra time.  For those with ADHD, time can be difficult to manage. But schedules play an important role in a vacation. Hotels charge for late check-outs. And airlines and cruises often require early check-ins — arrive late, and you could miss your whole trip. It may be worth informing hotels/ B&Bs, and activity providers that you have ADHD. Discrimination law will still apply to many of these situations, so you should not feel that you cannot tell people if you need to.

Stay on schedule.  Use watches with alarms and digital apps. If you’re travelling with your family, designate a timekeeper for your group. Set goals and plan where you want to be by when. Avoid arriving at the last minute to allow for unforeseen events, like traffic, and spur-of-the-moment meal stops. Use Google Maps to estimate travel time (and then maybe add some extra time for diversions).

Budgeting  Decide how much spending money you are going to allocate and divide this by the number of days so that you have a set daily limit. Make sure to stick to this. Put the money in a separate account if you need to so that you can see how much you have left.

Plan a backup system.  Make copies of your travel documents. Keep a copy with you on vacation (separate from the originals) and leave a copy with a friend at home. If you lose your originals, you can still prove who you are and where you’re from. Take extra medication with you, and keep it separate from your main supply, in case it gets lost or you are delayed. If you have any important documents, think about putting as many as you can on your phone or Apple wallet.

Keep a phone charger in your bag.  Keep a charger in your ‘go-to’ bag – if you need it, you only have to find a plug socket! If you forget your charger, you don’t need to worry because you already have one in your bag. Also consider bring a portable charger, if you use your phone a lot to organise yourself.

Consider wearing a Sunflower lanyard.  Launched in 2016 in the UK by Hidden Disabilities, and now recognised globally, the  Sunflower Lanyard  is worn by people with invisible disabilities and aims to ‘make the invisible visible’, encouraging compassion from others. The lanyard signifies that the person wearing it may need additional support, and there is no obligation to share why it’s being worn. There may be similar systems in the country/countries you are travelling in if they don’t use the Sunflower.

Keep some form of journal/holiday diary. People with ADHD can sometimes have problems with their own chronological memory i.e. not being able to remember what has gone on in their own life. If you’ve spent a lot of money on a holiday you will want to be able to remember it. There are different ways that you could record your experiences so that you can revisit them later, so choose the one that is right for you. Some people wil take a paper journal and write down their experiences, some will choose to use a diary app or you may choose to take photographs of your experiences so that you can look back at these.

Read personal blogs  It can be helpful to read about the experiences of people who have ADHD themselves. Some tips will work for you and some won’t. Travelling with ADHD is not impossible, even if you have had poor experiences in the past. It can be a wonderful way to gather new experiences and create some wonderful memories.

Simon, V. , Czobor, P. , Bálint, S. , et al: :Prevalence and correlates of adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a meta-analysis. Br J Psychiatry194(3):204–211, 2009

Authors note:  We do not have ADHD ourselves but as psychologists we have worked with hundreds of people with ADHD and also the common co-morbid traits of ASD or anxiety.  Our perspective is based on a broad knowledge of ADHD rather than an in-depth knowledge of the condition as from an individual perspective. We feel that both have value so am pleased to note down our advice for travelling if you have ADHD or if you are travelling with someone with ADHD. We hope that it is useful.

ADHD advice and information has increased significantly in recent years, which is both a brilliant and daunting thing. ADHD is what is called a neurodevelopmental condition. This means that it starts in childhood and can affect people for their whole lives. ADHD, or Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, affects 1/50 – 1/20 people (Simon et al, 2009) and usually comes in two types; ADHD – combined type (where people have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity combined with impulsivity) and ADHD – inattentive subtype, also known as ADD, where only the symptoms of inattention are present (Most adults tend to find that their inattentive symptoms remain over the lifespan and these actually can cause the most problems for them especially when travelling.)

Example Travel Letter for those taking ADHD medication overseas.

This letter needs to be written by your prescribing health care professional and this is just an example of what could be written. It is illegal to write one yourself as you would be impersonating another person i.e. fraud.

To Whom It May Concern, 

Diagnosis: Adult ADHD – Combined Sub Type.

Treatment: Concerta XL 18mg 

The above patient is a current client of the UK ADHD Clinic. He/she/they will be traveling to Dublin on holiday from 1.1.2020 until 1.2.2020. Please see flight details below:

He is currently prescribed Elvanse 70mg daily (1 x 70mg capsule in the morning) and will have in his possession enough medication to cover this period.

The prescriber is: Dr Joe Bloggs of the London GP Surgery.

The overseeing Medical Consultant is: Dr Josephine Bloggs of the UK ADHD Clinic. 

If you have any queries please do not hesitate to contact me on the above number.

Yours faithfully,

If you liked this article, please check out our Travel and mental health guide (part 1)

COPYRIGHT © 2021-2024 DR CHARLOTTE RUSSELL. UNAUTHORISED USE AND/OR DUPLICATION OF THIS MATERIAL WITHOUT EXPRESS AND WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THIS SITE’S OWNER IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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Tips for travellers with ADHD

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Travel can be thrilling, but also challenging for adults with ADHD — a neurological condition marked by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity. The planning, organization and research it takes to book accommodation and flights, pack and more can be overwhelming. If you’re packing for yourself and littles, remembering the details is even more challenging. And remaining in airplane seats, or a car for long periods can cause agitation. 

But these hurdles shouldn’t prevent you from travelling if you have ADHD — you just need a game plan. Here’s some tips for managing ADHD symptoms on your trip and other tips for travelling with ADHD. 

You’ve got this.  

Planning your vacation

Guided tours can reduce stress for people with ADHD, who may become frustrated by the attention to detail required to plan a vacation. Guided tours allow you to just show up while the hard part is handled by your tour company. You can also better customize your vacation by hiring a private tour guide.  

If you don’t want too much structured time and want to have a hand in the planning, do some research on travel apps that can make the process easier. “ Apps like Asana, Trello or Google Keep can be great for creating packing lists or setting reminders for important tasks,” writes the staff of Done., a therapeutic help site for people with ADHD . Remember to plan downtime in your travel schedule so you don’t burn out. It’s better to fully enjoy a few places, instead of becoming overwhelmed rushing about.  

Don’t forget to purchase travel insurance. You should know that your Canadian government health insurance may not fully protect you if venture outside of your home province. Travel insurance by Allianz Global Assistance may help fill coverage gaps in case you experience a medical or dental emergency while travelling. We also offer trip cancellation benefits, which reimburse non-refundable expenses if your trip is cancelled for covered reasons .  

Creating a packing checklist

Write, or type (whichever works best for you) a list of what you need to pack. Keep this list as a template for all trips and amend as needed. This works best if you start the list well before you start packing. And don’t wait until the night before, or heaven forbid the morning of to start packing! (Trust me, I’ve done this and it’s panic inducing.) You want to feel relaxed and not stressed about potentially forgetting something.  

And give yourself grace, writes William Curb on the Hacking your ADHD blog , “We’re probably still going to forget things when we’re travelling. It’s just bound to happen, but we can use those times as learning lessons and just add whatever we forgot to our packing list template so that next time we’ll know to bring it with us.” 

Curb adds that a packing list can also be helpful for people who tend to over pack for trips. “Just make a note in your packing template that you realized you realized that you didn’t use something for your trip,” Curb Writes. “I wouldn’t straight delete it from the list but at least put an asterisk next to it so that [you] know [you] should think twice before packing it next time.” 

How to get to your destination

Manage your documents and medications.

Consider making copies of your travel documents. Take a copy with you on your trip and leave the other with a friend or family member at home. You may find it useful to keep your documents on your phone. Evernote is a great resource to keep documents such as hotel and car reservations in one place, Curb advises. “You can also keep your boarding passes on your phone with Wallet on iOS and Passes on Android,” Curb adds. 

Be sure you have enough medication to last your entire trip or plan to refill your prescription well before your trip. Pack your medication in your carry on; checked luggage is often lost or delayed. Keep in mind that stimulants taken to manage ADHD symptoms are controlled substances. In some destinations, you could be charged with possession of a controlled substance if your medication is not in its original prescription bottle, labeled with your name. 

Take care of your health

Stay hydrated and don’t let yourself get hungry. “Hunger or dehydration can intensify ADHD symptoms” writes the Done. team. “Having a bottle of water and some healthy snacks on hand can help keep your energy levels stable and your mind focused.”

Exercise can help you manage ADHD symptoms, so be sure to work it into your travel plans. Who doesn’t love strolling through an exciting new city? Take steps to manage your sleep. If noise keeps you awake at night or you find it distracting during down time, invest in noise cancelling headphones. Ask for a tucked away hotel room away from elevators, ice machines, the hotel bar and other noisy areas.   Get a quote today to find out how we can make your next trip stress free.  

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11 Best Travel Insurance Companies in July 2024

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Many, or all, of the products featured on this page are from our advertising partners who compensate us when you take certain actions on our website or click to take an action on their website. However, this does not influence our evaluations. Our opinions are our own. Here is a list of our partners and here's how we make money .

If the past few years have shown us anything, it’s that travelers need to be prepared for the unexpected — from a pandemic to flight troubles to the crowded airport terminals so many of us have encountered.

If you don't have sufficient travel insurance coverage via your credit card , you can supplement your policies with third-party plans.

Whether you’re looking for an international travel insurance plan, emergency medical care or a policy that includes extreme sports, these are the best travel insurance providers to get you covered.

How we found the best travel insurance

We looked at quotes from various companies for a 10-day trip to Mexico in September 2024. The traveler was a 55-year-old woman from Florida who spent $3,000 total on the trip, including airfare.

On average, the price of each company’s most basic coverage plan was $126.53. The costs displayed below do not include optional add-ons, such as Cancel For Any Reason coverage or pre-existing medical condition coverage.

Read our full analysis about the average cost of travel insurance so you can budget better for your next trip.

However, depending on the plan, you may be able to customize at an added cost.

As we continue to evaluate more travel insurance companies and receive fresh market data, this collection of best travel insurance companies is likely to change. See our full methodology for more details.

Best insurance companies

Types of travel insurance

What does travel insurance cover, what’s not covered, how much does it cost, do i need travel insurance, how to choose the best travel insurance policy, what are the top travel destinations in 2024, more resources for travel insurance shoppers.

Top credit cards with travel insurance

Methodology

Best travel insurance overall: berkshire hathaway travel protection.

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Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection

  • ExactCare Value (basic) plan is among the least expensive we surveyed.
  • Speciality plans available for road trips, luxury travel, adventure activities, flights and cruises.
  • Company may reimburse claimants faster than average, including possible same-day compensation.
  • Multiple "Trip Delay" coverage types might make claims confusing.
  • Cheapest plan only includes fixed amounts for its coverage.

Under the direction of chair and CEO Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection has been around since 2014. Its plans provide numerous opportunities for travelers to customize coverage to their needs.

At $135 for our sample trip, the ExactCare Value (basic) plan from Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection offers protection roughly $10 above the average price.

Want something cheaper? Air travelers looking for inexpensive, less comprehensive protections might opt for a basic AirCare plan that includes fixed amounts for its coverage .

Read our full review of Berkshire Hathaway .

What else makes Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection great:

Pre-existing medical condition exclusion waivers available at nearly all plan levels. 

Plans available for travelers going on a cruise, participating in extreme sports or taking a luxury trip.

ExactCare Value (basic) plan was among the least expensive we surveyed.

Best for emergency medical coverage: Allianz Global Assistance

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Annual or single-trip policies are available.

  • Multiple types of insurance available.
  • All plans include access to a 24/7 assistance hotline.
  • More expensive than average.
  • CFAR upgrades are not available.
  • Rental car protection is only available by adding the One Trip Rental Car protector to your plan or by purchasing a standalone rental car plan.

Allianz Global Assistance is a reputable travel insurance company offering plans for over 25 years. Customers can choose from a variety of single and annual policies to fit their needs. On top of comprehensive coverage, some travelers might opt for the more affordable OneTrip Cancellation Plus, which is geared toward domestic travelers looking for trip protections but don’t need post-departure benefits like emergency medical or baggage lost.

For our test trip, Allianz Global Assistance’s basic coverage cost $149, about $22 above average.

What else makes Allianz Global Assistance great:

Annual and single-trip plans.

Plans are available for international and domestic trips.

Stand-alone and add-on rental car damage product available.

Read our full review of Allianz Global Assistance .

Best for travelers with pre-existing medical conditions: Travel Guard by AIG

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Travel Guard by AIG

  • Offers last-minute coverage.
  • Pre-Existing Medical Conditions Exclusion Waiver available at all plan levels.
  • Plan available for business travelers.
  • Cancel For Any reason coverage only available for higher-level plans, and only reimburses up to 50% of the trip cost.
  • Trip interruption coverage doesn't apply to trips paid for with points and miles.

Travel Guard by AIG offers a variety of plans and coverages to fit travelers’ needs. On top of more standard trip protections like trip cancellation, interruption, baggage and medical coverage, the Cancel For Any Reason upgrade is available on certain Travel Guard plans, which allows you to cancel a trip for any reason and get 50% of your nonrefundable deposit back as long as the trip is canceled at least two days before the scheduled departure date.

At $107 for our sample trip, the Essential plan was below average, saving roughly $20.

What else makes Travel Guard by AIG great:

Three comprehensive plans and a Pack N' Go plan for last-minute travelers who don't need cancellation benefits.

Flight protection, car rental, and medical evacuation coverage, as well as annual plans available.

Pre-existing medical conditions exclusion waiver available on all plan levels, as long as it's purchased within 15 days.

Read our full review of Travel Guard by AIG .

Best for those who pack expensive equipment: Travel Insured International

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Travel Insured International

  • Higher-level plan include optional add-ons for event tickets and for electronic equipment
  • Rental car protection add-on for just $8 per day, even on lower-level plan.
  • Many of the customizations are only available on the higher-tier plan.
  • Coverage cost comes in above average in our latest analysis.

Travel Insured International offers several customization options. For instance, those going to see a show may want to add on event ticket registration fee protection. Traveling with expensive gear?Consider adding on coverage for electronic equipment for up to $2,000 in coverage.

Be sure to check which policies are available in your state. You will need to input your destination, residence, trip dates and the number of travelers to get a quote and see coverages.

What else makes Travel Insured International great:

Comprehensive plans include medical expense reimbursement accidents, sickness, evacuation and pre-existing conditions, depending on the plan.

Flight plans include coverage for missed and canceled flights and lost or stolen baggage.

Read our full review of Travel Insured International .

Best for adventurous travelers: World Nomads

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World Nomads

  • Travelers can extend coverage mid-trip.
  • The standard plan covers up to $300,000 in emergency evacuation costs.
  • Plans automatically cover 200+ adventurous activities.
  • No Cancel For Any Reason upgrades are available.
  • No pre-existing medical condition waivers are available.

Many travel insurance plans contain exclusions for adventure sports activities. If you plan to ski, bungee jump, windsurf or parasail, this might be a plan to consider.

