Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

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Mexico Travel Advisory

Travel advisory august 22, 2023, see state summaries.

Reissued after periodic review with general security updates, and the removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

U.S. citizens are advised to adhere to restrictions on U.S. government employee travel. State-specific restrictions are included in the individual state advisories below. U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, except daytime travel within Baja California and between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Guerrero state  due to  crime .
  • Michoacan state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Sinaloa state due to  crime  and  kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Chihuahua state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Durango state  due to  crime .
  • Guanajuato state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Jalisco state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Morelos state  due to  crime .
  • Sonora state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to  crime .
  • Baja California Sur state  due to  crime .
  • Chiapas state  due to  crime .
  • Coahuila state  due to  crime .
  • Hidalgo state  due to  crime .
  • Mexico City  due to  crime .
  • Mexico State  due to  crime .
  • Nayarit state  due to  crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Oaxaca state  due to  crime .
  • Puebla state  due to  crime  and  kidnapping .
  • Queretaro state  due to  crime .
  • Quintana Roo state  due to  crime .
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to  crime and kidnapping .
  • Tabasco state  due to  crime .
  • Tlaxcala state due to  crime .
  • Veracruz state  due to  crime .

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state
  • Yucatan state

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime  advisories  and  alerts , which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest travel health information related to your travel. 

Aguascalientes state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Aguascalientes state.

Baja California state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Transnational criminal organizations compete in the border area to establish narco-trafficking and human smuggling routes. Violent crime and gang activity are common. Travelers should remain on main highways and avoid remote locations. Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana. Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employees must adhere to the noted restrictions:

  • Mexicali Valley:  U.S. government employees should avoid the Mexicali Valley due to the heightened possibility of violence between rival cartel factions.  The boundaries of the restricted area are: to the east, the Baja California/Arizona and Baja California/Sonora borders; to the south, from La Ventana (on Highway 5) due east to the Colorado River; to the west, Highway 5; and to the north, Boulevard Lazaro Cardenas/Highway 92/Highway 1 to Carretera Aeropuerto, from the intersection of Highway 1 and Carretera Aeropuerto due north to the Baja California/California border, and from that point eastward along the Baja California/California border.
  • Travelers may use Highways 2 and 2D to transit between Mexicali, Los Algodones, and San Luis Rio Colorado during daylight hours. Travelers may also use Highways 1 and 8 to transit to and from the Mexicali Airport during daylight hours.  Travel on Highway 5 is permissible during daylight hours.

There are no other travel restrictions for U.S. government employees in Baja California state. These include high-traffic tourism areas of border and coastal communities, such as  Tijuana ,  Ensenada , and  Rosarito .

Baja California Sur state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Baja California Sur state.

Campeche state – Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Campeche state.

Chiapas state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Chiapas state.

Chihuahua state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Battles for territory between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens and U.S. government employees, including restaurants and malls during daylight hours. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

U.S. government employee travel is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez:  U.S. government employees may travel to the area of Ciudad Juarez bounded to the east by Bulevar Independencia; to the south by De los Montes Urales/Avenida Manuel J Clouthier/Carretera de Juárez; to the west by Via Juan Gabriel/Avenida de los Insurgentes/Calle Miguel Ahumada/Francisco Javier Mina/Melchor Ocampo; and to the north by the U.S.-Mexico border.  Direct travel to the Ciudad Juarez airport (officially called the Abraham González International Airport) and the factories located along Bulevar Independencia and Las Torres is permitted.  Travel to San Jerónimo is permitted only through the United States via the Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry; travel via Anapra is prohibited.

U.S. government employees may only travel from Ciudad Juarez to the city of Chihuahua during daylight hours via Federal Highway 45, with stops permitted only at the Guardia Nacional División Caminos station, the Umbral del Milenio overlook area, the border inspection station at KM 35, and the shops and restaurants on Federal Highway 45 in the city of Ahumada.

  • U.S. government employees may travel between Ciudad Juarez and Ascension via Highway 2.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grandes, Mata Ortiz, Colonia Juárez, Colonia LeBaron, Paquimé and San Buenaventura):  U.S. government employees may travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours via Mexico Federal Highway 2, and subsequently Federal Highway 10, to Nuevo Casas Grandes.  Employees are permitted to stay overnight in the cities of Nuevo Casas Grandes and Casas Grandes only.
  • City of Chihuahua:  U.S. government employees may travel at any time to the area of the city of Chihuahua bounded to the north by Avenida Transformación; to the east by Avenida Tecnológico/Manuel Gómez Morín/Highway 16/Blvd.José Fuentes Mares; to the west by the city boundary; and to the south by Periférico Francisco R. Almada.
  • U.S. government employees may travel on Highways 45, 16, and 45D through the city of Chihuahua and to the Chihuahua airport (officially called the General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport). 
  • U.S. government employees may travel to Santa Eulalia to the east of the city of Chihuahua, as well as to Juan Aldama via Highway 16 to the northeast.
  • U.S. government employees may travel south of the city of Chihuahua on Highway 45 to the southern boundary of Parral, including each town directly connected to Highway 45, including Lázaro Cárdenas, Pedro Meoqui, Santa Cruz de Rosales, Delicias, Camargo, Ciudad Jiménez, and Parral itself.
  • U.S. government employees may only travel on official business from the city of Chihuahua on Highway 16 to Ciudad Cuauhtémoc bounded by Highway 21 to the north and east, Highway 5 to the west, and Bulevar Jorge Castillo Cabrera to the south. 
  • Ojinaga:  U.S. government employees must travel to Ojinaga via U.S. Highway 67 and enter through the U.S. Port of Entry in Presidio, Texas.
  • Palomas:  U.S. government employees may travel to Palomas via U.S. highways through the U.S. Port of Entry in Columbus, New Mexico, or via Highway 2 in Mexico.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Chihuahua, including  Copper Canyon .

Coahuila state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur in parts of Coahuila state. 

U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Zaragoza, Morelos, Allende, Nava, Jimenez, Villa Union, Guerrero, and Hidalgo municipalities : U.S. government employees may not travel to these municipalities.
  • Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuña:  U.S. government employees must travel directly from the United States and observe a curfew from midnight to 6:00 a.m. in both cities.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Coahuila state.

Colima state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.  

Violent crime and gang activity are widespread. Most homicides are targeted assassinations against members of criminal organizations. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.  

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with noted restrictions: 

  • Manzanillo:   U.S. government employee travel is limited to the tourist and port areas of Manzanillo.  
  • Employees traveling to Manzanillo from Guadalajara must use Federal Toll Road 54D during daylight hours.  

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Colima state. 

Durango state – Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime.

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Durango state.