Note that the Standard plan ($72 for our sample trip), while the most affordable, provides less coverage than other plans. But it can be a good choice for travelers who are satisfied with trip cancellation and interruption coverage of $2,500 or less, do not need rental car damage protection, find the limits to be sufficient and do not need coverage for certain more adventurous activities.

What else makes World Nomads great:

Comprehensive international travel insurance plans.

Coverage available for adventure activities, such as trekking, mountain biking and scuba diving.

Read our full review of World Nomads .

Best for medical coverage: Travelex Insurance Services

insurance-product-card-logo

Travelex Insurance Services

  • Top-tier plan doesn’t break the bank and provides more customization opportunities.
  • Offers a plan specifically for domestic travel.
  • Sells a post-departure medical coverage plan.
  • Fewer customization opportunities on the Basic plan.
  • Though perhaps a plus for domestic travelers, keep in mind the Travel America plan only covers domestic trips.

For starters, basic coverage from Travelex Insurance Services came in at $125, almost exactly average for our sample trip.

Travelex’s plans focus heavily on providing protections that are personalized to your travel style and trip type.

While the company does offer comprehensive plans that include medical benefits, you can also choose between cheaper plans that don’t provide cancellation coverage but do offer protections during your travels.

Read our full review of Travelex Insurance Services .

What else makes Travelex Insurance Services great:

Three comprehensive plans available, two of which cover international trips.

Offers a post-departure plan geared exclusively toward disruptions after you leave home.

Two flight insurance plans available.

Best if you have travel credit card coverage: Seven Corners

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Seven Corners

  • Annual, medical-only and backpacker plans are available.
  • Cancel For Any Reason upgrade is available for the cheapest plan.
  • Cheapest plan also features a much less costly Interruption for Any Reason add-on.
  • Offers only one annual policy option.

Each Seven Corners plan offers several optional add-ons. Among the more unique is a Trip Interruption for Any Reason, which allows you to interrupt a trip 48 hours after the scheduled departure date (for any reason) and receive a refund of up to 75% of your unused nonrefundable deposits.

» Jump to the best cards with travel insurance

The basic coverage plan for our trip to Mexico costs $124 — right around the average.

What else makes Seven Corners great:

Comprehensive plans for U.S. residents and foreigners, including travelers visiting the U.S.

Cheap add-ons for rental car damage, sporting equipment rental or trip interruption for any reason.

Read our full review of Seven Corners .

Best for long-term travelers: IMG

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  • Coverage available for adventure travelers.
  • Offers direct billing.
  • Claim approval can be lengthy.

While some travel insurance companies offer just a handful of plans, with IMG, you’ll really have your pick. Though this requires a bit more research, it allows you to search for coverage that fits your travel needs.

However, travelers will want to be aware that IMG’s iTravelInsured Travel Lite is expensive. Coming in at $149.85, it’s the costliest plan on our list.

Read our full review of IMG .

What else makes IMG great:

More affordable than average.

Many plans to choose from to fit your needs.

Best for travelers with unpredictable work demands: Tin Leg

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  • In addition Cancel For Any Reason, some plans offer cancel for work reason coverage.
  • Adventure sports-specific coverage is available.
  • Plans have overlap that can be hard to distinguish.
  • Only one plan includes Rental Car Damage coverage available as an add-on.

Tin Leg’s Basic plan came in at $134 for our sample trip, adding about $8 onto the average basic policy cost. Note that you’ll pay a lot more if you shop for the most comprehensive coverage, and there are eight plans to choose from for trips abroad.

The multitude of plans can help you find coverage that fits your needs, but with so many to choose from, deciding can be daunting.

The only real way to figure out your ideal plan is to compare them all, look at the plan details and decide which features and coverage suit you and your travel style best.

Read our full Tin Leg review .

Best for booking travel with points and miles: TravelSafe

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  • Covers up to $300 redepositing points and miles on eligible canceled award flights.
  • Optional add-on protection for business equipment or sports rentals.
  • Multi-trip or year-long plans aren’t available.

Selecting your travel insurance plan with TravelSafe is a fairly straightforward process. The company’s website also makes it easy to visualize how optional add-on elements influence the total cost, displaying the final price as soon as you click the coverage.

However, at $136, the Basic plan was among the more expensive for our trip to Mexico.

What else makes TravelSafe great:

Rental car damage coverage add-on is available on both plans.

Cancel For Any Reason coverage available on the TravelSafe Classic plan.

Read our full TravelSafe review .

Best for group travel insurance: HTH Insurance

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HTH Travel Insurance

  • Covers travelers up to 95 years old.
  • Includes direct pay option so members can avoid having to pay up front for services.
  • A 24-hour delay is required for baggage delay coverage on the TripProtector Economy plan.
  • No waivers for pre-existing conditions on the lower-level plan.

HTH offers single-trip and multitrip medical insurance coverage as well as trip protection plans.

At around $125, the Trip Protector Economy policy is at the average mark for plans we reviewed.

You can choose to insure group trips for educators, crew, religious missionaries and corporate travelers.

What else makes HTH Insurance great:

Medical-only coverage and trip protection coverage.

Lots of options for group travelers.

Read our full review of HTH Insurance .

As you shop for travel insurance, you’ll find many of the same coverage categories across numerous plans.

Trip cancellation

This covers the prepaid costs you make for your trip in cases when you need to cancel for a covered reason. This coverage helps you recoup upfront costs paid for flights and nonrefundable hotel reservations.

Trip interruption

Trip interruption benefits generally involve disruptions after you depart. It helps reimburse costs incurred for flight delays, cancellations and plenty of other covered disruptions you might encounter during your travels.

This coverage can cover the costs for you to return home or reimburse unexpected expenses like an extra hotel stay, meals and ground transportation.

Trip delay coverage helps cover unexpected costs when your trip is delayed. This is another coverage that helps offset the costs of flight trouble or other travel disruptions.

Note that many policies have a total amount a traveler can claim, with caps on per diem benefits, too.

Cancel For Any Reason

Cancel For Any Reason coverage allows you to recoup some of the upfront costs you paid for a trip even if you’re canceling for a reason not otherwise covered by your standard travel insurance policy.

Typically, adding this protection to your plan costs extra.

Baggage delay

This coverage helps cover the costs of essential items you might need when your luggage is delayed. Think toiletries, clothing and other immediate items you might need if your luggage didn’t make it on your flight.

Many travel insurance plans with baggage delay protection will specify how long (six, 12, 24 hours, etc.) your luggage must be delayed before you can make a claim.

Lost baggage

Used for travelers whose luggage is lost or stolen, this helps recoup the lost value of the items in your bag.

You’ll want to make sure you closely follow the correct procedures for your plan. Many plans include a maximum total amount you can claim under this coverage and a per-item cap.

Travel medical insurance

This covers out-of-pocket medical costs when travelers run into an emergency.

Because many travelers’ health insurance plans don’t cover medical care overseas, travel medical insurance can help offset out-of-pocket health care costs.

In addition to emergency medical coverage, many plans have medical evacuation or repatriation coverage for costs incurred when you must be taken to a hospital or return to your home country because of a medical situation.

Most travel insurance plans cover many trip protections that can help you be prepared for unexpected travel disruptions and expenses.

These coverages are generally aimed at protecting the money you put into your trip, expenses you incur because of travel trouble and costs incurred if you have a medical emergency overseas.

On top of core coverages like trip cancellation and interruption and travel medical coverage, some plans offer add-on options like waivers for pre-existing conditions, rental car collision damage waivers or adventure sports riders. These usually cost extra or must be added within a specified timeframe.

Typical travel insurance policies offer coverage for many unforeseen events, but as you research to select a plan, consider your needs. Though every plan differs, there are some commonly excluded coverages.

For instance, you typically can’t get coverage for a named storm if you bought the coverage after the storm was named. In other words, if you have a trip to the Caribbean booked for Sept. 25 and on Sept. 20 a hurricane develops and is named, you generally won’t be able to buy a travel insurance plan Sept. 21 in hopes of getting your money back.

Many plans also don’t cover activities performed under the influence of drugs or alcohol or any extreme sports. If the latter applies to you, you might want to consider a plan with specific coverages for adventure-seekers.

For numerous plans, a few other situations don’t qualify as an acceptable reason to cancel and make a claim, such as fear of travel, medical tourism or pregnancies (unless you booked a trip and bought insurance before you became pregnant or there are complications with the pregnancy). This is where a Cancel For Any Reason add-on to your coverage can be helpful.

You can also run into trouble if you give up on a trip too soon: a minor (or even multihour) flight delay likely isn’t sufficient to cancel your entire trip and get reimbursed through your plan. Be sure to review what requirements your specific plan has when it comes to canceling a trip, claiming trip interruption, etc.

Travel insurance costs vary widely. The final price of your plan will fluctuate based on your age, length of trip and destination.

It will also depend on how much coverage you need, whether you add on specialized policies (like Cancel For Any Reason or pre-existing conditions coverage), whether you plan to participate in extreme sports and other factors.

In our examples above, for instance, the 35-year-old traveler taking a $2,000 trip to Italy would have spent an average $76 for a basic plan to get coverage for things like trip cancellation and interruption, baggage protection, etc. That’s a little less than 4% of the total trip cost — lower than average.

If there were multiple members in a traveling party or if they were going on, say, a rock-climbing or bungee-jumping excursion, the costs would go up.

On average, travel insurance comes to about 5% to 10% of the trip cost. However, considering many of the plans reimburse up to 100% of the trip cost (or more) for disruptions like trip cancellation or interruption, it can be a worthwhile expense if something goes wrong.

It depends. Consider the following factors that might affect your decision: You’re young and healthy, all your bookings are refundable or cancelable without a penalty, your flights are nonstop, you’re not checking bags and a credit card you carry offers some travel protections . In that case, travel insurance might not be necessary.

On the other hand, if you prepaid a large chunk of money for a nonrefundable African safari, you’re going on a Caribbean cruise in the middle of a hurricane season or you’re going somewhere where the cost of health care is high, it’s not a bad idea to buy a travel insurance plan. Here’s how to find the best travel insurance coverage for you.

If you’re thinking of booking a trip and not planning to buy travel insurance, you may want to consider at least booking refundable airfare and not prepaying for hotel, rental car and activity reservations. That way, if something goes wrong, you can cancel without losing any money.

Selecting the best travel insurance policy comes down to your needs, concerns, preferences and budget.

As you book, take a few minutes to consider what most concerns you. Is it getting stranded because of flight trouble? Having the ability to cancel for any reason you see fit without losing money? Getting sick or injured right before departure and needing to postpone the trip? Injuring yourself or falling ill while overseas?

Ultimately, you want a plan that protects you, your money and the large investment in your trip — but doesn’t cost too much, either.

Medical coverage. If your priority is having adequate medical coverage abroad, you might want to look for plans with high limits for medical emergencies and medical evacuation.

Complex travel itinerary. If your itinerary has lots of flight connections, prepaid hotels and deposits for activities you can’t get back, prioritizing a plan with the best coverage for trip cancellations or interruptions may land at the top of your list.

Travel uncertainty. If you’re on the fence about a trip and have nonrefundable reservations, you may want to select a plan with a Cancel For Any Reason coverage option, which can help you recoup about 50% to 75% of the costs. This helps provide peace of mind, placing the decision on whether to travel entirely in your hands.

Car rentals. If you’re renting a car, a collision damage waiver is often worth looking into.

The following destinations are the top insured destinations in 2024, according to Squaremouth (a NerdWallet partner).

The Bahamas.

Costa Rica.

Antarctica.

In 2022, travelers spent about 25.53% more on trips than they did before the pandemic.

As of December, NerdWallet analysis determined travel prices are 10% higher than pre-pandemic. Each statistic makes a strong case for protecting your travel investment as you plan your next trip.

Bookmark these resources to help you make smart money moves as you shop for travel insurance.

What is travel insurance?

CFAR explained.

Is travel insurance worth getting?

10 credit cards that provide travel insurance.

We used the following factors to choose insurance providers to highlight:

Breadth of coverage: We looked at how many plans each company offered plus the range of their standard plans. 

Depth of coverage: We considered two data points to get a sense of how much each company pays out for common travel issues — the maximum caps for trip cancellation and trip interruption claims.

Cost: By looking at the costs for basic coverage across multiple companies, we determined an average cost for shoppers to benchmark plan prices against.

Customizability: While standard plans can cover a lot of ground, sometimes you need something a little more personal.

Customer satisfaction. Using data from Squaremouth when available, and Google Reviews as a backup, we can give kudos to companies with better track records from their clients.

No, it doesn’t necessarily get more expensive the longer you wait to purchase. However, as you put off buying insurance, you may lose access to potential plans and coverage options.

In general, buying travel insurance within a few days to two weeks of prepaying or making an initial deposit for your trip is your best bet. Assuming you’re not booking last-minute, this will provide you with access to the widest possible range of coverage options. It also helps prevent any medical conditions or storms that pop up between booking and buying a plan from ending up as excluded situations, which won’t be covered by your plan.

But, generally, many plans do allow you to buy coverage quite close to your departure date.

To get the most out of your travel insurance plan, buy it soon after making your initial prepayment or deposit to ensure you have access to the biggest menu of plans possible.

Select a plan that’s comprehensive enough to cover the travel scenarios you’re most concerned about or likely to encounter but not too expensive or laden with protections you’d never likely need.

Whatever your coverage, thoroughly review the plan so you understand what’s covered and what’s not, plus how to adhere to the plan’s rules for making a claim.

Travelers frequently use phrases like “trip insurance” and “travel insurance,” as well as “trip protection,” interchangeably, but they do mean different things, according to Stan Sandberg, founder of insurance comparison site TravelInsurance.com.

Trip insurance, or trip protection, generally refers to predeparture (or preevent) coverage if you need to cancel. You may see these plans sold by airlines, online travel agencies or even ticketed event sellers.

“You could refer to it as the portion that protects the investment in the trip,” Sandberg says.

A travel insurance plan typically includes that — plus more comprehensive benefits to protect you during your trip, from medical coverage to trip delay and lost baggage protections, and many more elements, depending on the plan.

Though travel insurance is typically not required for international trips, your personal circumstances will play a key role in whether it’s a good investment.

For instance, young, healthy travelers with few prepaid trip expenses embarking on a relatively risk-free trip may not see a need to buy a plan.

Older travelers with complicated itineraries who are visiting destinations where they could potentially fall ill or get injured — or who could encounter bad weather or some other disrupting factor along the way — may want to buy coverage.

Consider a few key questions:

How well would your health insurance plan cover you if you needed to visit a hospital overseas?

How much did you prepay for a hotel or rental car?

How much money would you be out if weather or some other flight issue derailed your itinerary?

Could you afford an unexpected night in a city where you have a connecting flight?

Do you already have a credit card that provides some travel protections?

Your answers to these questions can help you decide whether you need travel insurance for your international trip.

In general, buying travel insurance

within a few days to two weeks of prepaying or making an initial deposit

for your trip is your best bet. Assuming you’re not booking last-minute, this will provide you with access to the widest possible range of coverage options. It also helps prevent any medical conditions or storms that pop up between booking and buying a plan from ending up as excluded situations, which won’t be covered by your plan.

How to maximize your rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are some of the best travel credit cards of 2024 :

Flexibility, point transfers and a large bonus: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

No annual fee: Bank of America® Travel Rewards credit card

Flat-rate travel rewards: Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card

Bonus travel rewards and high-end perks: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

Luxury perks: The Platinum Card® from American Express

Business travelers: Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

IHG One Rewards Premier Credit Card

IHG® One Rewards Premier Credit Card

Earn 5 free nights at an IHG property after $4k in spend (each night valued at up to 60k points).

travel insurance adhd

International Travel with Medications: Know Before You Go

When you travel with medications abroad, good planning can help avoid getting your prescriptions confiscated — or worse.

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Traveling with Prescription Medications

When you embark on international travel with medications, especially prescription drugs, it pays to know the rules. Of course, you probably won't be sentenced to years in a hard labor camp, as Brittney Griner was in 2022 after she entered Russia with medical marijuana. ( She was released months later.) But prescription drugs that are perfectly legal in the US may be illegal to bring into another country. 

And if you thought medications containing controlled substances were the only types you needed to be careful about traveling with, you’d be wrong — very wrong. Being prepared and in compliance with your destination's regulations is key to having a trouble-free trip.

Medicines commonly prescribed or available over the counter in the United States might be unlicensed or considered controlled substances in other countries. When traveling internationally with your medicines, you need to be aware of potential regulations before departing on your trip.   

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Before you travel with medications

You should contact the  consulate or embassy of your destination , and embassies of countries that you have layovers in to make sure your medicines are permitted. Authorities overseas may ask for evidence to prove the medication is yours. To avoid having your medication confiscated ask your doctor for a letter stating: what the medicine is, your dosage and that it's for personal use. The U.S, State department recommends that travelers should: 

  • Keep medicines in their original, labeled containers. Check that they are clearly labeled with your full name, health care provider’s name, generic and brand name, and exact dosage.
  • Make sure the name on your prescription matches the name on your travel documents and identification.
  • Bring copies of all written prescriptions, including the generic names for medicines. For extra safekeeping leave a copy of your prescriptions at home with a friend or relative in case you lose your copy. You can request a "Copy Only of a Prescription " from your pharmacy which includes the relevant information but is not valid for dispensing.
  • It's essential that you ask your prescribing health care provider for a note if you use controlled substances or injectable medicines, such as EpiPens and insulin.

The following is a summary of regulations that are typical to many countries, according to the International Narcotics Control Board . 

  • A medical prescription from a licensed doctor is required by most countries
  • The prescription should be translated into the local language. For some countries, a translation in English will suffice
  • Many countries do not permit carrying more than a 30 to 90 day supply of a prescription
  • Requirements for foreigners might differ from requirements for citizens of that country
  • Different requirements might be in place depending on where you are travelling from

What to do if your if your medication is not permitted into your destination. Do not attempt to travel with banned/prohibited medications or dosages. Contact your healthcare provider before you travel to see if there is a suitable alternative you can take instead.

Understand the law in your destination

Finding out if your medication is restricted can be challenging. Laws are country-specific and regulations can be hard to interpret. If you are not in compliance your medication could be confiscated, you could be denied entry or you could be detained. A 2024 survey found that 27% of Americans have had their medications confiscated during travel, according to the discount drug app, SingleCare. Fortunately, most travelers are able to take or "import" their medications without incident. 

Medications are regulated according to the type of medication, the amount and destination. Not all medicine you take in the U.S. is available in other countries. Some common medicines may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance. Commonly restricted drugs include:

  • Amphetamines, such as ADHD medications
  • Medical marijuana/cannabis
  • Opioid-based painkillers, such as codeine and oxycodone
  • Medication containing pseudoephedrine, such as cold and flu tablets
  • Sleeping pills, anti-anxiety and antidepressant medications.

The amount of prescription medication you can take with you varies depending on your destination's regulations. Travelers are typically permitted to bring 30 to 90 day supplies of maintenance drugs, such as insulin, corticosteroid inhalers and high blood pressure medications. 

Medication that contains a controlled substance is highly regulated. Countries put strict limitations on the types and quantities that can be imported. Some countries allow a 30-day supply, while others only allow a few days and might require an import license or permit to travel with certain medications or dosages.

Traveling to Japan. Japan has strict drug laws and they are vigorously enforced. Many common medications and over-the-counter drugs in the United States are illegal in Japan. It does not matter if you have a valid U.S. prescription for a medicine or drug which is illegal in Japan: if you bring it with you, you risk arrest and detention by the Japanese authorities.

Comprehensive information about what drugs and  dosages are legal is available only from the Japanese government. Travelers should check with the Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MLHW) before traveling to Japan with medication. If you need to bring more than the MLHW’s approved quantity of medication or medical devices you need to secure a “Yunyu Kakunin-sho” (importation certificate) prior to travelling, and present it with the prescription to a customs officer upon arrival in Japan. You can learn more about applying for a Yunyu Kakunin-sho in the MLHW's FAQs . You can also make inquire about the legality of your medications via email at  [email protected] . You should include the drug’s active ingredients, the name of the medicine (brand and generic) and the dosage and quantity you are prescribed. 

The following drugs are illegal in Japan: marijuana including CBD oil, all medications that contain amphetamines and many common American over-the-counter and prescription medications, including ones for pain, ADHD, depression and many decongestant and allergy medications. 

Prepare a travel health kit 

Having your medication organized and easy to locate can make the customs and passport control process more orderly. Your health kit should contain the medications you may need, especially those items that may be difficult to find at your destination. Include your prescription and over-the-counter medicines and take enough to last your entire trip, plus extra in case of travel delays. Pack medications in a carry on in case your luggage is lost or delayed.

Avoid buying medicine in other countries

Counterfeit drugs are common in some countries, so only use medicine you bring from home and make sure to pack enough for the duration of your trip, plus extra in case of travel delays. If you must buy drugs during your trip in an emergency contact the nearest  US embassy or consulate .  They can help you locate medical services and notify your friends, family, or employer if needed. They are available for emergencies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, overseas and in Washington, DC and can be reached at 888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444.

Bottom line

Plan ahead. Get the information you need before you go. When you're informed, you can take steps to reduce the risk of having problems with medication or medical equipment while you're away. If you run out of medication,  contact the U.S. embassy  to be connected with local healthcare professionals, and avoid buying medications in open markets because they may not be safe.

You may also want to check the  International Narcotics Control Board  website that provides general information about narcotics and controlled substances, for countries that have information available. Better safe than sorry, 

Related Content

  • Travel Medical Insurance: Here’s What You Need to Know
  • 24 Best Travel Websites and Apps to Find Deals and Save You Money
  • How to Avoid Annoying Hotel Fees: Per Person, Parking and More
  • The 10 Safest Countries to Visit

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Donna joined Kiplinger as a personal finance writer in 2023. She spent more than a decade as the contributing editor of J.K.Lasser's Your Income Tax Guide and edited state specific legal treatises at ALM Media. She has shared her expertise as a guest on Bloomberg, CNN, Fox, NPR, CNBC and many other media outlets around the nation. 

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Useful Pages

Travel insurance for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd).

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric condition that affects an individual’s behaviour in terms of restlessness, impulsiveness, and distraction. It is more commonly diagnosed during the early stages of childhood, and appears more frequently in men.

If you have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you may have concerns about travelling or might be struggling to find cover for your diagnosis. Medical Travel Insurance can help you enjoy your holiday with peace of mind that your medical condition is covered. We offer competitive insurance rates that include coverage for ADHD, as well as other psychiatric conditions, across all our cover types, including single trip and annual multi-trip policies.

What Does Medical Travel Insurance Cover?

Medical Travel Insurance covers a vast range of medical conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Depending on the type of policy you choose, you’ll have available cover for emergency medical expenses, cancellation or curtailment, and repatriation. You will also be covered for personal accident and liability, personal belongings, and legal expenses.

Medical Travel Insurance does not cover pre-existing medical conditions that you have not declared when taking out your policy or during your medical screening. It is very important to read the policy document thoroughly before purchasing a policy to make sure you are aware of any exclusions, especially with regard to your ADHD.

How Can I Get Medical Travel Insurance for ADHD?

Getting Medical Travel Insurance for ADHD is simple. All you need to do is request a quote and input your travel dates and destination. Then, complete the medical screening for the necessary travellers, click to get prices and see what options we have for you!

Don't Let ADHD Stop You from Travelling - Get Medical Travel Insurance Now.

In need of assistance?

Our medical travel insurance team are ready to provide you with assistance regarding your quote. If you would prefer to talk to an advisor to receive a quote or have a query please contact our UK based customer service team. Find out details on our contact us page .

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Medical travel insurance is an online comparison website for those with pre-existing medical conditions requiring travel insurance. Medical travel insurance www.medicaltravelinsurance.co.uk is a trading style of Brokersure Ltd. Brokersure is authorised and regulated by the FCA.

For more information regarding Medical Travel Insurance click here , alternatively phone or email us.

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Travel insurance for a pre-existing medical condition

How to secure cover for your next trip if you're dealing with existing medical conditions..

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Checked for accuracy by our qualified fact-checkers and verifiers. Find out more about fact-checking at CHOICE .

Need to know

  • You must declare a pre-existing medical condition if you want it covered by insurance
  • Insurance cover for pre-existing medical conditions varies widely
  • You may have to pay more to get cover for your pre-existing medical condition

Travel insurance is essential in the case of illness or injury while travelling. Overseas medical costs can be extortionate, and if you have an existing medical condition, it increases the chance you may need medical attention on your trip – that's why insurers charge you extra. 

So if you can get cover for your pre-existing medical condition, it'll take a bit of worry out of your trip. But even if you're willing to pay extra, getting cover for an existing condition isn't always easy.

On this page:

What is a pre-existing medical condition?

What's covered, and what's not, comprehensive policies that may cover your pre-existing medical condition, travel insurance for seniors with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnancy and travel insurance, credit card travel insurance and pre-existing medical conditions,  what to do if you can't get cover for a pre-existing medical condition.

A pre-existing medical condition is a medical condition that you had before you bought your travel insurance.

Different travel insurers will have their own specific definitions, but it's usually a diagnosed medical condition that you've had or received any form of medical advice, treatment or medication for, in a specified time period before you bought your policy.

Most insurers would cover a condition if it hadn't led to treatment in the one to two years before you booked your trip, but others may specify five years or longer

The 'specified time period' wording is worth paying attention to. If, for example, your condition last showed symptoms 18 months ago, but the time period specified by the insurer is 12 months, then you'll be covered subject to the other conditions of the policy.

The insurance contract regulations set the time period as six months by default. Unfortunately, insurers can get around this six-month rule and exempt themselves simply by burying an exclusion or limitation in the product disclosure statement (PDS).

Insurers' definitions vary as to what the specified time period is. Most insurers would cover a condition if it hadn't led to treatment in the one to two years before you booked your trip, but others may specify five years or longer.

There are often a lot of hoops to jump through to get cover for pre-existing conditions. 

Insurers can:

  • exclude pre-existing medical conditions altogether
  • include a list of accepted pre-existing medical conditions (specified in the PDS)
  • restrict cover for generally accepted conditions depending on other conditions you might have, or only cover some symptoms (for example, allergies may be covered, but not anaphylaxis)
  • subject you to an assessment for cover of your medical condition and charge a fee to complete this assessment (whether you get cover or not)
  • deny you cover for a medical condition on application.

Even if you survive that minefield, you may then have to fork out several thousand dollars for the privilege of getting cover for your condition.

Below is a list of conditions that might usually be covered, with specific restrictions. 

  • Allergies 
  • Blindness and low vision
  • Corneal graft
  • Coeliac disease
  • Ear grommets
  • Gastric reflux
  • Hiatus hernia
  • High cholesterol/hypercholesterolaemia
  • High blood pressure/hypertension
  • Hip replacement
  • Knee replacement
  • Macular degeneration
  • Underactive thyroid/overactive thyroid
  • Chronic lung conditions
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Reduced immunity
  • Cancer (some policies automatically cover skin cancer but not melanoma)
  • Heart-related medical conditions
  • Medical conditions you're travelling to seek medical treatment or review for
  • Conditions involving drug or alcohol dependency
  • Conditions for which you're awaiting surgery, treatment, investigation or procedures
  • Conditions with a terminal prognosis

This also includes any travel booked or undertaken against the advice of a medical practitioner.

Check the insurer's PDS for a specific list of conditions. If a condition is not listed as automatically covered, then you may be able to apply to the insurer to cover your condition.

For the specified time period, the lower the number, the better. Read on below the table for more information.

* The time period before booking your trip that a medical condition, that isn't specifically excluded, would be covered if it has not given rise to symptoms or required medication or treatment. 

If your medical condition is on the insurer's 'Covered Conditions' list, then the time period might be longer than what's specified above. 

For example, Go Insurance's specified time period is 90 days (3 months), but if your condition is on their 'Covered Conditions' list, and you've been hospitalised for that condition within 24 months of booking the trip, then it may not be automatically covered. You'll need to fill out a form to apply for cover.

CHOICE tip: Filling out assessment forms for your medical condition can be time-consuming and frustrating, but try at least three different insurers because premiums and cover vary widely.

How you're assessed for a pre-existing medical condition

Many Australian insurers use a 'black box' risk rating system to assess your condition, such as that provided by insurance technology firm Verisk.

The systems may contain a list of health conditions, each of which is assigned a risk factor. Depending on how high this risk factor is, the insurer can choose to rule out cover, or offer cover for an extra premium.

Older and wiser travellers with pre-existing medical conditions can still get travel insurance for their international travel. The drawback is that you'll have fewer policies to choose from, and you'll pay more for it. 

Many travel insurance policies have age limits, over which they either don't offer cover, or they may offer restricted cover with lower benefit limits or a higher excess. 

Cost of travel insurance for seniors

Our analysis of premiums across age groups shows that an older single traveller going to Bali for around 11 days to two weeks will on average pay more for their cover as they age, with premiums generally increasing more noticeably from age 50. 

Travellers aged over 70 could pay up to 3.5 times more for their travel insurance than people in their 60s

In particular, travellers aged over 70 could pay up to 3.5 times more for their travel insurance than people in their 60s, prior to further underwriting and premium adjustments by insurers for coverage of pre-existing medical conditions.

Visit our travel insurance comparison and use the filter to find travel insurance policy options for people across a range of ages up to 100 or even unlimited.

Pregnancy cover will protect you in circumstances such as if you need to cancel your trip due to doctor's advice, or if you're on holiday and incur medical costs that are a result of unexpected complications (something that you weren't already being treated for or had no history of).