  • West and south of Federal Highway 45:  U.S. government employees may not travel to this region of Durango state.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Durango state.

Guanajuato state – Reconsider Travel

Gang violence, often associated with the theft of petroleum and natural gas from the state oil company and other suppliers, occurs in Guanajuato, primarily in the south and central areas of the state.  Of particular concern is the high number of murders in the southern region of the state associated with cartel-related violence. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Areas south of Federal Highway 45D:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area south of and including Federal Highway 45D, Celaya, Salamanca, and Irapuato.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Guanajuato state, which includes tourist areas in:  San Miguel de Allende ,  Guanajuato City , and  surrounding areas.

Guerrero state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime.

Crime and violence are widespread. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping in previous years.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following area with the noted restrictions:

  • Taxco:  U.S. government employees must use Federal Highway 95D, which passes through Cuernavaca, Morelos, and stay within downtown tourist areas of Taxco. Employees may visit Grutas de Cacahuamilpa National Park during the day with a licensed tour operator.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Guerrero, including to tourist areas in  Acapulco ,  Zihuatanejo , and  Ixtapa .

Hidalgo state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Hidalgo state.

Jalisco state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state. In Guadalajara, territorial battles between criminal groups take place in tourist areas. Shooting incidents between criminal groups have injured or killed innocent bystanders. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Jalisco-Michoacan border and Federal Highway 110:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area between Federal Highway 110 and the Jalisco-Michoacan border, nor travel on Federal Highway 110 between Tuxpan, Jalisco, and the Michoacan border.
  • Federal Highway 80:  U.S. government employees may not travel on Federal Highway 80 south of Cocula.

There are no other restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Jalisco state which includes tourist areas in:  Guadalajara Metropolitan Area ,  Puerto Vallarta (including neighboring Riviera Nayarit) ,  Chapala , and  Ajijic .

Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico City. Use additional caution, particularly at night, outside of the frequented tourist areas where police and security patrol more routinely. Petty crime occurs frequently in both tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico City.

Mexico State (Estado de Mexico) – Exercise Increased Caution

Both violent and non-violent crime occur throughout Mexico State. Use additional caution in areas outside of the frequented tourist areas, although petty crime occurs frequently in tourist areas as well.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Mexico State.

Michoacan state – Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime and kidnapping.

Crime and violence are widespread in Michoacan state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Federal Highway 15D:   U.S. government employees may travel on Federal Highway 15D to transit the state between Mexico City and Guadalajara.
  • Morelia:  U.S. government employees may travel by air and by land using Federal Highways 43 or 48D from Federal Highway 15D.
  • Lazaro Cardenas:  U.S. government employees must travel by air only and limit activities to the city center or port areas.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of the state of Michoacan, including the portions of the  Monarch Butterfly Reserve  located in Michoacan.

Morelos state – Reconsider Travel

Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Morelos state.

Nayarit state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout Nayarit state.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S government employees in Nayarit state.

Nuevo Leon state – Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping.

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Nuevo Leon state.

Oaxaca state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence occur throughout the state.

U.S. travelers are reminded that U.S. government employees must adhere to the following travel restrictions:

  • Isthmus region:  U.S. government employees may not travel to the area of Oaxaca bounded by Federal Highway 185D to the west, Federal Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca-Chiapas border to the east.  This includes the cities of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas Atempa.  
  • Federal Highway 200 northwest of Pinotepa:  U.S. government employees may not use Federal Highway 200 between Pinotepa and the Oaxaca-Guerrero border.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees to other parts of Oaxaca state, which include tourist areas in:  Oaxaca City ,  Monte Alban ,  Puerto Escondido,  and  Huatulco .

Puebla state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Puebla state.

Queretaro state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Queretaro state.

Quintana Roo state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur in any location, at any time, including in popular tourist destinations.  Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations. 

While not directed at tourists, shootings between rival gangs have injured innocent bystanders.  Additionally, U.S. citizens have been the victims of both non-violent and violent crimes in tourist and non-tourist areas.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Quintana Roo state. However, personnel are advised to exercise increased situational awareness after dark in downtown areas of Cancun, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen, and to remain in well-lit pedestrian streets and tourist zones.

San Luis Potosi state – Exercise Increased Caution

Criminal activity and violence may occur throughout the state.  U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in San Luis Potosi state.

Sinaloa state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based in and operating in Sinaloa. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Mazatlan:  U.S. government employees may travel to Mazatlan by air or sea only, are limited to the Zona Dorada and historic town center, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport and sea terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Topolobampo:  U.S. government employees may travel to Los Mochis and Topolobampo by air or sea only, are restricted to the city and the port, and must travel via direct routes between these destinations and the airport.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Sinaloa state.

Sonora state – Reconsider Travel

Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. Violent crime is widespread. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping. Travelers should maintain a heightened level of awareness of their surroundings in all their travels in Sonora.  Security incidents may occur in any area of Sonora.

  • Travel between Hermosillo and Nogales:  U.S. government employees may travel between the U.S. Ports of Entry in Nogales and Hermosillo during daylight hours via Federal Highway 15 only. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures. Travelers should exercise caution and avoid unnecessary stops as security incidents, including sporadic, armed carjackings, and shootings have been reported along this highway during daylight hours. Travelers should have a full tank of gas and inform friends or family members of their planned travel.
  • Nogales:  U.S. government employees may not travel in the triangular area north of Avenida Tecnologico, west of Bulevar Luis Donaldo Colosio (Periferico), nor east of Federal Highway 15D (Corredor Fiscal). U.S. government employees also may not travel in the residential and business areas to east of the railroad tracks along Plutarco Elias Calle (HWY 15) and Calle Ruiz Cortino, including the business area around the Morley pedestrian gate port-of-entry. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Nogales due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.  
  • Puerto Peñasco:  U.S. government employees may travel between Puerto Peñasco and the Lukeville-Sonoyta U.S. Port of Entry during daylight hours via Federal Highway 8 only. They may not travel on any other route to Puerto Peñasco. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in Puerto Peñasco. due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Triangular region near Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry:  U.S. government employees may not travel into or through the triangular region west of the Mariposa U.S. Port of Entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar municipality.
  • San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea, and Agua Prieta : U.S. government employees may travel directly from the nearest U.S. Port of Entry to San Luis Rio Colorado, Cananea (via Douglas Port of Entry), and Agua Prieta, but may not go beyond the city limits. Travel is limited to daylight hours only. Travel between Nogales and Cananea via Imuris is not permitted. U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these cities due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.
  • Eastern and southern Sonora (including San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos):  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and State Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16. U.S. government employees may travel to San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas and Alamos; travel to Alamos is only permitted by air and within city limits.  U.S. government employees may not travel to areas of Sonora south of Federal Highway 16 and east of Federal Highway 15 (south of Hermosillo), as well as all points south of Guaymas, including Empalme, Guaymas, Obregon, and Navojoa.  U.S. government employees may not use ANY taxi services, public buses, nor ride-share applications in these areas due to a lack of secure vetting and/or dispatching procedures and the danger of kidnapping and other violent crimes.