Note that travel insurance won't usually cover you for childbirth or for medical costs relating to your newborn if you give birth while on holiday.

Different policies will cover you up to different stages of your pregnancy, so which provider you go with will depend on when you plan to travel (and return home). Not all policies will cover IVF or similar medically assisted pregnancies.

CHOICE tip: Check with your airline before you travel – many airlines will only let you fly up to a certain stage in your pregnancy, and may require medical certificates or other documentation.

Some credit cards come with travel insurance policies that may cover pre-existing medical conditions. 

However, policies that come with credit cards vary just as much as standalone travel insurance policies, so you need to read the terms and conditions carefully to understand whether you're automatically covered, whether you need to apply for cover, or if there's no cover at all for pre-existing medical conditions.

Bear in mind that some credit card travel insurance policies require you to activate your insurance before you leave. Some people may find this a bit of a pain, but with pre-existing medical conditions it may actually be an advantage, since it will prompt you to check your cover.

If you're denied cover for your pre-existing medical condition, or if you can't afford the extra premium, you may still be able to buy a travel insurance policy. 

You'll need to declare your condition to your insurer. They may then offer you travel insurance cover, but will issue a certificate that says you won't be covered for any claim that arises because of your pre-existing medical condition.

Stock images:  Getty, unless otherwise stated.

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Travelling with ADHD

If you are an adult who has been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder then you will be among an estimated 1.5 million adults with the condition, according to ADHD Action. It says that 2.5% of adults and 5% of children in the UK have the hereditary condition.

Living with ADHD means an adult will often have difficulty planning things or estimating the time it takes to do tasks such as pack their bags to go off on holiday, organise the correct currency and get to the airport in plenty of time. We are told that one thing adults with ADHD never have enough off is time!

Planning your trip

So, we’ve put together a handy action list so that you can keep your holiday plans on track and not experience any of those dreadful moments when you realise you have forgotten something crucial. So here goes:

  • Start planning a couple of months in advance. Research where you are going so you know what to expect and how easy it will be to see everything on your wishlist. Then email it to yourself so you can access it on your smartphone.
  • Check with your GP that the medication you will be bringing with you is not on a banned substance list in the destination country.
  • And since you are going abroad make sure a few months before that your passport has not expired! That’s a stress you can really do without. Additionally, check out whether or not you need a visa.
  • Book your travel insurance and ensure you are covered if you want to engage in any high-risk sporting activities or ride a moped/quad bike. If you don’t have the right cover, should anything go wrong it could cost you many thousands of pounds for treatment whilst abroad and to get you home. So talk to us here at Direct-Travel Insurance.
  • If you have electronic copies of your travel documents email them to yourself so you can access them on the move and put copies in your suitcase, too.
  • Give yourself extra time to get to the airport and ensure you have plenty to do as boredom is not a great travelling companion to someone with ADHD.

Lastly, go off and enjoy yourself.

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Wonder why your brain operates differently with ADHD? Study shows 'altered' brain wiring

Portrait of Eduardo Cuevas

Children with ADHD have notably different brain functioning when they're resting than children who don't have the neurological disorder, according to a national study released this week.

Scans of thousands of children with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder highlighted a key difference: The National Institutes of Health study in the American Journal of Psychiatry found young people with ADHD had more wiring, or nerve cell networks, in their brains, making it harder for their brains to send clear signals about a task like following instructions or sitting still.

The findings build on evidence that can make it easier for experts to explain how a child's brain circuiting correlates to the ADHD symptoms that teachers or parents may see. In essence, the researchers found that children with ADHD have hyperconnected wiring that may make it harder for their brains to transmit a given signal.

“These are the brain regions that we know to be important in controlling impulsive behaviors and controlling attention,” Luke Norman, a staff scientist at the National Institute of Mental Health and author of the study, told USA TODAY. “These networks appear to be inefficient in ADHD.” 

Drug pricing: ADHD drug prices rise as Adderall shortage leaves patients scrimping to fill prescriptions

Earlier studies of brain function for people with ADHD have involved smaller groups, typically less than 100 participants. None have amassed definitive evidence to identify the parts of the brain affected by ADHD, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a person having difficulty paying attention and staying still. 

The NIH study used thousands of brain scans of children with ADHD traits from six datasets. Outside experts said this larger sample size helps understand how brains work in people with ADHD, even though the results were relatively small because people were resting during the MRI scans and not active.

The study doesn't explore how to diagnose ADHD. That is typically done through evaluations that include input from doctors, teachers and parents. Instead, the findings help identify specific signals in the brain that are in play for people with the disorder, said Lauren Friedman, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University , who was not affiliated with the study.

About 6 million U.S. children ages 3 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, meaning young people facing these challenges make up just under 10% of children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Research suggests genetics play a role in a child developing ADHD, as well as other factors, including premature birth, low birth weight, lead poisoning, brain injuries and use of alcohol or tobacco during pregnancy.

The study also looked at scans of more than 8,000 children who were, on average, younger than 11. Nearly 1,700 of the children were diagnosed ADHD and more than 6,700 others didn't have the disorder. All of the children were lying in an MRI machine, with their eyes open, as an image was taken of their brain.

Among children with ADHD, researchers found the frontal cortex of their brains, the area that controls attention and manages unwanted behaviors, had increased wiring linked to structures centered deeper in the brain, that deal with information processing. This part of the brain is where learning happens. It's also where a person creates movement and experiences emotion. The children with ADHD had more connections between these two parts of their brains, but that didn't mean signals arrived more easily. Instead, the hyperconnected wiring led to what the study called "altered connectivity."

Norman, the NIH researcher, said the images build on earlier research. For example, when children with ADHD play games that require attention and controlling impulses, their brain scans showed they had difficulty making neural connections to perform the tasks. The study seems to affirm the same results, even when a person is resting.

The findings capture only a small portion of brain activity for people with ADHD. More research is needed looking at children with ADHD doing different activities, and at children with the disorder as they get older, Norman said. The study does not reflect children across the U.S. population, researchers noted. More than 15% of children with ADHD in the study came from households with incomes over $200,000, and about two-thirds of those with ADHD diagnoses were boys.

Sarah Karalunas, an associate professor of psychology at Purdue University , said the study helps establish a pattern of brain differences for children with ADHD who may be working harder than their peers to control their emotions and attention.

For his next study, Norman plans to look at how children practice skills that use these brain connections. The goal, he said, is to bring work toward finding treatments to change how brains function.

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Home » Health Conditions » ADHD & Life Insurance

ADHD & Life Insurance

When you are applying for life insurance in the UK, having ADHD can come up in the questions. This is usually in the questions about if you have ever seen a psychiatrist and any regular medication that you are taking.

To get things started we will ask you:

  • When were you diagnosed with ADHD?
  • Are you taking any medication or undergoing any treatment for ADHD?
  • Does ADHD affect your ability to work?
  • Have you completed all ADHD health investigations?

When looking into life insurance for someone living with ADHD, you may be able to find a policy that is offered at standard terms. This means that there will likely not be any exclusions or any premium increases.

This does depend on any medication or treatments that you are currently taking and/or undergoing. The terms of the policy will also depend on how much ADHD affects your day-to-day ability to do things. 

I know many people who are attempting to get an assessment for ADHD as an adult, after realising that they have symptoms and seeking support. Having an outstanding ADHD assessment can affect the life insurance options that you can access and we can help you to understand what this means for your insurance plans.

Our expert advisers are to make sure that your life insurance policy is placed with the best insurer for you.

ADHD & Critical Illness Cover

Critical illness cover pays out a cash lump sum of money, if you are diagnosed with a medical condition that is listed in the insurer’s claims set e.g. cancer, heart attack, stroke.

When looking critical illness cover options for people living with ADHD, you’ll probably discover that policies are generally offered at standard terms. However, the terms of the policy could be influenced by things such as the medications or treatments you are currently doing.

The impact of ADHD on your daily activities may also play a role in determining the terms of the policy. If you are able to live and work independently, it’s quite likely that you will be able to arrange critical illness cover at normal terms.

Our award winning advisers are here to make sure that you get the right insurer to match you and your health.

ADHD & Income Protection

Income protection pays you a replacement of your monthly income, if you are unable to work due to ill health.

It is possible to get income protection if you are living with ADHD, although you may find that some insurers will have a mental health exclusion on the policy. This can be because many people with ADHD have experienced mental health symptoms, especially if it was not diagnosed until being an adult.

If there are any outstanding ADHD assessments, some insurers may choose to postpone your income protection application until all investigations are completed. Insurers tend to be cautious as some ADHD symptoms can sometimes be linked to other underlying health conditions, so they do like to check that other medical conditions have been ruled out.

Just as in any health situation involving outstanding tests, insurers try to ensure a thorough and accurate assessment is completed so that they can give you a comprehensive and fair coverage that suits your needs.

Our advisers are here to make sure that you get the best insurance policy to protect your income.

ADHD & Travel Insurance

Are you jetting off somewhere soon? It’s a good idea to take out some travel insurance with a specialist insurer who can help with your travel needs whilst being supportive of you having ADHD. You can find out more about getting a quote on our travel insurance page .

What is ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental condition where a person has a unique pattern of challenges and strengths. Individuals with ADHD often demonstrate heightened creativity, energy, and a remarkable ability to think outside the box. While they may face difficulties with attention, organisation, and impulse control, it’s important to recognise that ADHD is not just a collection of potential challenges but rather a diverse cognitive profile.

The symptoms of ADHD typically start early in life and may become more noticeable during important events in a child’s life, such as starting school. While most cases are identified before turning 12, there are situations where diagnosis happens later in childhood. Occasionally, ADHD goes unrecognised during childhood, and individuals may be diagnosed when they are adults.

While symptoms may ease with age, many adults diagnosed with ADHD in their younger years continue to face challenges. People with ADHD may also have to deal with additional issues such as sleep and anxiety disorders.

Also: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Linked with: Neurodiversity, mental health

Possible Effects on Lifestyle

Some of the symptoms people may experience living with ADHD:

  • Blurting out responses / interrupting others
  • Carelessness and lack of attention to detail
  • Difficulty keeping quiet
  • Forgetfulness
  • Mood swings
  • Poor organisational skills
  • Starting new tasks before finishing old ones
  • Taking risks in activities

Medications and Treatments

  • Atomoxetine
  • Dexamfetamine
  • Lisdexamfetamine
  • Methylphenidate

Further Reading and Research

  • NHS – ADHD
  • ADHD Adult UK

By clicking on the link(s) above you will be departing from the regulatory site of Cura Financial Services. Cura Financial Services is not responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked site(s).

Common Questions

Hi, it’s great to hear from you. I’m glad that you have been able to get your diagnosis and support from your GP. It’s really tricky to say which is the best insurer. Most insurers in the UK are really good at offering life insurance to people living with ADHD.

The difference you can get is what the insurers ask for. Some will want to see a report from your GP to confirm your diagnosis, some may not. The amount of life insurance you need will also determine which insurer you use. Depending upon your age and how much life insurance you are applying for, some insurers might ask you to have a mini medical (they pay for it and do it at a time and place that suits you).

Let’s have a quick chat and I can go through the different options that you have.

Client Reviews

Cura Financial Services has been rated 5 out of 5 based on 767 reviews.

Review by Lauren on 24th January 2024

“ Excellent service - finally got cover sorted after years of being unable to obtain cover due to a vague diagnosis of a long term condition. ”  - 5      

You can read more of our reviews  here .

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ADHD & Life Insurance

Dr Kathryn Knowles Phd

Author This page was written by Dr Kathryn Knowles Phd, an award-winning insurance adviser. To read more about Kathryn please see her bio here

ADHD & Life Insurance

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Cura Financial Services Ltd is Registered in England and Wales, Number 8478749, The Evron Centre, John Street, Filey, North Yorkshire, YO14 9DW

travel insurance adhd

Administrator

I work within the admin team primarily contacting insurance companies for presales. From my background of working within the healthcare industry, I find this highly interesting with all the medical condition’s. In my free time I like curling up with a good book or baking my husband’s favourite chocolate brownies.

Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I used to do some modelling and took part in York Fashion Week.

travel insurance adhd

Head of Distribution

Hi I’m Austen, I live in Ainsdale with my partner Jane, and have two grown up children and a son who’s 12. I’ve worked in financial services for the past 25 years in a variety of roles. Having had personal experience of how a health condition can impact your life and financial situation, I truly understand the importance of having protection insurance in place.

I’m passionate about the work that Cura Financial Services does in enabling everyone to get the insurance that they need and their work across the industry for better access to insurance for all. At Cura I lead a team of expert protection insurance advisers to deliver a first-class customer experience.

Key Areas: Fun Fact: In my spare time I am a keen painter and in particular abstract art.

We always welcome the opportunity to speak with you, whether you have a general insurance query or need help finding the right policies for you.

You can call us on 0800 567 7450 or request a callback from ourselves.

travel insurance adhd

Finance Executive​

I have been with Cura since October 2018. In my role I handle company finances and liaise with insurers to monitor policy payments. I also deal with all areas of administration, speaking with clients, insurers and medical professionals. Outside of work I enjoy going to the gym (yes one of those people that actually enjoy going to the gym) going on long walks with my dog (more of a work out than going to the gym when you have a cheeky Jack Russell that doesn’t like doing as he is told) I also like socialising with friends whether that be a night in with a takeaway or a few beverages out.

Key Areas: Administration, Finance Fun Fact: I have 18 tattoos, and counting! Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Executive Assistant​

I joined Cura as an administration apprentice at the beginning of 2020. Joining the insurance industry was a massive change for me, as all previous employment and experiences have been either in the animal industry, or in customer facing roles. I now work as the executive assistance for Alan. I really enjoy my role, knowing that I can be a part of helping and supporting our client’s is very rewarding.

Qualifications: Level 2 Customer Service Practitioner Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I have a lizard (or dinosaur as they are referred to at home!)

travel insurance adhd

I joined he Cura team in November 2021. Before joining, I used to work in care and worked throughout the pandemic. My role as an administrator at Cura is looking after our new business. I am usually the one who calls GP surgeries, companies and regularly liaise with clients to keep them updated on their insurance journey. In my spare time I enjoy going out for a hack on my horse, walking my dog and going on cruises.

Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I used to work with over 20 St. Bernards and would get them ready to attend crufts, and no I didn’t do this in my bath tub at home.

A picture of Leanne smiling

High Net Worth Adviser

I joined Cura in October 2019, previously working in banking and then within retail sales and management. I have completed my training and really enjoy helping our clients, who often have more complex insurance needs. It’s such a reward to get them the insurances that they need. I spend my free time with family and enjoy taking my dog for long walks along Bridlington beach.

Qualifications: CII – Financial Protection Key Areas: Insurance Fun Fact: I love musicals (unfortunately for others, I enjoy singing along to them too!!)

travel insurance adhd

I joined the team in November 2021 after seven years working in banking. My job involves checking and sending clients’ policy documents and trust forms, handling claims when they first come in and all other administrative duties for our existing clients. When I’m not working, you will find me out walking by the sea or in the countryside; my current longest walk is 18 miles which I hope to beat this summer.

Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I trained as a tattooist for two years before swapping needles for numbers in banking.

travel insurance adhd

Protection Insurance Adviser​

I’ve been with Cura since 2016 and I thoroughly enjoy working here. My background is in Sport & Health Sciences, so the transition to the protection industry has been a real eye-opener for me; challenging but also very rewarding. When I’m away from the office, I enjoy catching up with my friends and family, and football is my passion!

Qualifications: BSc (Hons) Sports Coaching & Health Sciences. CII Financial Protection Key Areas: Kidney Conditions , Sickle Cell Anaemia Fun Fact: I’ve actually run the naked mile! Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Trainee Protection Insurance Adviser

I joined the Cura team in March 2019 having left a role working for a local authority. My experience in the insurance industry was incredibly limited, so I started working as an Administrator to build my knowledge and understanding. After recently being the Executive Assistant to Alan Knowles, I then moved onto a Paraplanning role and am now a Trainee Protection Insurance Adviser.

Outside of work I enjoy reading, writing and painting.

Qualifications: BA (Hons) Tourism & Business Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I’m the most boring person you will ever meet. Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

IFA Relationship Manager

Qualifications: CII Financial Protection Key Areas: Offshore Workers , Group Protection Fun Fact: You can’t beat a good zombie show and if there’s ever a zombie apocalypse, I’m your man.

travel insurance adhd

Client Relationship Adviser

I joined the team in October 2010 after a stint working for Saga. I was previously a trainee navigation officer in the merchant navy and have fond memories travelling the world in this role. I am a mum and love spending time with my daughter. It is interesting trying to fit some sort of personal life around work and mummy duties!

Qualifications: CII Financial Protection, Group Risk Key Areas: Armed Forces , Diabetes , HIV , Merchant Marine, Transgender , Women’s Health Fun Fact: I am seriously tall and have to buy all my trousers online. Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Kathryn Knowles

Managing Director​

“I am proud that we have built a company that insures the “uninsurable”, just by taking the extra time and care with each client to understand their needs and show them that there is insurance out there for them, whatever the circumstance.”

After completing my PhD in Business Management I joined the insurance industry in 2010. A big part of my work involves producing educational videos and blogs for charities and the general public, to improve access to insurance. I have three boys and they definitely keep me on my toes! I love to dance and be outdoors playing in the mud with my kids.

Qualifications: PhD Business Management. CII Financial Protection, Group Risk, Customer Service in Insurance. London Institute of Banking and Finance Certificate in Protection. LIBF CertPro. Financial services, regulation and ethics.

Key Areas:  Protection Insurance, Group Insurance,  Mental Health , Content Marketing, Social Media, Training

Fun Fact:  I may have a PhD, but push pull doors absolutely floor me, I always do the wrong way!

Links:   More About me

travel insurance adhd

Protection Insurance Adviser

I joined Cura in July 2021, previously working in banking and then within commercial insurance. I am still going studying and training but really enjoying helping our clients, who often have more complex insurance needs. It’s such a reward to get them the insurance that they need. I spend my free time with my wife and two rabbits, traveling and watching F1.

Qualifications: LIBF CertPro Key Areas: Insurance Fun Fact: Although I love to boast about getting my black belt in Karate (12 years ago) I’d probably struggle to kick higher than 3 feet today!

travel insurance adhd

Administrative Manager​​

I have worked for Cura since 2010. I started within the Administrative team and after a while decided to further my career by becoming an Insurance Adviser. I have now been the Administrative Manager for over 3 years and use my knowledge from working as an adviser, to enable our administrative team to support advisers and our clients. I have two little girls and I love to share my passion for baking with them. I often bring in my sweet treats for the office and use them as guinea pigs for new recipes.

Qualifications: National Diploma in Uniformed Public Service Level 3. CII Financial Protection Key Areas: Administration, Systems Management, Training, Trusts, Claims Fun Fact: I have been PADI qualified since age 11 and have swum with sharks. Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Protection Insurance Adviser​​​

With previous experience in general insurance I joined Cura in October 2020 to help broaden my knowledge and try something new. I enjoy advising clients on their protection needs and find it rewarding finding them cover. Away from the office I enjoy time with my family, long walks and a cheeky gin with my friends.

Qualifications: Currently studying for a degree in business management with the open university, LIBF CertPro Key Areas: Insurance Fun Fact: I enjoy dancing, I have competed and performed from a young age

travel insurance adhd

I joined Cura in July 2021 as I was looking for a change of direction in my career and this has been a great opportunity, especially considering I am also gaining qualifications alongside the job itself which I am currently studying through the London Institute of Banking and Finance. I have recently started advising my own clients which has been exciting!

Qualifications: National Diploma in Uniformed Public Service Level 3 Key Areas: Insurance Fun Fact:  I have pet rats (they’re actually extremely intelligent, loving and hygienic creatures, contrary to many people’s beliefs!)

Meet The Team - Tom.jpg

IT Development Officer ​

I have worked with Cura for many years and joined the team fully in 2020. I think I’m best known in the team for saying ‘Have you tried turning it off and turning it back on again?!’ I live in Sheffield with my partner and our two young children.

Key Areas: Database Management, Website Development, System Administration Fun Fact: In college I created a multi user network chat program in Microsoft Excel so me and my friends could chat when in different rooms

travel insurance adhd

Alan Knowles

“I am proud to be a part of Cura Financial Services, working alongside the insurance advisers who work tirelessly to source the best insurance policies for our clients.”

I originally joined financial services as a web programmer at the age of 21 but was quickly tempted by financial services and became a protection adviser. I now run Cura, a multi award-winning protection intermediary, specialising in hard-to-place protection cases, such as people with health conditions. I dislike excessive red tape and have a passion making the insurance industry more inclusive and accessible for everyone.

Qualifications: Bsc Hons Computer Programming. CII Financial Protection, Group Risk. London Institute of Banking and Finance Certificate in Protection. LIBF CertPro.

Key Areas:  Protection Insurance, Group Insurance,  Cancer ,  Heart Conditions ,  Foreign Travel

Fun Fact:  At college I was nearly 20 stone, had bright green hair (which I sometimes wore in big spikes), and wore a dog chain as a ‘fashion’ accessory.

travel insurance adhd

Compliance Officer

I am a Compliance Officer and have been with Cura since early 2017. I help the advisers coordinate their busy schedules inside of Cura and across the insurance industry, and ensure that their clients get an expert service.

Qualifications: Studying for a degree in business management Key Areas: Administration, Compliance Fun Fact: I can knit the most amazing blankets.

travel insurance adhd

Third Director of Cura and Chief Cuteness Operative

I joined Cura in June 2021, providing absolute joy and 100% cuteness to the Cura team.

Qualifications: Highly trained if fish skin and mackerel is on offer! Key Areas: Making my presence known on the Practical Protection Podcast Fun Fact: I particularly enjoy stealing my Mum’s (Kathryn Knowles) stationary when she’s not looking!

travel insurance adhd

Administrator​

I joined Cura in September 2020 after completing my Masters degree. I thoroughly enjoy being part of the administration team and learning more about the insurance industry. Outside of work I enjoy taking long walks on Filey beach and spending time with my family.

Qualifications: MA Education Key Areas: Administration Fun Fact: I travelled around Italy and Spain for 2 years whilst teaching English as a second language.

travel insurance adhd

I have worked in the financial services industry for over 14 years and joined the team in 2011. Having previously worked at Yorkshire Bank, I came to Cura to further my ability to secure people’s future financial security. I advise in protection and general insurance and have a keen interest in the benefit of income protection. Outside of work I enjoy playing tennis and hockey.

Qualifications: BSc (Hons) Economics. IFS Financial Advice, Mortgage Advice and Practice. CII Financial Protection. Key Areas: Accident, Sickness and Unemployment Cover Fun Fact: I don’t have any. Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Marketing Executive​

I joined Cura in 2019, after completing my degree. I didn’t think of insurance as a potential career for me, but I really enjoy being a part of the work that we do. I love to travel and am always planning my next holiday.

Qualifications: BA (Hons) in Tourism Management and Marketing Key Areas: Administration, Social Media Analysis, Website Management Fun Fact: *to follow* Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

I joined Cura as Marketing Executive in July 2019. I bring over 10 years of Design & Marketing experience to the team. I co-ordinate and design marketing material, as well as getting everyone involved in various charity events throughout the year! Which is lot’s of fun!

I enjoy keeping fit & active, Zumba and running. Going for walks with my husband and 2 kids in the beautiful North Yorkshire surroundings. I do love a good charity shop or car boot find!

Qualifications: BA (Hons) Visual Communication, Edinburgh College of Art Key Areas: Design, Copywriting, Marketing, Branding & Identity Fun Fact: I can play the flute & saxophone. Links: Linkedin

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travel insurance adhd

Insurance Adviser

I have been lucky enough to work at Cura since 2016. I initially started as an apprentice and spent a couple of years building my knowledge of what our clients need, so that I can support them as best as possible. I am now the Executive Assistant to the Head of Protection. I really enjoy my role as none of our clients are ever the same. Outside of work I enjoy horse riding, spending time with my family and a having good night out! I am rather partial to hosting sing-offs with Victoria in the office.

Qualifications: Level 3 Diploma in Business Administration Key Areas: Insurance Fun Fact: I am the songbird of my generation. Links: Linkedin

travel insurance adhd

Compliance Officer​​

My main role in Cura is compliance monitoring, alongside my training in HR, to support the whole team. I have worked here since November 2016, and have enjoyed the ability to put my HR knowledge into practice, as well as developing my skills in compliance. I work here part-time and I also teach English as a second language; languages are a love of mine. Outside of work, I love spending time with my family, and trying to watch my favourite Netflix series’, although it’s difficult to do with two young kids at my feet!

Qualifications: BA (Hons) German Studies, MA (CIPD) Personnel and Employee Development Key Areas: Compliance, Human Resources, Management Reporting, Outreach Activities, Training Fun Fact: I once went for an interview for a HR position, that took place in a bedroom!! Links: Linkedin

8 travel insurance mistakes to avoid before your next cruise

Michelle Couch-Friedman

The potential for unexpected and disruptive mishaps during your cruise is not something to ignore. Flight delays can lead to missed embarkations . A sudden medical emergency can result in passengers getting abandoned during port stops. Cruise lines can go bankrupt and strand travelers abroad.

As a consumer advocate, I receive hundreds of help requests each year from distraught cruisers whose trips didn't go as planned. Each time, I'm struck by how different their situation might have been if they'd only purchased an insurance policy. Cruise travel insurance can often save the day if you get hit by a surprise calamity before or during your cruise.

For cruise news, reviews and tips, sign up for TPG's cruise newsletter .

Of course, though, that's only true if you have a policy with the correct type of insurance coverage. Travel insurance mistakes and misunderstandings are common among cruise ship passengers and can lead to travelers finding themselves uninsured or under-insured when they encounter a problem on their trip.

That's something TPG wants to help you avoid. Here are the most common cruise travel insurance mistakes I've encountered so you will know how to make better choices for your next vacation at sea.

Not buying travel insurance because you expect to take the cruise

travel insurance adhd

Not even considering travel insurance is by far the top mistake I see made by cruise ship passengers. I'm always surprised when a cruiser tells me they didn't buy travel insurance because they didn't expect to cancel their trip.

This is a common defense offered by travelers caught in expensive situations that travel insurance would have easily covered.

The idea that you don't need travel insurance because you don't expect to cancel your cruise is flawed at its most basic level. The fact is, travel insurance is meant to protect you from unexpected events that cause you to cancel or interrupt your cruise.

Before you reject the idea of travel insurance to protect your next cruise, consider what will happen if:

  • You get sick or injured before or during the trip.
  • You lose your job and can't afford to go.
  • You or a family member is hospitalized or dies.
  • Your flight is canceled or delayed and you miss embarkation.
  • The airline loses your bags on the way to the cruise ship.

That's just a sampling of surprise events that comprehensive travel insurance could cover (depending on the policy). However, if you don't have a policy protecting you and you're in your cruise contract's penalty zone, you will miss your vacation and won't get your money back.

Related: Is travel insurance worth it?

Not budgeting for travel insurance

Another frequent excuse I hear from cruise ship passengers about why they didn't purchase travel insurance is the cost. That can be a short-sighted decision, though; if something goes wrong, an uninsured traveler can end up owing far more than the price of a comprehensive travel insurance policy.

Consider what would happen if you had an accident during a shore excursion and needed to be medically evacuated. Those emergency services can easily cost $50,000 or more, depending on your location. During a recent cruise to Antarctica, I was required by Aurora Expeditions to have $250,000 of medical evacuation insurance. Traveling to remote locations — or even not-so-remote locations — without medical evacuation coverage could be life-altering if you end up in a catastrophic emergency.

If you intend to spend thousands of dollars to take a cruise, it's always a good idea to budget some of your vacation funds for a travel insurance policy that minimally covers medical care and evacuation home. If you don't, you leave yourself wide open to medical bills, cancellation penalties and more.

Related: Should you get travel insurance if you have credit card protection?

Buying travel 'protection' from your tour operator

travel insurance adhd

A handful of tour operators and cruise lines sell something called "Travel Protection" or "Travel Waiver," which a sales rep will offer to you when you purchase your cruise. If you're booking online, a pop-up will appear before you complete your reservation. It will say something like "Warning! Protect your investment with our Travel Protection Plan" or "Get peace of mind with Travel Protection."

This product isn't called travel insurance because it isn't travel insurance — it's a hybrid product.

The travel insurance industry is highly regulated. If you buy a policy through an actual travel insurance company, you will be protected by specific laws and regulations. If you have a complaint about your travel insurance policy or claim, you can escalate your problem to your state's insurance board .

Most importantly, travel insurance companies have underwriters, so consumers have a safety net if something goes catastrophically wrong with the travel insurance company.

If you purchase travel protection instead, many safety protocols meant to protect consumers who buy travel insurance will not apply to you.

Before buying one of these policies, it's critical to understand what you're purchasing. Travel Protection has two parts:

Part A: This is predeparture cancellation protection (the passenger's cancellation) and is a self-insured product provided entirely by the cruise line or tour operator. There is no underwriter. This is often advertised as a "cancel for any reason" policy, but that moniker is often misunderstood by the travelers who buy this product. I'll explain further below.

Part B: This is post-departure protection and will be an actual travel insurance policy provided by a third-party insurance company. That part of the plan will provide medical coverage, emergency evacuation protection, trip interruption and more.

Because Part A is not a travel insurance product, passengers are putting their "investment" in a precarious situation should the cruise line or tour operator go out of business or become insolvent. If the operator has no money to pay the claims, there is no safety net without an underwriter. Thus, the customers will be left empty-handed.