U.S. government employees may travel to other parts of Sonora state in compliance with the above restrictions, including tourist areas in: Hermosillo , Bahia de Kino , and Puerto Penasco .

Tabasco state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tabasco state.

Tamaulipas state – Do Not Travel

Organized crime activity – including gun battles, murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, forced disappearances, extortion, and sexual assault – is common along the northern border and in Ciudad Victoria. Criminal groups target public and private passenger buses, as well as private automobiles traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers and demanding ransom payments.

Heavily armed members of criminal groups often patrol areas of the state and operate with impunity particularly along the border region from Reynosa to Nuevo Laredo.  In these areas, local law enforcement has limited capacity to respond to incidents of crime. Law enforcement capacity is greater in the tri-city area of Tampico, Ciudad Madero, and Altamira, which has a lower rate of violent criminal activity compared to the rest of the state.

U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo:  U.S. government employees may only travel within a limited radius around and between the U.S. Consulates in Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, their homes, the respective U.S. Ports of Entry, and limited downtown sites, subject to an overnight curfew.
  • Overland travel in Tamaulipas:  U.S. government employees may not travel between cities in Tamaulipas using interior Mexican highways. Travel between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey is limited to Federal Highway 85D during daylight hours with prior authorization.

U.S. government employees may not travel to other parts of Tamaulipas state.

Tlaxcala state – Exercise Increased Caution

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Tlaxcala state.

Veracruz state – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime and gang activity occur with increasing frequency in Veracruz, particularly in the center and south near Cordoba and Coatzacoalcos. While most gang-related violence is targeted, violence perpetrated by criminal organizations can affect bystanders. Impromptu roadblocks requiring payment to pass are common.

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Veracruz state.

Yucatan state – Exercise Normal Precautions

There are no restrictions on travel for U.S. government employees in Yucatan state, which include tourist areas in:  Chichen Itza ,  Merida ,  Uxmal , and  Valladolid .

Zacatecas state – Do Not Travel

Violent crime, extortion, and gang activity are widespread in Zacatecas state. U.S. citizens and LPRs have been victims of kidnapping.

  • Zacatecas City : U.S. government employee travel is limited to Zacatecas City proper, and employees may not travel overland to Zacatecas City.
  • U.S. government employees may not travel to other areas of Zacatecas state.

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World News | Mexico danger map: Latest warnings from U.S….

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World news | 49ers vs. lions: here’s what you need to know about getting to and watching sunday’s nfc championship game, world news | mexico danger map: latest warnings from u.s. state department.

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Update, 2023: The travel warnings have been changed since this article was published. The more recent map is here .

Even as travel is discouraged to all of Mexico because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. State Department continues to update its warnings concerning kidnappings and other crimes in the country’s states.

Level 4 : The five states with the sternest “do not travel” advisory, because of kidnappings and other crimes, are the northern border state of Tamaulipas and the Pacific coast states of Sinaloa, Colima, Michoacán and Guerrero. They are shown in red on the map above.

Level 3 : Baja California (Norte) has been added this year to the list of states for which visitors are advised to “reconsider travel” because of crime. The 10 other states in that category are Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Mexico, Morelos, Nayarit, Sonora and Zacatecas. They are shown in orange on the map.

The warning for Baja California, which includes Tijuana and Ensenada, cites violence by criminal organizations involved in drug trafficking and human smuggling. “Of particular concern is the high number of homicides in the non-tourist areas of Tijuana,” the advisory says. “Most homicides appeared to be targeted; however, criminal organization assassinations and territorial disputes can result in bystanders being injured or killed.” It also mentions that U.S. citizens have been kidnapped in the state. Baja California Sur, which includes the beach resorts of Los Cabos, remains in Level 2.

Level 2 : Except for the two Level 1 states, travelers to all the rest are advised to “exercise increased caution.” These are shown in yellow. They are: Aguas Calientes, Baja California Sur, Chiapas, Hidalgo, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretara, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosi, Tabasco, Tlaxcala and Veracruz. Mexico City (Distrito Federal) is Level 2, though it is surrounded by Level 3 states.

Level 1: The State Department advises “normal precautions” when traveling to Campeche or Yucatán, shown in green.

In addition to the general tourist warnings, specific prohibitions are issued to U.S. government employees staying or traveling in Mexico; the State Department advises that all U.S. citizens adhere to those rules.

Click here for the full document on the warnings.

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This Map Shows Where Americans Are Being Told 'Do Not Travel' in Mexico

The State Department issued new travel warnings for parts of Mexico on Wednesday, advising American travelers to entirely avoid five regions due to crime.

The advisory tells Americans “do not travel” to the five Mexican coastal states of Sinaloa, Colima, Michoacán, Guerrero, and Tamaulipas. It also suggests exercising “increased caution” or “reconsider travel” to other parts of the country.

Here’s a map of Mexico’s five states the U.S. deemed most dangerous, as well as the general warnings across the rest of the country. The State Department gave Mexico a level 2 travel warning overall, encouraging travelers to exercise increased caution in general.

“Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread,” the advisory states.

The latest advisory gives the five Mexican states the same warning level as risky travel destinations like Syria, Yemen and Somalia.

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NBC 7 San Diego

Thinking About Spring Break in Mexico? These Are the Travel Warnings You Should Know

Tamaulipas, where the deadly kidnapping of four americans occurred last week, was listed on the state department’s “do not travel” list, published march 9, 2023 • updated on march 9, 2023 at 5:56 am.

Spring break season has arrived and college students will be vacationing in many parts of the United States, Caribbean, Mexico, and other destinations around of the world.

After the most recent kidnapping of Americans in Mexico, visitors – including spring breakers – are being advised to continue practicing extreme caution while in the country.

A group of four childhood friends from North Carolina drove to Mexico last week for a medical procedure and were attacked and kidnapped by cartel gunman , FBI officials said. Two of the Americans were killed and two survived the deadly encounter, in which officials say may have been a case of mistaken identity.

Tamaulipas, where the kidnapping occurred, was listed on the State Department’s “Do Not Travel” list, citing a heightened risk of crime and kidnapping.

Get San Diego local news, weather forecasts, sports and lifestyle stories to your inbox. Sign up for NBC San Diego newsletters.

“Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico,” the department wrote on it’s travel advisory , which was last updated in October.

U.S. travel advisories are issued in four levels: exercise normal precautions, exercise increased caution, reconsider travel, and do not travel.

These states are on the Do Not Travel list:

State officials also warned that the U.S. government is limited to the emergency services it can provide in many parts of the Mexico and issued guidelines for Americans visiting the country.

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.

Click here for more safety tips on traveling to Mexico.

This article tagged under:

do not travel map of mexico

25 Republican governors back Texas in escalating border standoff with US government

  • Published 1 day ago

A Texas National Guard soldier installs additional razor wire at the border

Republican governors in half of the US have backed Texas in an intensifying standoff with the federal government over illegal immigration.

The Supreme Court ruled this week against Texas Governor Greg Abbott, who has strung razor wire along miles of the frontier with Mexico.

But the Republican has vowed to add more razor wire to crack down on what he calls an invasion.

A record 300,000-plus illegal migrants crossed the border in December alone.

On Thursday, 25 Republican governors released a joint statement of solidarity with Mr Abbott for "stepping up to protect American citizens from historic levels of illegal immigrants, deadly drugs like fentanyl, and terrorists entering our country".

The Texas town caught in America's border battle

The latest border flashpoint focuses on a small stretch of the Rio Grande River that has become one of the busiest spots for migrants crossing illegally from Mexico.

As part of his Operation Lone Star, Mr Abbott has sought to block or deter entry into his state, including by installing about 30 miles (48km) of razor wire barriers along the city of Eagle Pass.

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Watch: A look at the US border as immigration debate heats up

On Monday the Supreme Court handed a victory to the administration of President Joe Biden, a Democrat, in its standoff with Texas.

The justices ruled by 5-4 that US Border Patrol, a federal agency, could cut or clear out the concertina wire set up by the Texas National Guard.

The justice department had argued the fencing hampers the work of Border Patrol agents in that it poses a danger to both migrants and law enforcement. Some of the illegal migrants have cut themselves on the wire.

Appearing on Fox News on Thursday, Mr Abbott said: "Because the Biden administration has really, truly abdicated its responsibility to secure the border and enforce the laws, Texas, very simply, is securing the border."

He has posted photos of the Texas National Guard laying down new razor wire along the river.

The move does not appear to violate the Supreme Court order, which granted permission for the removal of existing wire, while saying nothing about adding new barriers.

Democrats are urging the president to take a tougher stance against Texas.

"Governor Greg Abbott is using the Texas National Guard to obstruct and create chaos at the border," congressman Joaquin Castro wrote on X, calling for federal control over the guardsmen.

Governor Abbott is also facing legal challenges from the Biden White House over his orders to install floating barriers in the Rio Grande and to jail thousands of migrants on trespassing charges.

And, as the governor continues to bus migrants to Democratic cities and states, pressure is mounting on Mr Biden to take drastic action to stem the flow of arrivals.

Last week, Mr Biden said he was "ready to act", but argued lawmakers on Capitol Hill must first agree on significant policy reforms.

The prospects of a grand bargain, however, in either chamber of Congress, let alone both, appear slim.

Republicans in the US House of Representatives are currently leading an effort to impeach and remove the president's top border official, Homeland Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

An emerging bipartisan border deal in the US Senate meanwhile faces objections from right and left.

Former President Donald Trump, the Republican White House frontrunner, has reportedly pressured allies to kill the bill to avoid giving Mr Biden a win in an election year.

Immigration is a central issue ahead of the November 2024 general election, with voters in Iowa and New Hampshire delivering primary victories to Mr Trump in part due to their concerns over the border.

Related Topics

  • Mexico–US border
  • US immigration
  • United States

More on this story

  • Published 3 August 2023

Magali Urbina

Supreme Court sides with Biden in Texas border dispute

  • Published 5 days ago

A Border Patrol agent carries one year-old Juan Diego ahead of his mother through the opening they made in the razor wire to allow migrants from Venezuela to enter after they crossed the Rio Grande in Eagle Pass, Texas

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Supreme Court Backs Biden in Dispute With Texas Over Border Barrier

A federal appeals court had ruled that Border Patrol agents may not remove concertina wire erected by the state except for medical emergencies.

A member of the National Guard stepping off a vehicle near barbed wire.

By Adam Liptak

Reporting from Washington

The Supreme Court sided with the Biden administration on Monday, allowing federal officials to cut or remove parts of a concertina-wire barrier along the Mexican border that Texas erected to keep migrants from crossing into the state.

The ruling, by a 5-to-4 vote, was a victory for the administration in the increasingly bitter dispute between the White House and Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas, an outspoken critic of President Biden’s border policy who has shipped busloads of migrants to northern cities.

Since 2021, Mr. Abbott, a third-term Republican, has mounted a multibillion-dollar campaign to impose stringent measures at the border to deter migrants. Those include erecting concertina wire along the banks of the Rio Grande, installing a barrier of buoys in the river and enacting a sweeping law that allows state and local law enforcement to arrest migrants crossing from Mexico .

In lifting an appeals court ruling that had generally prohibited the administration from removing the wire while the court considers the case, the justices gave no reasons, which is typical when they act on emergency applications. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the court’s three liberal members to form a majority.

A spokesman for Mr. Abbott, Andrew Mahaleris, defended Texas’ practices and vowed to keep pressing its case. “The absence of razor wire and other deterrence strategies encourages migrants to make unsafe and illegal crossings between ports of entry,” he said in a statement, adding, “This case is ongoing, and Governor Abbott will continue fighting to defend Texas’ property and its constitutional authority to secure the border.”

Angelo Fernández Hernández, a White House spokesman, embraced the decision and called on Congress to come to a bipartisan deal on changes to the immigration system. “Texas’ political stunts, like placing razor wire near the border, simply make it harder and more dangerous for frontline personnel to do their jobs,” he said in a statement. “Ultimately, we need adequate resources and policy changes to address our broken immigration system.”

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit last month limited the ability of federal Border Patrol agents to cut the wire. The panel prohibited agents “from damaging, destroying or otherwise interfering with Texas’ c-wire fence” while the appeal is pending, but made an exception for medical emergencies that are likely to result in “serious bodily injury or death.”

Ken Paxton, Texas’ attorney general, sued the administration in October, saying that Border Patrol agents had unlawfully destroyed state property and thwarted the state’s efforts to block migrants from crossing the border. According to the lawsuit, border agents cut the wire at least 20 times “to admit aliens illegally entering Texas.”

Migrants have been injured by the wire, and drownings in the Rio Grande’s swift currents have become more common . In court papers , Mr. Paxton argued that federal officials using bolt cutters and forklifts had destroyed parts of the barrier for no reason other than to allow migrants to enter.