That's the unfortunate situation that many Vantage Deluxe World Travel customers found themselves in last June. When the tour operator canceled all future tours and filed for bankruptcy , it owed $108 million to roughly 10,000 customers. Many of those would-be travelers had approved Part A (predeparture) Vantage Travel Protection claims and were waiting for payment when the company went belly-up.

Other Vantage customers erroneously believed that Part B of the pricey travel protection plan would protect them under all circumstances — including bankruptcy.

Far too late, these stunned travelers read through their policies and discovered the truth about that expensive protection: It was worthless if the company had no money to pay its bills, and neither part of the plan had an insolvency or bankruptcy clause.

Of course, that is an extreme case. A typical cruise ship passenger is much more likely to encounter a less dramatic issue with this type of travel protection, usually regarding "cancel for any reason" coverage .

Travel protection policies are often advertised as having "cancel for any reason" coverage, but the fine print reveals that only a few specific circumstances allow a traveler to cancel and receive a cash refund. For anything not listed as a legitimate reason to cancel for a monetary payment, the cruiser will receive a future travel voucher.

If you choose to buy a travel protection product instead of a travel insurance policy, make absolutely certain you read through the entire document and understand what you're buying.

Related: The 5 best cruise travel insurance plans

Assuming your health insurance will cover you on the ship

travel insurance adhd

Hopefully, you'll never discover through experience that shipboard medical care can come at an astronomical cost. Many cruise passengers have learned this lesson only after falling ill during their trip. But the worst news comes after the bill arrives: Most domestic health insurance plans — including basic Medicare — do not provide international coverage.

That means as soon as your cruise ship sails into international waters, you're medically uninsured. Any healthcare bills you accrue during your trip will be your responsibility.

It's not hard to imagine just how expensive and devastating it could be for an uninsured cruiser who becomes sick or injured on vacation. To make matters worse, cruise lines and foreign hospitals expect payment at the time services are rendered. No matter the circumstances, you'll be expected to pay immediately.

And I do mean no matter what the circumstances. A widow once contacted me soon after her husband had suddenly died aboard Holland America 's Eurodam.

The shock of losing her spouse was made even worse by what she viewed as the callous attitude of the crew member who handed her a bill for her husband's failed treatment — and expected her to pay before she was disembarked at the next port of call.

Unfortunately, that couple had assumed their Medicare plan was protecting them during their Caribbean cruise. It wasn't. (Note: There are supplementary Medigap plans that can provide international health care benefits for Medicare beneficiaries. These policies come at an additional cost and have coverage limitations and caps. Before using one, travelers should review all the details of the plan.)

While this woman's situation was extreme, accidents and illnesses happen all the time on fun-filled cruises. You don't want a lack of insurance to make those events more catastrophic than they are.

A comprehensive travel insurance policy can provide not only healthcare coverage abroad but also medical evacuation and repatriation — services that can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars.

Related: What happens if you get sick on a cruise?

Not reading and understanding the travel insurance policy

Travel insurance policies are many pages long and often contain confusing terms. Many travelers buy policies that seem acceptable, and they gloss over the details. However, if you don't review and understand the travel insurance policy you've purchased, that mistake can have giant repercussions.

A one-size-fits-all travel insurance policy does not exist. The choices of travel insurance products available for cruise ship passengers are extensive, with options from basic to full coverage.

To know exactly which protections you've purchased, you must thoroughly read all the details of your plan. Each policy will have a list of named perils. If something on that list causes the cancellation or interruption of your trip, you can claim coverage. If the circumstances you're facing are not on that list, you're out of luck.

Not only should you pay attention to the named covered events, but equally important are the exclusions — conditions that can invalidate your policy. For instance, if you're planning on zip lining, bungee jumping, rock climbing or participating in any other extreme adventure, you'll want to make sure your policy doesn't exclude risky activities.

The travel insurance industry provides a generous lookover period, usually 10 to 15 days after purchase. Always use that two-week window to carefully review your policy. Do not skim over details you don't understand and hope for the best. If you need help understanding the fine print, contact the travel insurance company for clarification.

If you determine during that time that the policy doesn't provide the coverage you want and need, you can request a refund and continue your search. After that lookover period, your travel insurance policy is neither refundable nor changeable.

Related: The best travel insurance policies and providers

Waiting too long to purchase travel insurance for the cruise

travel insurance adhd

A common mistake some cruise ship passengers make is waiting too long to buy travel insurance.

The general rule of thumb is that if you intend to insure your trip, you should purchase that protection at the same time you start to make prepaid, nonrefundable reservations. That includes airfare, excursions, pre- or post-cruise hotels and anything else for which you will not receive a refund if you need to cancel the trip.

Travel insurance coverage typically begins to protect you the day after you purchase the policy. So, at any time after that, if a covered event happens to you and causes you to cancel your trip, you'll be protected from financial penalties. Of course, if you wait too long to purchase your travel insurance for your cruise and an unexpected event occurs, you won't be able to buy a retroactive policy.

If you enter the cancellation penalty phase of your cruise contract, you've waited too long to buy travel insurance. In fact, some companies won't allow you to purchase travel insurance after that date.

Not disclosing a preexisting condition

Not disclosing a preexisting condition is a travel insurance mistake that can have devastating consequences. Although buying a policy that covers a preexisting condition is possible, it's a bit more complicated.

Cruise ship passengers with preexisting conditions should be aware that their window to purchase travel insurance is abbreviated. Most travel insurance companies require travelers with preexisting conditions to purchase travel insurance within 14 to 21 days after making their initial trip deposit.

If you've been diagnosed with any medical problems in the 12 months preceding your trip or have a persistent condition, you must be certain to:

  • Buy a policy that specifically names coverage for preexisting conditions.
  • Make your travel insurance purchase within the first 14 to 21 days after putting a deposit down on your trip.

Cruisers who file a travel insurance claim for a medical problem related to a preexisting condition will be at great risk of having that claim rejected.

Underinsuring the cost of the entire cruise package

travel insurance adhd

Travel insurance can significantly increase the cost of your cruise vacation. Prices vary based on the level of protection you choose, the age of all travelers on the policy, the length of the trip and the state where you live. If you wish to be fully protected, it's critical not to undervalue your trip.

If you lowball the cost of your cruise and something goes wrong, your claim will only be paid based on the value of what you insured. Passengers who have purchased an annual insurance plan should pay careful attention to the limits on their policy. It can be easy to accidentally underinsure your cruise if you're relying on an annual travel insurance policy with a per-trip or per-year cap.

Cruise ship passengers should always insure every nonrefundable, prepaid part of their itinerary. That includes the cruise, airfare, hotels and third-party excursions.

Bottom line

Cruise travel insurance can provide peace of mind and protection from the repercussions of unexpected events that could ruin your vacation and wreck your wallet.

Purchasing travel insurance does not have to be a chore. Follow these easy steps for success:

  • Use a website like InsureMyTrip or Squaremouth to compare various policies and cruise travel insurance providers.
  • Read your policy and ensure you understand what's covered and how to file a claim if needed.
  • Carry a copy of your travel insurance card during your cruise, which will have a toll-free number if you need help.
  • Enjoy your cruise.

If you have a problem with a travel insurance company, cruise line, airline, car rental agency or hotel, send your request for help to [email protected] , and I'll be happy to investigate.

Planning a cruise? Start with these stories:

  • The 5 most desirable cabin locations on any cruise ship
  • A beginners guide to picking a cruise line
  • The 8 worst cabin locations on any cruise ship
  • The ultimate guide to what to pack for a cruise
  • A quick guide to the most popular cruise lines
  • 21 tips and tricks that will make your cruise go smoothly
  • Top ways cruisers waste money
  • The ultimate guide to choosing a cruise ship cabin

FinanceBuzz

FinanceBuzz

8 Reasons It’s Worth It To Buy Travel Insurance (And 6 Times To Skip It)

Posted: July 12, 2023 | Last updated: April 7, 2024

<p> Life is full of unexpected events and complications, and that doesn’t stop just because you’re traveling. If anything, travel may have even more surprises than your day-to-day life at home.  </p> <p> Travel insurance can help you <a href="https://financebuzz.com/seniors-throw-money-away-tp?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=1&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=avoid+wasting+money&synd_backlink_position=1&synd_slug=seniors-throw-money-away-tp">avoid wasting money</a> if you have to cancel a trip due to illness, need medical coverage while you’re traveling, or send you home for medical reasons.  </p> <p> However, it may not always be necessary and can sometimes be a waste of money. Keep reading to learn when you should and shouldn’t opt for travel insurance.</p><p>  <a href="https://financebuzz.com/top-travel-credit-cards?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=1&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=Compare+the+best+travel+credit+cards+for+nearly+free+travel&synd_backlink_position=2&synd_slug=top-travel-credit-cards">Compare the best travel credit cards for nearly free travel</a>  </p>

Life is full of unexpected events and complications, and that doesn’t stop just because you’re traveling. If anything, travel may have even more surprises than your day-to-day life at home.

Travel insurance can help you avoid wasting money if you have to cancel a trip due to illness, need medical coverage while you’re traveling, or send you home for medical reasons.

However, it may not always be necessary and can sometimes be a waste of money. Keep reading to learn when you should and shouldn’t opt for travel insurance.

Compare the best travel credit cards for nearly free travel

<p> The number one reason people buy travel insurance is to cover an expensive trip. And if you’re traveling overseas, chances are your travels will cost a lot of money.  </p> <p> In addition, there are potential complications when it comes to international travel, from losing luggage during connecting flights, missed or canceled flights, sickness, and more.  </p> <p> And if something catastrophic happens in a foreign country, travel insurance provides evacuation so you can get home safely.</p><p>  <p class=""><b>Want to learn how to build wealth like the 1%?</b> <a href="https://financebuzz.com/worthy-community-signup-wealth-testimonials-v2-synd?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=2&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=Sign+up+for+Worthy+to+get+ideas+and+advice+delivered+to+your+inbox.&synd_backlink_position=3&synd_slug=worthy-community-signup-wealth-testimonials-v2-synd">Sign up for Worthy to get ideas and advice delivered to your inbox.</a></p>  </p>

Safety net for international travel

The number one reason people buy travel insurance is to cover an expensive trip. And if you’re traveling overseas, chances are your travels will cost a lot of money.

In addition, there are potential complications when it comes to international travel, from losing luggage during connecting flights, missed or canceled flights, sickness, and more.

And if something catastrophic happens in a foreign country, travel insurance provides evacuation so you can get home safely.

Want to learn how to build wealth like the 1%? Sign up for Worthy to get ideas and advice delivered to your inbox.

<p> Getting sick or injured is unpleasant enough when you’re in the comfort of your home, but it’s a new beast entirely when you’re abroad.  </p> <p> Generally, you can expect basic medical expenses to be covered through your travel plan, often including dental. Medicare will not cover medical expenses in a foreign country. If you’re traveling overseas, travel insurance for potential medical costs is worthwhile. </p>

Medical coverage

Getting sick or injured is unpleasant enough when you’re in the comfort of your home, but it’s a new beast entirely when you’re abroad.

Generally, you can expect basic medical expenses to be covered through your travel plan, often including dental. Medicare will not cover medical expenses in a foreign country. If you’re traveling overseas, travel insurance for potential medical costs is worthwhile.

<p> Renting a car is a great way to get around when traveling because you can explore a place on your own. Using taxis or ride-share services may cost more money. However, even the best drivers make mistakes, and no one can protect themselves from reckless drivers.  </p> <p> Your U.S. car insurance won’t cover you when driving in a foreign country. So choosing the car-rental insurance option when you buy travel insurance may be a good move.  </p> <p> Be aware that most travel insurance rental-car plans cover collisions and may not cover medical expenses, damages to other cars or property, or personal property damage or loss.</p><p>  <p><a href="https://financebuzz.com/southwest-booking-secrets-55mp?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=4&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=7+Nearly+Secret+Things+to+Do+If+You+Fly+Southwest&synd_backlink_position=4&synd_slug=southwest-booking-secrets-55mp">7 Nearly Secret Things to Do If You Fly Southwest</a></p>  </p>

Cover rental car mishaps

Renting a car is a great way to get around when traveling because you can explore a place on your own. Using taxis or ride-share services may cost more money. However, even the best drivers make mistakes, and no one can protect themselves from reckless drivers.

Your U.S. car insurance won’t cover you when driving in a foreign country. So choosing the car-rental insurance option when you buy travel insurance may be a good move.

Be aware that most travel insurance rental-car plans cover collisions and may not cover medical expenses, damages to other cars or property, or personal property damage or loss.

7 Nearly Secret Things to Do If You Fly Southwest

<p> Unfortunately, as with many health insurance plans, travel insurance often won’t cover pre-existing conditions. Travel health insurance is usually meant for unforeseen illnesses or injuries instead of complications due to an existing medical issue.  </p> <p> Even travel insurance companies that cover pre-existing issues often only cover physical maladies and exclude mental conditions and typical pregnancy-related symptoms and complications.  </p>

Pre-existing conditions often aren’t covered

Unfortunately, as with many health insurance plans, travel insurance often won’t cover pre-existing conditions. Travel health insurance is usually meant for unforeseen illnesses or injuries instead of complications due to an existing medical issue.

Even travel insurance companies that cover pre-existing issues often only cover physical maladies and exclude mental conditions and typical pregnancy-related symptoms and complications.

<p> A big fear for travelers is losing their luggage, either having it not arrive at the destination or stolen during their trip. Most airlines will offer reimbursement for luggage they lose, but it can take quite a while for this to process. </p> <p> Travel insurance will cover the cost of replacing your clothing and other items while you wait for your luggage to be located and can also cover theft and damage. </p>

Protect lost luggage

A big fear for travelers is losing their luggage, either having it not arrive at the destination or stolen during their trip. Most airlines will offer reimbursement for luggage they lose, but it can take quite a while for this to process.

Travel insurance will cover the cost of replacing your clothing and other items while you wait for your luggage to be located and can also cover theft and damage.

<p>You should consider buying travel insurance if you’re traveling with valuables, including expensive jewelry, art, or even pricey sporting or adventure gear. </p> <p> You’ll need to talk to the insurance agency specifically about covering your valuables, as they may need to be insured separately. Depending on your homeowners insurance policy, your jewelry may be covered even when you travel.  </p> <p> Sporting goods, including golf clubs, will not be covered by your homeowners insurance if you’re traveling, so you will need travel insurance to replace them if they’re lost, damaged, or stolen.</p><p>  <p class=""><a href="https://financebuzz.com/top-no-interest-credit-cards?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=7&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=Pay+no+interest+until+nearly+2025+with+these+credit+cards&synd_backlink_position=5&synd_slug=top-no-interest-credit-cards">Pay no interest until nearly 2025 with these credit cards</a></p>  </p>

Cover valuable items and gear

You should consider buying travel insurance if you’re traveling with valuables, including expensive jewelry, art, or even pricey sporting or adventure gear.