In the Biden administration’s emergency application , Solicitor General Elizabeth B. Prelogar rejected the contention that federal officials had done anything improper. “Border Patrol agents’ exercise of discretion regarding the means of enabling the apprehension, inspection and processing of noncitizens in no way suggests that they cut wire for impermissible purposes,” she wrote.

Calling the appeals court’s injunction “manifestly wrong,” Ms. Prelogar said the barrier interfered with Border Patrol agents’ responsibilities.

“The injunction prohibits agents from passing through or moving physical obstacles erected by the state that prevent access to the very border they are charged with patrolling and the individuals they are charged with apprehending and inspecting,” she wrote. “And it removes a key form of officer discretion to prevent the development of deadly situations, including by mitigating the serious risks of drowning and death from hypothermia or heat exposure.”

The exception for medical emergencies was insufficient, Ms. Prelogar wrote. “It can take 10 to 30 minutes to cut through Texas’ dense layers of razor wire,” she wrote. “By the time a medical emergency is apparent, it may be too late to render lifesaving aid.”

The injunction was also unjustified, Ms. Prelogar wrote. “Balanced against the impairment of federal law enforcement and risk to human life,” she wrote, “the court of appeals cited as Texas’ harm only the price of wire and the cost of closing a gap created by Border Patrol agents.”

Mr. Paxton asked the justices to strike a different balance.

“It is in the public interest to deter unlawful agency action and to respect property rights,” he wrote. “It is also in the public interest to reduce the flow of deadly fentanyl; combat human trafficking; protect Texans from unlawful trespass and violent attacks by criminal cartels; and minimize the risks to people, both U.S. citizens and migrants, of drowning while making perilous journeys to and through illegal points of entry.”

This month, federal officials said that when Border Patrol agents tried to respond to reports of a drowning in an area where the state had placed barriers, they were “physically barred” by state officials. Texas officials disputed that account.

J. David Goodman contributed reporting.

Adam Liptak covers the Supreme Court and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments. A graduate of Yale Law School, he practiced law for 14 years before joining The Times in 2002. More about Adam Liptak

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US issues 'do not travel' warning for Mexico

Us issues travel warnings for parts of mexico.

The map is color-graded to inform travelers about areas they should be taking precaution in while visiting the country.

The federal government has issued travel advisories for parts of Mexico as many Americans prepare to take their spring break vacations.

This comes after the FBI announced four U.S. citizens were kidnapped after gunmen opened fire on their vehicle in the northern Mexico border city of Matamoros. Two of the Americans were killed, and the other two found alive after the violent shootout and abduction that was captured on video.

A relative of one of the victims said the four had traveled together from the Carolinas, entering from Brownsville, Texas, so one of them could get a tummy tuck from a doctor in Matamoros, where Friday’s kidnapping took place. The FBI said that the vehicle came under fire shortly after it entered Mexico.

RELATED: US issues 'do not travel' warning for Mexico

2 missing Americans kidnapped in Mexico found dead and 2 alive, official says

Two of four Americans abducted in Mexico last week when their van was caught in a shootout were found dead, a top Mexican official said Tuesday. The two others have been found alive, with one wounded.

Different colors on the map are explained below:

  • Areas on the map marked in red are under a firm "do not travel" advisory.
  • Areas in orange are classified as places where vacationers should "reconsider travel."
  • The parts of the map with lines running through them are areas with a higher security risk.
  • Areas on the map marked in yellow are areas the government advises travelers to "exercise increased caution."

If you would like to take a closer look at the map, click here .

Should travelers worry about being kidnapped in Mexico? Travel experts discuss safety in Mexico.

do not travel map of mexico

The high-profile case of four U.S. citizens being kidnapped in Mexico sent shock waves through the nation. Two were killed last week after getting caught in the crossfire of cartel violence in the border city of Matamoros. 

Many are wondering what's next for the popular tourist destination, and whether Mexico is safe for travel. 

The four Americans – one woman and two men from South Carolina – crossed the southern border for cosmetic surgery last Friday when a cartel shootout erupted.

Social media videos show the gunmen pulling the Americans from their car and driving away, all during daylight. Mexican officials announced Tuesday that they had found two dead. the other The two survivors were escorted back to the U.S.

Is it safe to take a taxi in Cancun?: Here are the safest ways to get around, per travel agents.

Learn more: Best travel insurance

With 2 Americans dead in Matamoros: A cartel-scarred Mexican border town wonders what's next

Violence around border cities is not unusual and can involve Mexicans or migrants with little public attention, but it typically doesn't involve Americans. Officials said the abduction was probably a case of mistaken identity , but the FBI is investigating further.

Meanwhile, questions arose on how the Mexican and U.S. governments will respond, which could affect regular travel to Mexico. A heavy-handed response could likely mean "a wave of violence where it gets worse before it gets better," said Michael Ballard, director of intelligence at Global Guardian , a firm that specializes in travel security. 

Currently, the travel advisory for Mexico warns Americans of crime and kidnapping. On Tuesday, White House press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said the State Department takes it "seriously" when it comes to providing "clear, timely, and reliable information about every country in the world ... so they can make informed travel decisions." 

Is Mexico safe to travel to?

In 2021, nearly 29 million American travelers  headed down to Mexico. That same year, about 75 American citizens died by homicide in Mexico, according to the most recent U.S. State Department statistics. 

Mexico is "a tricky place" when it comes to travel and safety because "the security landscape and the security dynamic is so different state to state and city to city," according to Ballard. 

Unlike some other countries, Mexico's travel advisory assesses each state individually. 

The agency issued a "do not travel to" warning for the Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas state because of violent crime.

"You probably don't want to go to one of these border cities" because cartels "contest these ports of entry pretty heavily and fight for their economic control," Ballard said.

When it comes to the "do not travel to warning," Jean-Pierre said, "We've been very clear about that. The State Department, again, has put that out. We urge Americans to read these alerts before traveling."

Popular tourist spots like Quintana Roo, Nayarit and Mexico City have warnings of "exercised increased caution when traveling to" and Jalisco, where Puerto Vallarta is, has a "reconsider travel to." Travelers can "exercise normal precautions" when traveling to Yucatan, which includes the popular attraction Chichén Itzá.

How likely is it to encounter cartel violence? 

"I don’t think anyone can ensure 100% clearance on (avoiding cartel violence), unfortunately. We know that Mexico has been plagued by drug violence, and cartels are in many parts of the country, just as in other nations," said Vanessa Karel, a Latinx entrepreneur who founded Greether , a travel startup that helps women travel with fewer risks. 

"However, it is well documented that some areas have a higher presence of violence. Please do your due diligence on which areas these are," she said. Steer clear of these areas and avoid taking part in anything drug-related, Karel advised. 

Ballard agreed and offered this analogy: "Getting struck by lightning is a really rare occurrence, but if you are standing on top of a tree in a thunderstorm, those odds go up. That's how I view being in and around some of these higher-risk cities in Mexico, the border cities."

Getting caught in cartel activity is less common somewhere like Cancun than it is in Colima.

Because Mexico's economy heavily depends on tourism dollars, cartels "tend to stay away from harming or hurting Americans because they know the response would be pretty severe," Ballard said.

The Mexican government has also implemented several initiatives to maintain safety in high-tourist areas, like deploying tourist police forces to high-traffic visitor areas. These officers are easy to spot and usually speak English.

"Travelers will have fewer risks by staying at highly rated hotels, areas and booking tour guides to show them around," Karel said. 

Should people be worried about being kidnapped in Mexico?

Being "in the wrong place at the wrong time" is the main risk for Americans and cartel activity, Ballard said. It's rare for Americans to be kidnapped by cartels for ransom.

He does warn of occasional "express kidnappings," which happen not just in Mexico but in other countries too. In this situation, a tourist who is likely drunk and wandering around downtown gets kidnapped, driven around to ATMs and forced to withdraw money. Usually, they end up being let go. 

As long as you stay in resort areas and use common sense, it should be relatively easy to keep safe. 

Check out USA TODAY's 17 travel safety tips from the CIA .

What should you do if you witness or encounter cartel crime? 

If you do witness or encounter cartel crime such as an express kidnapping or carjacking, Ballard said, you should report the case to the U.S. Embassy or to the local equivalent of 911. "You definitely want to have a record of something like that out there." Unfortunately, response times can be slow depending on where you are, he said. 

According to the State Department , if something happens, you'll probably be relying on local resources. 

Global Guardian clients, he pointed out, have a 24/7 panic button on the Global Guardian app, which will connect users to a safe haven, like a hospital. 

In some cases, he said, your response depends on the situation, and it may be best to cooperate. 

Top safety tips

Karel's top rule for traveling to Mexico is "to plan on going to places that are designed for you to go. If you are trying to visit an area that not even locals feel comfortable going to, don't attempt it, and please, simply avoid it," she said. 

She also advised people to have situational awareness. "We are concerned that travelers going to Mexico think they can go just about anywhere, especially when they don’t blend as a local," she said. Visitors "should be aware of how much they stand out and how little or how much they know about the area they are going to."

Here are some other safety tips when traveling in Mexico:

  • Travel during daylight hours and avoid walking around unknown areas, especially at night.
  • Don't walk around with jewelry or your head down looking at your phone because that makes you an easy target to get robbed, Ballard said. 
  • "Please ask trustworthy travel businesses and, most importantly, check travel advisories and what the tourism boards say. T they are there for a reason, and a lot of us are fighting to make cities safer and more sustainable," Karel said.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program , a free service for U.S. travelers to receive safety alerts about their destination from the U.S. Embassy in real time.
  • Before departing on your trip to a high-risk area, the State Department recommended you share important documents and points of contact with someone at home, and create a communication plan if something were to happen. 
  • Share your location via your smartphone with someone at home while you are abroad. 
  • Consider purchasing travel insurance for kidnapping or ransom. Depending on the plan, it can cover ransom payments, emergency evacuation costs, and payment for any negotiations needed. 

Contributing: Michael Collins, USA TODAY

Kathleen Wong is a travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Hawaii. You can reach her at [email protected]

This Map Shows Where Americans Are Being Told ‘Do Not Travel’ in Mexico

T he State Department issued new travel warnings for parts of Mexico on Wednesday, advising American travelers to entirely avoid five regions due to crime.

The advisory tells Americans “do not travel” to the five Mexican coastal states of Sinaloa, Colima, Michoacán, Guerrero, and Tamaulipas. It also suggests exercising “increased caution” or “reconsider travel” to other parts of the country.

Here’s a map of Mexico’s five states the U.S. deemed most dangerous, as well as the general warnings across the rest of the country. The State Department gave Mexico a level 2 travel warning overall, encouraging travelers to exercise increased caution in general.

do not travel map of mexico

“Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread,” the advisory states.

The latest advisory gives the five Mexican states the same warning level as risky travel destinations like Syria, Yemen and Somalia.

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Watch CBS News

Is it safe to travel to Mexico? Here's what you need to know

March 10, 2023 / 2:04 PM EST / CNN

By Marnie Hunter, CNN

The kidnapping and killing of US travelers this week in the Mexican city of Matamoros, just over the border from Brownsville, Texas, has put a glaring spotlight on violence in a country that millions of international visitors flock to each year.

And as spring break gets under way in popular beach resorts hundreds of miles away in the country's west and south, the question of safety is likely top of mind.

Here's what to know about travel safety in Mexico:

Travel warnings There are 32 states in Mexico, and the US State Department has "do not travel" advisories in place for six, including Tamaulipas state, where Matamoros is located.

Zachary Rabinor, founder and CEO of travel company Journey Mexico, points out that this week's violence happened far from some of the most sought-after tourist destinations in Mexico, in a state that has long held a US State Department "do not travel" warning.

"To put things in perspective, Matamoros is about 1,360 miles away from Cancun; that's about the equivalent distance from the Texas side of the border to Chicago, Illinois," said Rabinor, whose company creates tailored luxury trips.

Seven Mexican states are listed one tier down in the State Department's "reconsider travel" category and 17 are listed under "exercise increased caution."

Mexico travel advisory

 "Crime and kidnapping" is listed as the cause for advisories in some states in each of those three categories, including Tamaulipas. The rest of the advisories list "crime" as the reason to either not travel, reconsider or exercise caution.

"Exercise normal precautions" is the guidance for the states of Campeche and Yucatán on the Yucatán Peninsula.

Countries including Canada and the United Kingdom also have detailed travel warnings related to Mexico.

Situational awareness wherever you go Playa del Carmen and Cancún, which are welcoming an influx of spring break travelers, are located in the state of Quintana Roo, where the State Department advises travelers to "exercise increased caution due to crime and kidnapping."

Rabinor highlighted other popular destinations carrying the "exercise increased caution" advisory, including France and the Bahamas. France receives the caution because of possible terrorism and civil unrest. Crime is listed as the reason for caution in the Bahamas.

The State Department notes in its Quintana Roo advisory that violence and criminal activity may occur anywhere, "including in popular tourist destinations."

"Travelers should maintain a high level of situational awareness, avoid areas where illicit activities occur, and promptly depart from potentially dangerous situations," the advisory warns.