You’ll need to talk to the insurance agency specifically about covering your valuables, as they may need to be insured separately. Depending on your homeowners insurance policy, your jewelry may be covered even when you travel.

Sporting goods, including golf clubs, will not be covered by your homeowners insurance if you’re traveling, so you will need travel insurance to replace them if they’re lost, damaged, or stolen.

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<p> While we do our best to prepare for the worst-case scenario, we can’t stop life from happening. Things like medical emergencies, a death in the family, or other catastrophes can halt your travel plans.  </p> <p> If you have travel insurance, rescheduling or cancellation fees will be covered, allowing you to deal with the emergency at your own pace. You won’t have to worry about losing the money spent on the trip and subsequent fees. </p>

Emergencies happen

While we do our best to prepare for the worst-case scenario, we can’t stop life from happening. Things like medical emergencies, a death in the family, or other catastrophes can halt your travel plans.

If you have travel insurance, rescheduling or cancellation fees will be covered, allowing you to deal with the emergency at your own pace. You won’t have to worry about losing the money spent on the trip and subsequent fees.

<p> Are you planning a fall trip to the Gulf Coast or Florida? Consider your travel destination and the time of year you're going.  </p> <p> If you’re visiting someplace prone to natural disasters, especially seasonal occurrences like tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires, and such, travel insurance can help you recoup your money should these events interrupt your travel plans. </p> <p> Similarly, if a natural disaster occurs during your trip, often, insurance will pay to move you to a more secure location. </p>

Natural disaster coverage

Are you planning a fall trip to the Gulf Coast or Florida? Consider your travel destination and the time of year you're going.

If you’re visiting someplace prone to natural disasters, especially seasonal occurrences like tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires, and such, travel insurance can help you recoup your money should these events interrupt your travel plans.

Similarly, if a natural disaster occurs during your trip, often, insurance will pay to move you to a more secure location.

<p>Your insurance will most likely cover typical travel-related injuries but don't expect your medical bills to be covered if your itinerary involves extreme adventures or dangerous exploits. </p> <p> Surfing, sailing, kayaking, bungee jumping, scuba diving, skiing, snowboarding, and other extreme sports do not fall into everyday illnesses or injuries. For these activities, consider getting a specific plan for adventure activities.</p><p>  <p class=""><a href="https://financebuzz.com/top-cash-back-credit-cards?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=10&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=Earn+up+to+5%25+cash+back+when+you+shop+with+these+leading+credit+cards&synd_backlink_position=6&synd_slug=top-cash-back-credit-cards">Earn up to 5% cash back when you shop with these leading credit cards</a></p>  </p>

Extreme adventures may not be covered

Your insurance will most likely cover typical travel-related injuries but don't expect your medical bills to be covered if your itinerary involves extreme adventures or dangerous exploits.

Surfing, sailing, kayaking, bungee jumping, scuba diving, skiing, snowboarding, and other extreme sports do not fall into everyday illnesses or injuries. For these activities, consider getting a specific plan for adventure activities.

Earn up to 5% cash back when you shop with these leading credit cards

<p> If you booked your trip through a travel company and it goes bankrupt, travel insurance may provide a safety net to ensure you get your money back. </p> <p> Airlines, cruise ships, travel companies, and other travel-related businesses suffered during the pandemic, and many may not be on solid financial ground yet. </p> <p> This may not be covered in a basic insurance plan, so make sure your agent adds financial default coverage if you are concerned about the health of your travel provider. </p><p>In the situation any company or organization closes or is otherwise inoperable during your trip, you’ll be covered. </p> <p> Now let’s look at times you may not need travel insurance. </p>

Shaky travel companies

If you booked your trip through a travel company and it goes bankrupt, travel insurance may provide a safety net to ensure you get your money back.

Airlines, cruise ships, travel companies, and other travel-related businesses suffered during the pandemic, and many may not be on solid financial ground yet.

This may not be covered in a basic insurance plan, so make sure your agent adds financial default coverage if you are concerned about the health of your travel provider. 

In the situation any company or organization closes or is otherwise inoperable during your trip, you’ll be covered.

Now let’s look at times you may not need travel insurance.

<p> Before purchasing travel insurance, consider which credit card you have. Many of the <a href="https://financebuzz.com/top-travel-credit-cards?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=12&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=top+credit+cards&synd_backlink_position=7&synd_slug=top-travel-credit-cards">top credit cards</a> offer travel protections.  </p> <p> Some protections you may already have include lost luggage, rental car insurance, trip delay, and trip interruption or cancellation.  </p> <p> Credit card programs often don’t cover medical or other interruptions, so consider your priorities before choosing this option. </p>

Your credit card offers travel protections

Before purchasing travel insurance, consider which credit card you have. Many of the top credit cards  offer travel protections.

Some protections you may already have include lost luggage, rental car insurance, trip delay, and trip interruption or cancellation.

Credit card programs often don’t cover medical or other interruptions, so consider your priorities before choosing this option.

<p> If you’re traveling within the U.S. and its territories, travel insurance may not be necessary. For example, you won’t need medical coverage as your health insurance should be honored nationwide.  </p> <p> Domestic travel is also usually much less expensive. If you’re taking a cheap, last-minute, or nonstop flight and staying at an inexpensive hotel or rental, the cost of travel insurance may not be worth it. </p> <p> One exception might be a family trip to Disney World. The estimate for a trip for a family of four in 2023 is more than $6,000, so travel insurance might be money well spent in this case.</p><p>  <p class=""><a href="https://financebuzz.com/top-signs-of-financial-fitness?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=13&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=5+Signs+You%E2%80%99re+Doing+Better+Financially+Than+the+Average+American&synd_backlink_position=8&synd_slug=top-signs-of-financial-fitness-2">5 Signs You’re Doing Better Financially Than the Average American</a></p>  </p>

You have a domestic trip

If you’re traveling within the U.S. and its territories, travel insurance may not be necessary. For example, you won’t need medical coverage as your health insurance should be honored nationwide.

Domestic travel is also usually much less expensive. If you’re taking a cheap, last-minute, or nonstop flight and staying at an inexpensive hotel or rental, the cost of travel insurance may not be worth it.

One exception might be a family trip to Disney World. The estimate for a trip for a family of four in 2023 is more than $6,000, so travel insurance might be money well spent in this case.

5 Signs You’re Doing Better Financially Than the Average American

<p> Not all travel is planned. Whether traveling for work, a family emergency, or just a last-minute vacation, you likely don’t need insurance in these circumstances. Odds are, you’re packing light, and both your flight and hotel are relatively inexpensive.  </p> <p> In these scenarios, the things insurance covers won’t be relevant, including baggage loss, flight cancellations, hotel issues, and so on. </p><p>Not only will these costs likely be minimal, but they can be disputed with your airline or hotel, although it may take a little while to get your money back. </p>

Don’t add expense to cheap trips

Not all travel is planned. Whether traveling for work, a family emergency, or just a last-minute vacation, you likely don’t need insurance in these circumstances. Odds are, you’re packing light, and both your flight and hotel are relatively inexpensive.

In these scenarios, the things insurance covers won’t be relevant, including baggage loss, flight cancellations, hotel issues, and so on. 

Not only will these costs likely be minimal, but they can be disputed with your airline or hotel, although it may take a little while to get your money back.

<p> If you’re buying travel insurance to cover the cost of rescheduling a flight, you’re better off purchasing a refundable ticket at a higher price. And some airlines have more flexible policies now. </p> <p> Many airlines allow last-minute ticket changes and will even help you reschedule your flight within a specific timeframe. The timeframe and policy vary by airline, and you may be subject to a nominal cancellation or rebooking fee, but it will be significantly less than insurance.  </p>

The airline has a flexible rebooking policy

If you’re buying travel insurance to cover the cost of rescheduling a flight, you’re better off purchasing a refundable ticket at a higher price. And some airlines have more flexible policies now.

Many airlines allow last-minute ticket changes and will even help you reschedule your flight within a specific timeframe. The timeframe and policy vary by airline, and you may be subject to a nominal cancellation or rebooking fee, but it will be significantly less than insurance.

<p> One emergency situation insurance probably won’t cover is war or political unrest. If you’re visiting a location with political tensions and your trip is canceled as a result, don’t expect your insurance to cover the costs.  </p> <p> Insurance companies generally follow the travel advisories the U.S. State Department issued for medical and political situations.  </p> <p> Similarly, insurance won't cover these costs if you have to leave your trip early for safety concerns. Consider your destination's political environment before booking your travel or buying insurance.</p><p>  <p class=""><a href="https://financebuzz.com/recession-coming-55mp?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=16&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=9+Things+You+Must+Do+Before+The+Next+Recession&synd_backlink_position=9&synd_slug=recession-coming-55mp">9 Things You Must Do Before The Next Recession</a></p>  </p>

Insurance will not cover political unrest

One emergency situation insurance probably won’t cover is war or political unrest. If you’re visiting a location with political tensions and your trip is canceled as a result, don’t expect your insurance to cover the costs.

Insurance companies generally follow the travel advisories the U.S. State Department issued for medical and political situations.

Similarly, insurance won't cover these costs if you have to leave your trip early for safety concerns. Consider your destination's political environment before booking your travel or buying insurance.

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<p> Many hotel cancellation policies have tiers depending on the booking you make. For example, some may have free cancellation within a specific period, while others charge different rates for rooms booked as non-refundable or partially refundable.  </p> <p> If your sole reason for purchasing insurance is hotel flexibility, consult with the hotel before you book. They may have a policy as flexible as your insurance or can work with you should something unexpected arise.  </p> <p> Penalty-free cancellations for major hotels tend to be around 24-48 hours prior to arrival. </p>

Your hotel may cover cancellations

Many hotel cancellation policies have tiers depending on the booking you make. For example, some may have free cancellation within a specific period, while others charge different rates for rooms booked as non-refundable or partially refundable.

If your sole reason for purchasing insurance is hotel flexibility, consult with the hotel before you book. They may have a policy as flexible as your insurance or can work with you should something unexpected arise.

Penalty-free cancellations for major hotels tend to be around 24-48 hours prior to arrival.

<p> Travel insurance may be pricey, but it’s a lifesaver in many situations. However, in others, it’s overkill and a waste of money.  </p> <p> Every travel situation is different, so consider your specific needs when purchasing. And, if you want more money to cover your insurance, consider these ways to <a href="https://financebuzz.com/ways-to-make-extra-money?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=18&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=make+extra+cash&synd_backlink_position=10&synd_slug=ways-to-make-extra-money">make extra cash</a> for travel funds.</p><p>  <p class=""><b>More from FinanceBuzz:</b></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.financebuzz.com/supplement-income-55mp?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=18&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=7+things+to+do+if+you%E2%80%99re+barely+scraping+by+financially.&synd_backlink_position=11&synd_slug=supplement-income-55mp">7 things to do if you’re barely scraping by financially.</a></li> <li><a href="https://financebuzz.com/ways-to-make-extra-money?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=18&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=12+legit+ways+to+earn+extra+cash.&synd_backlink_position=12&synd_slug=ways-to-make-extra-money">12 legit ways to earn extra cash.</a></li> <li><a href="https://r.financebuzz.com/aff_c?source=%2Fshould-you-buy-travel-insurance&offer_id=16866&aff_id=1006&aff_sub=msn&aff_sub2=&aff_sub3=&aff_sub4=feed&aff_sub5={impressionid}&aff_click_id=&aff_unique1={aff_unique1}&aff_unique2=&aff_unique3=&aff_unique4=&aff_unique5={aff_unique5}&rendered_slug=/should-you-buy-travel-insurance&contentblockid=984&contentblockversionid=16460&ml_sort_id=&sorted_item_id=&widget_type=&cms_offer_id=637&keywords=&synd_slide=18&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=Can+you+retire+early%3F+Take+this+quiz+and+find+out.&synd_backlink_position=13" rel="nofollow">Can you retire early? Take this quiz and find out.</a></li> <li><a href="https://financebuzz.com/extra-newsletter-signup-testimonials-synd?utm_source=msn&utm_medium=feed&synd_slide=18&synd_postid=12377&synd_backlink_title=9+simple+ways+to+make+up+to+an+extra+%24200%2Fday&synd_backlink_position=14&synd_slug=extra-newsletter-signup-testimonials-synd">9 simple ways to make up to an extra $200/day</a></li> </ul>  </p>

Bottom line

Travel insurance may be pricey, but it’s a lifesaver in many situations. However, in others, it’s overkill and a waste of money.

Every travel situation is different, so consider your specific needs when purchasing. And, if you want more money to cover your insurance, consider these ways to make extra cash for travel funds.

More from FinanceBuzz:

  • 7 things to do if you’re barely scraping by financially.
  • 12 legit ways to earn extra cash.
  • Can you retire early? Take this quiz and find out.
  • 9 simple ways to make up to an extra $200/day

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Introduction to American Express Travel Protection

Types of travel protection offered, american express travel protection: a guide to your benefits.

Affiliate links for the products on this page are from partners that compensate us and terms apply to offers listed (see our advertiser disclosure with our list of partners for more details). However, our opinions are our own. See how we rate credit cards to write unbiased product reviews .

The information for the following product(s) has been collected independently by Business Insider: Hilton Honors American Express Aspire Card, Amex EveryDay® Preferred Credit Card, American Express® Green Card, The Plum Card® from American Express. The details for these products have not been reviewed or provided by the issuer.

  • Some American Express cards offer trip cancellation and interruption benefits .
  • You'll find these perks on cards like The Platinum Card® from American Express.
  • If you're eager to sign up for a travel credit card with perks, compare each card's offerings.

Overview of Travel Protection Benefits

While credit card insurance and travel protection coverage are usually considered secondary to rewards programs and other cardholder perks, these benefits can be equally important if you travel.

When you pay for a trip with a credit card that offers trip cancellation and interruption insurance, for example, you can get reimbursed for some of your travel expenses in the event your vacation is halted for reasons beyond your control. Meanwhile, trip delay insurance lets you apply for some reimbursement when a delay of your trip results in surprise expenses, such as an unplanned hotel stay near the airport when your flight is on hold.

Importance of Travel Insurance

Chase credit cards like the Chase Sapphire Reserve® and Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card have really stood out for years in terms of the protections they offer, and with some of the highest limits out there. Still, American Express is still coming around — it recently added trip cancellation and interruption insurance, along with trip delay coverage, to many of its top rewards credit cards. 

If you're in the market for an American Express card and you're hoping to take advantage of important travel benefits, consider the cards below and their expanded travel protections.

Trip Cancellation and Interruption Insurance

New trip cancellation and interruption insurance from American Express credit cards will provide you with up to $10,000 in coverage (and up to $20,000 per account per year) you can use for reimbursement of prepaid travel expenses like airfare and hotels. This coverage can come in handy if your trip is canceled for a covered reason beyond your control, or you're stuck in your destination and require an extended stay and additional costs before you can return home.