Those popular resort areas are still reasonably safe, says Jaime Lopez-Aranda, who is a senior security manager at travel risk management firm International SOS.

"It is relatively safe for travelers to head to tourist destinations and major urban centers such as Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey," Lopez-Aranda told CNN Travel.

Lopez-Aranda lives in Mexico City, where petty crime is a persistent risk and precautions should be taken, he said, "but the most popular locations are relatively safe for all kinds of travelers."

Journey Mexico has more than 50 employees based in the country who are always monitoring for potential risk, Rabinor said.

"We are confident that with proper preparation and information, travel to and within Mexico continues to be a great option," he said.

If January's international flight arrivals are any indication, the risks associated with travel to parts of Mexico aren't keeping visitors away from the country as a whole.

Passenger arrivals on international flights were up by 13% in January compared with January 2019, before the pandemic took hold around the world.

Precautions and planning Caution and situational awareness are key all over the country -- and the world for that matter.

For travel in Mexico, Lopez-Aranda says precautions could include: • Traveling with a trusted driver in a private vehicle • Traveling only in daylight hours outside urban centers or in higher-risk locations • Avoiding trouble spots in major cities • Avoiding traveling alone • Staying up-to-date through news and government alerts • Making sure your mobile device is charged

All of those tips are measures to take at a destination, but much of the work that goes into ensuring the safest possible trip happens before anything is even booked.

You'll want to research the security and medical risks of destinations you're considering and make sure that you have confidence in your accommodations, transport, means of communication and security arrangements, says Lopez-Aranda.

"It is important that you share all plans with friends and family at home. While traveling, you should also keep constant communication to ensure safety and discuss any potential risks that may arise," he says.

And you should have copies of your documents, contact information for your country's embassy or consulate and the location of the closest hospital with you. Insurance that covers you in your destination is also key.

Trust your gut Journey Mexico links to the US State Department advisories on its website, as well as travel guidance for the citizens of other countries including the United Kingdom and Australia.

The company also notes conflicts between rival criminal organizations in various areas of Mexico in its own "Is Mexico Safe?" safety assessment.

"Though these conflicts can be unpredictable, they are almost always among and between organized crime groups" and are very rare in tourist areas, the posting says.

The site also includes precautions travelers can take to avoid pickpocketing or robbery, including using ATMs only in secure locations, hiring reputable private transportation, not wearing expensive jewelry and avoiding deserted, unlit areas.

If you're uncomfortable, try to get away from the situation or environment immediately, says Lopez-Aranda.

Because "intuition is often right."

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Mexico travel advice

Latest updates: The Health section was updated - travel health information (Public Health Agency of Canada)

Last updated: January 22, 2024 12:19 ET

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Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, mexico - exercise a high degree of caution.

Exercise a high degree of caution in Mexico due to high levels of criminal activity and kidnapping.

Guerrero - Avoid all travel

This advisory excludes the cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco, where you should exercise a high degree of caution.

Regional Advisory - Avoid non-essential travel

  • all Chihuahua
  • all Colima, except the city of Manzanillo
  • all Coahuila, except the southern part of the state at and below the Saltillo-Torreón highway corridor
  • all Durango, except Durango City
  • Highway 45 between León and Irapuato
  • the area south of and including Highway 45D between Irapuato and Celaya
  • all Michoacán, except the city of Morelia
  • the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas
  • the municipality of Xoxocotla
  • the area within 20 km of the border with Sinaloa and Durango
  • the city of Tepic
  • all Nuevo León, except the city of Monterrey
  • all Sinaloa, except the city of Mazatlán
  • all Sonora, except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos and Puerto Peñasco
  • all Tamaulipas
  • all Zacatecas

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Deteriorating security situation in Guerrero State

Hurricane Otis struck Guerrero State on October 25, 2023. The security situation remains volatile and unpredictable after the storm. Damage to transportation and communications networks have left many towns and cities isolated, increasing the risk of criminal and gang activity.

Certain areas are particularly affected by banditry and violence, including:

  • the highway between Acapulco and Zihuantanejo
  • the highway between Acapulco to Chilpancingo

You should avoid all travel to Guerrero State. If you are in Guerrero despite the advisory, you should take necessary precautions to ensure your safety, including:

  • avoid travelling alone or after dark
  • exercise extreme vigilance
  • monitor local media for the latest updates on the situation
  • follow the instructions of local authorities

Levels of crime, particularly violent crime, are high throughout Mexico. Arrest and detention rates are low and don’t deter criminal activity.

Criminal groups, including drug cartels, are very active. ‎Clashes between cartels or gangs over territory, drugs and smuggling routes are common.

In some parts of the country, military, navy and federal police forces have been deployed to combat organized crime and improve security conditions. They maintain a visible presence by:

  • patrolling the streets
  • setting up roadblocks
  • conducting random vehicle checks  

If you plan on travelling to Mexico:

  • remain vigilant at all times
  • stay in tourist areas
  • be very cautious on major highways
  • avoid travelling at night
  • monitor local media closely

If you’re the victim of a crime, you must report it immediately to local authorities. No criminal investigation is possible without a formal complaint. Complaints must be made in person before leaving Mexico. You should hire a local lawyer to represent your interests and follow up on your case after you return to Canada. Failure to do may result in incomplete investigations or long delays in bringing cases to trial.

Violent crime

There are high rates of violent crime, such as homicides, kidnappings, carjacking and assaults, including in popular tourist destinations such as the Mayan Riviera (Cancún, Playa del Carmen, Puerto Morelos and Tulum), and Acapulco.

Criminal groups and drug cartels are present in tourist areas. Inter-gang and cartel fighting has taken place in restaurants, hotels and nightclubs frequented by tourists.

Innocent bystanders have been injured or killed. You may be in the wrong place at the wrong time and become a victim of violent crime.

Border areas often see higher criminal activity and violence, including in rural areas. Confrontations between organized criminal groups and Mexican authorities continue to pose a risk. Shootouts, attacks and illegal roadblocks may occur without warning.

You should travel to Mexico by air to avoid international land border crossings, particularly along the border with the United States, in the following cities:

  • Ciudad Juárez
  • Nuevo Laredo

If crossing an international land border:

  • remain extremely vigilant
  • use only official border crossings

Armed robbery

Armed robbery occurs. Foreigners have been targets of robberies that sometimes involve assault.

Robbers will follow a victim after they exchange or withdraw money at airports, currency exchange bureaus ( casas de cambio ) or ATMs.