Note that this coverage is good for round-trip travel booked with your credit card, meaning you have to pay for travel expenses with a common carrier with your American Express credit card in order to be eligible.

American Express cards that qualify for this coverage include:

  • The Platinum Card® from American Express
  • Delta SkyMiles® Reserve American Express Card
  • Hilton Honors American Express Aspire Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant® American Express® Card
  • The Business Platinum Card® from American Express
  • Delta SkyMiles® Reserve Business American Express Card

Other versions of the Amex Platinum card — including the Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and corporate flavors —  also offer this coverage, as do all versions of the Amex Centurion (black) card , which is invite-only.

Baggage Insurance Plan

Quite a few American Express credit cards also offer a baggage insurance plan, although this isn't a new or upgraded benefit from the card issuer. This coverage can come in handy if your luggage is lost or stolen during a covered trip. To be eligible for this coverage, you have to pay for travel with a common carrier (airfare, cruise fare, etc.) with your American Express credit card.

The amount of coverage you'll receive depends on the card you have. For example, baggage insurance from the The Platinum Card® from American Express offers up to $3,000 in coverage per person for carry-on luggage and up to $2,000 per person in coverage for some types of checked baggage.

With baggage insurance from the Amex EveryDay® Preferred Credit Card , on the other hand, you'll only qualify for up to $1,250 in coverage per person for carry-on luggage and up to $500 for covered checked baggage, although an extra benefit of $250 is offered for qualified "high risk items" like jewelry or sporting equipment. 

American Express cards that come with baggage insurance include:

  • The Platinum Card® from American Express (including various versions)
  • American Express® Gold Card (including various versions)
  • American Express® Green Card (including various versions)
  • Delta SkyMiles® Gold American Express Card
  • Delta SkyMiles® Platinum American Express Card
  • Hilton Honors American Express Surpass® Card
  • Amex EveryDay® Preferred Credit Card
  • The Plum Card® from American Express

American Express business cards with baggage insurance include:

  • American Express® Business Gold Card
  • The Blue Business® Plus Credit Card from American Express
  • Delta SkyMiles® Gold Business American Express Card
  • Delta SkyMiles® Platinum Business American Express Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy Business® American Express® Card
  • The Hilton Honors American Express Business Card
  • Lowe's Business Rewards Card from American Express
  • Amazon Business Prime American Express Card
  • Amazon Business American Express Card

Various versions of the Amex Centurion card and several Amex corporate cards also offer baggage insurance.

Travel Accident Insurance

Some American Express cards also offer secondary auto rental coverage, which means this coverage kicks in after other policies you have are exhausted, as opposed to primary car rental coverage.

While this benefit applies to many Amex cards, note that coverage limits can vary. With the Amex Gold card, for example, coverage is limited to $50,000 per rental agreement for damage or theft, yet the Amex Platinum card offers up to $75,000 in coverage. The insurance doesn't cover personal liability, either.

Also note that this coverage comes with a certain amount of Accidental Death or Dismemberment Coverage that varies by card. With , for example, you'll receive up to $200,000 in coverage per person and up to $300,000 in coverage per car accident for accidental death and dismemberment. Make sure to read your credit card's terms and conditions so you know exactly how much coverage you have. 

American Express cards that come with secondary auto rental coverage include:

  • The Platinum Card® from American Express (including various versions)
  • Delta SkyMiles® Blue American Express Card
  • Hilton Honors American Express Card
  • Marriott Bonvoy American Express® Card (no longer available to new applicants)
  • Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express
  • Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express
  • Amex Everyday® Credit Card from American Express

And business cards from Amex that offer secondary car rental insurance include:

While American Express did offer travel accident insurance on some of its cards, this coverage was effectively dropped as of January 1, 2020. The same is true for the American Express Roadside Assistance Hotline, which is no longer available.

Trip Delay Insurance

In January of 2020, American Express also rolled out an upgraded trip delay insurance benefit for many of its top rewards credit cards. While this perk may seem like an unusual one, there are so many scenarios where trip delay coverage could help you save money and avoid surprise expenses when travel is delayed beyond your control. 

With trip delay coverage from Amex, you can be reimbursed for up to $500 per trip for hotel stays, meals, and other miscellaneous required expenses when your flight or other trip plans are delayed by more than six hours. If you're sitting at the airport and your flight is suddenly delayed until the next morning, for example, you could use this coverage to get reimbursed for a nearby airport hotel and your dinner, then for an Uber or Lyft ride back to the airport.

To qualify for American Express trip delay coverage, you need to pay for your round-trip travel expenses with a common carrier with your credit card.

Amex cards that come with trip delay coverage include:

  • American Express® Gold Card
  • American Express® Green Card

Again, the various versions of the Amex Platinum and Amex Centurion cards also offer trip delay insurance.

Most travel protections are automatically activated when you use your American Express card to book your travel. However, specific activation steps, if any, depend on the benefit.

Covered reasons for trip cancellation or interruption typically include illness, severe weather, and other unforeseen events, reimbursing you for non-refundable travel expenses.

Yes, baggage insurance plans come with coverage limits, which vary depending on the card and the type of loss (e.g., lost, damaged, or stolen baggage).

The Global Assist Hotline offers medical, legal, and other emergency coordination and assistance services, but financial costs for services rendered are typically the cardholder's responsibility.

Eligibility for specific travel protections varies by card. Premium cards often offer more comprehensive protections compared to basic cards.

travel insurance adhd

For rates and fees of The Platinum Card® from American Express, please click here.

Eligibility and Benefit level varies by Card. Terms, Conditions and Limitations Apply. Please visit americanexpress.com/benefitsguide for more details. Trip Delay Insurance, Trip Cancellation and Interruption Insurance, and Cell Phone Protection Underwritten by New Hampshire Insurance Company, an AIG Company. Global Assist Hotline Card Members are responsible for the costs charged by third-party service providers. If approved and coordinated by Premium Global Assist Hotline, emergency medical transportation assistance may be provided at no cost. In any other circumstance, Card Members may be responsible for the costs charged by third-party service providers. Extended Warranty, Purchase Protection, and Baggage Insurance Plan Underwritten by AMEX Assurance Company. Car Rental Loss & Damage Insurance Underwritten by AMEX Assurance Company. Car Rental Loss or Damage Coverage is offered through American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.

travel insurance adhd

Watch: Marketing leaders have to help their companies keep pace with the rapidly changing worlds of their customers, says Elizabeth Rutledge, CMO of American Express

travel insurance adhd

  • Main content

IMAGES

  1. Tips for travelling stress free with ADHD

    travel insurance adhd

  2. Travel Insurance Explained

    travel insurance adhd

  3. Travel Insurance Explained

    travel insurance adhd

  4. The Quick Guide To: Travel Insurance

    travel insurance adhd

  5. What is Travel Insurance

    travel insurance adhd

  6. Travel Insurance 101: A Complete Guide To Hassle-Free Travel

    travel insurance adhd

COMMENTS

  1. ADHD and Travel: Tips and Strategies for Solo Travelers

    Get advice and coping strategies for managing ADHD travel anxiety - and for turning your unique brain chemistry to your advantage. ... WorldNomads.com Pty Limited markets and promotes travel insurance products of nib Travel Services Limited (License No.1446874), at PO Box 1051, Grand Cayman KY1-1102, Cayman Islands. World Nomads Inc.(1585422 ...

  2. The Complete Guide to ADHD and Traveling: Challenges, Tips and the Best

    Conclusions on ADHD and Traveling. Going through life with ADHD is a challenge and never more so than when traveling. Fortunately, with the right supports, there are no limitations to what you can do. I'm a 30-something with ADHD and I frequently travel solo. Sure, it can be complicated. Traveling with ADHD can be exhausting and sometimes ...

  3. Revealed: medical conditions you must declare when buying travel insurance

    As a general rule, these medical conditions must be disclosed before purchase, according to Medical Travel Compared: Type 2 Diabetes - if you received treatment or diagnosis within two years. Diagnosed current pregnancy complications - relevant if you are pregnant and are suffering complications. Epilepsy - if a seizure resulted in a visit to ...

  4. The ADHD Traveler's Checklist

    7 Days Before You Go: 12. Trip to the pharmacy. Go to the pharmacy, and refill your prescriptions, including ADHD meds. 13. Printing. Print out all of your travel information, such as flight details, hotel reservations, train tickets, car hire information, etc. Include your reservations, confirmation numbers and contact telephone numbers.

  5. ADHD Travel Insurance

    Is ADHD a pre-existing medical condition for travel insurance? It is crucial that you declare all medical conditions before going on holiday so that you are fully covered if you needed to make a claim. AllClear offers Travel Insurance for pre existing conditions, including ADHD has covered over 1300 medical conditions since 2000.

  6. ADHD Travel Insurance

    ADHD Travel Insurance. If you are travelling abroad and have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), you should get a Travel Insurance policy before your departure. Travelling with ADHD can be both exciting and challenging. The logistics, planning, and potential for disruption can be overwhelming.

  7. Travelling with ADHD: Advice from Psychologists

    People with ADHD can make them too slowly aka 'decision paralysis'. Delaying decision making can lead to planning becoming rushed at the last minute - causing stress and further worsening ADHD symptoms. On the other hand, impulsivity can mean making plans without a great deal of planning or thinking things through.

  8. Tips for travelling stress free with ADHD

    Travel can be thrilling, but also challenging for adults with ADHD — a neurological condition marked by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsivity. The planning, organization and research it takes to book accommodation and flights, pack and more can be overwhelming.

  9. Declaring pre-existing conditions for travel insurance

    A decent travel insurance policy will include cover for medical treatment abroad, often up to £20m. But before offering you cover, the insurer will want to work out the likelihood of a claim on the medical part of your travel insurance policy - and so they will ask about your pre-existing conditions.

  10. 11 Best Travel Insurance Companies in July 2024

    Best travel insurance category. Company winner. Best overall. Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection. Best for emergency medical coverage. Allianz Global Assistance. Best for travelers with pre ...

  11. 12 Best Travel Insurance Companies Of July 2024

    The Best Travel Insurance Companies. PrimeCover - Best for Evacuation. Travel Insured International - Best for Non-Medical Evacuation. WorldTrips - Great for Add-On Coverage. TravelSafe ...

  12. International Travel with Medications: Know Before You Go

    When you travel with medications abroad, good planning can help avoid getting your prescriptions confiscated — or worse. ... Amphetamines, such as ADHD medications; ... Travel Medical Insurance ...

  13. Travel Insurance for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Travel Insurance for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric condition that affects an individual's behaviour in terms of restlessness, impulsiveness, and distraction. It is more commonly diagnosed during the early stages of childhood, and appears more frequently in men.

  14. What medical conditions to declare for travel insurance?

    Some of the medical conditions you need to declare for travel insurance quotes include: Respiratory conditions. Heart, liver, kidney, brain or circulatory disease or damage, Diabetes , Strokes or ...

  15. Best Travel Medical Insurance Of 2024

    Editors' Take. We recommend checking out the Travel Medical Basic USA plan if you value having urgent care and emergency room care covered at 100% over coverage for pre-existing conditions ...

  16. Travel insurance for pre-existing medical conditions

    Insurance cover for pre-existing medical conditions varies widely. You may have to pay more to get cover for your pre-existing medical condition. Travel insurance is essential in the case of illness or injury while travelling. Overseas medical costs can be extortionate, and if you have an existing medical condition, it increases the chance you ...

  17. Specialist insurance for mental health problems

    Cura. 0800 567 7450. curainsurance.co.uk. Offers a variety of insurance services including life, critical illness and income protection, for people with pre-existing medical conditions including mental health problems.

  18. ADHD Travel Insurance

    Travelling with ADHD. If you are an adult who has been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder then you will be among an estimated 1.5 million adults with the condition, according to ADHD Action. It says that 2.5% of adults and 5% of children in the UK have the hereditary condition. Living with ADHD means an adult will often ...

  19. Travel insurance : r/ADHDUK

    A common clause in travel insurance policies is that an undisclosed condition being discovered can invalidate your claim. The premium might go up a little, but I've found that because my trips have never been cancelled by my adhd that it's a minor increase on before my diagnosis (but then I disclose my depression and anxiety so I've never had ...

  20. Going abroad next month. Do I need to declared ADHD on my Travel

    Do I need to declared ADHD on my Travel Insurance Policy? Last time, I didn't declare but now that I am officially undergoing treatment and taking meds, should I be declaring it on the insurance. My father told me that I should look into it as some insurance companies request medical records and could potentially use as an excuse not pay out.

  21. ADHD: Study shows differences in kids' brains who have the disorder

    Norman, the NIH researcher, said the images build on earlier research. For example, when children with ADHD play games that require attention and controlling impulses, their brain scans showed ...

  22. ADHD & Life Insurance

    ADHD & Critical Illness Cover. Critical illness cover pays out a cash lump sum of money, if you are diagnosed with a medical condition that is listed in the insurer's claims set e.g. cancer, heart attack, stroke. When looking critical illness cover options for people living with ADHD, you'll probably discover that policies are generally ...

  23. ADHD and Travel Insurance

    Posted by u/sezpon - 2 votes and 1 comment

  24. 8 travel insurance mistakes to avoid before your next cruise

    Travel insurance mistakes and misunderstandings are common among cruise ship passengers and can lead to travelers finding themselves uninsured or under-insured when they encounter a problem on their trip. That's something TPG wants to help you avoid. Here are the most common cruise travel insurance mistakes I've encountered so you will know how ...

  25. 8 Reasons It's Worth It To Buy Travel Insurance (And 6 Times To ...

    The number one reason people buy travel insurance is to cover an expensive trip. And if you're traveling overseas, chances are your travels will cost a lot of money.

  26. Travel Insurance, ADHD & Aspergers

    whambar's Reviews. Hotel Reviews: 1. Restaurant Reviews: 4. yep, I will be declaring my ds's aspergers, also I think that you may need a letter from doctors if your child is on a specific medication for their adhd (check as may be wrong). Added that he also has another medical condition too that I have also declared.

  27. American Express Travel Protection: Insurance Benefits and ...

    New trip cancellation and interruption insurance from American Express credit cards will provide you with up to $10,000 in coverage (and up to $20,000 per account per year) you can use for ...

  28. should i get another insurance here or not? for ADHD..

    If your university accepted you to study here, you should already have a regular insurance that covers this. You sure you do not have one? Adhd meds should be around 70 euro per month, depending on your dose. hallo, I am an international student here in berlin, and was recently diagnosed with adhd. i have travel insurance "ADHD" that is ...

  29. Travel Insurance: An Expensive Lesson In Getting the Coverage You Need

    As always, I had purchased travel insurance. As always, I assumed cancellation coverage was for any cancellation of a common carrier resulting in you losing non-refundable deposits. I also assumed that purchasing "travel interruption for any reason" coverage for 75% of the trip cost meant just that, for any reason.