  • Stay in hotels and resorts with good security
  • If you are threatened by robbers, stay calm and don’t resist
  • Avoid withdrawing or exchanging money in public areas of the airport

Canadian travellers have been physically and sexually assaulted. In some cases, hotel employees, taxi drivers and security personnel at popular tourist destinations were involved. In some cases, hotel staff are not helpful and try to dissuade victims from pursuing the incident with police.

  • Avoid walking after dark, especially alone
  • Avoid isolated or deserted areas
  • Avoid excessive alcohol consumption

Are you a victim of sexual violence? – Government of Canada and British Embassy Mexico City

Credit card and ATM fraud

Credit card and ATM fraud occurs in Mexico. When using debit or credit cards:

  • pay careful attention when others are handling your cards
  • use ATMs located in public areas or inside a bank or business
  • avoid using card readers with an irregular or unusual feature
  • cover the keypad with one hand when entering your PIN
  • check for any unauthorized transactions on your account statements

Overcharging

Some bars and nightclubs may try to charge exorbitant prices. Discussions about overcharging may lead to threats of violence and security guards may force you to pay. Avoid running a tab or leaving your credit card with bar or restaurant staff.

Overseas fraud

Police officers

Legitimate police officers have extorted money from tourists or arrested tourists for minor offences such as :

  • drinking alcohol on the street
  • urinating on public roads
  • traffic violations

They have requested immediate cash payment in exchange for their release. Travellers driving rental cars have been targeted.

If this occurs:

  • don’t hand over your money or your passport
  • ask for the officer’s name, badge and patrol car number
  • ask for a copy of the written fine, which is payable at a later date, or insist on going to the nearest police station

Virtual kidnappings

Extortion, including virtual kidnappings, is the third most common crime in Mexico. Criminals use a variety of tactics to gather information about potential victims for extortion purposes, including using social media sites or eavesdropping on conversations

In a virtual kidnapping, criminals contact the victim’s hotel room landline and threaten the victim to stay in their room. The criminals then instruct the victim to provide information needed for the caller to use to contact family and friends, to demand the immediate payment of ransom for their release.

  • Don't discuss travel plans, your room number or any other personal information around strangers
  • Never leave your cellphone unattended
  • Ensure your cellphone is password protected
  • Don't divulge personal business details to strangers in person or over the phone or on social media, especially when using hotel phones
  • If you're threatened on the phone or hear screams, hang up immediately
  • When you answer the phone, wait for the caller to speak. If the caller asks who is speaking, hang up immediately.
  • Don’t answer unrecognized or blocked phone numbers
  • Don’t answer hotel landlines

Kidnappings

Mexico has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world. Kidnapping, including virtual and express kidnapping, is a serious security risk throughout Mexico.

Kidnappers target all classes. Canadian citizens and contractors working for Canadian businesses have been kidnapped, mostly in areas that are not under the control of police and security forces.

If you're kidnapped:

  • comply with the kidnappers’ requests
  • don’t attempt to resist

Express kidnappings

Express kidnappings occur in large urban areas. This is a method of kidnapping where criminals ask for a small and immediate ransom.

Thieves most commonly work in cooperation with, or pose as, taxi drivers. They force victims to use their debit or credit card to withdraw money from ATMs in exchange for their release.

  • Use only a reputable taxi company or a trusted ride-sharing app
  • Book taxis through your hotel or an authorized taxi stand ( sitio )

Petty theft

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, is common in Mexico.

  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times, even in areas normally considered safe
  • Ensure that your belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • Avoid showing signs of affluence, such as flashy jewellery, cell phones, headphones and designer bags
  • Carry only small amounts of money
  • Be cautious when withdrawing cash from ATMs

Home break-ins

Tourists staying in rental homes have been the victims of break-ins and burglaries. Whether you're staying in private or commercial accommodations, make sure you lock windows and doors securely.

Women’s safety

Women travelling alone may be subject to some forms of harassment and verbal abuse.

Some incidents of assault, rape and sexual assault against Canadian women have occurred, including at beach resorts and on public buses. 

  • Exercise caution when dealing with strangers or recent acquaintances
  • Be wary of rides or other invitations

Advice for women travellers

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances. These items may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Unregulated alcohol

Some bars, restaurants and resorts have served counterfeit alcohol. Some travellers have reported getting sick or blacking out after drinking alcohol.

  • Be cautious if you choose to drink alcohol
  • Seek medical assistance if you begin to feel sick

Alcohol, drugs and travel

Height standards for balcony railings in Mexico can be considerably lower than those in Canada. Falls have resulted in deaths and injuries.

  • Exercise caution when standing close to balcony railings

Demonstrations

Demonstrations take place regularly throughout the country. Protests and roadblocks are common in:

  • Mexico City, including to and from the airport
  • the states of Chiapas, Guerrero, Michoacán and Oaxaca

Such incidents may last a long time, leading to shortages of fresh food, medicine and gasoline.

Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Water activities

Coastal waters can be dangerous. Riptides are common. Several drownings occur each year.

Many beaches don’t offer warnings of dangerous conditions and they don’t always have lifeguards on duty.

Rescue services may not be consistent with international standards.

  • Consult local residents and tour operators for information on possible hazards and safe swimming areas
  • Always obey warning flags at beaches
  • Follow the instructions and warnings of local authorities

Water sports

Tour operators may not adhere to international standards. Many operators don’t conduct regular safety checks on their sporting and aquatic equipment.

Also, Canadians have been involved in accidents where operators of recreational vehicles, such as watercraft, have demanded compensation exceeding the value of the damage caused to the vehicle or equipment.

If you undertake water sports, such as diving:

  • choose a well-established and reputable company that has insurance
  • ensure that your travel insurance covers the recreational activities you choose
  • wear the appropriate safety equipment, such as helmets and life jackets
  • ensure that equipment is available and in good condition
  • don’t consume alcohol before the activity

If in doubt concerning the safety of the facilities or equipment, don’t use them.

Water safety abroad

Adventure tourism  

Outdoor activities, such as white water rafting, kayaking, scuba diving, snorkelling, bungee, zip lining, paragliding, hiking, mountain biking, etc and other adventure activities can be dangerous if unprepared. Trails are not always marked, and weather conditions can change rapidly, even during summer.  

Tour operators may not always adhere to international safety standards. 

If you intend to practice adventure tourism: 

  • consider hiring an experienced guide from a reputable company 
  • obtain detailed information on your activity and on the environment in which you will be setting out  
  • buy travel insurance that includes helicopter rescue and medical evacuation   
  • know the symptoms of acute altitude sickness, which can be fatal  
  • pay attention to the symptoms of dehydration and heatstroke, both of which can be fatal  
  • avoid venturing off marked trails  
  • ensure that you’re adequately equipped and bring sufficient water   
  • stay informed about weather and other conditions that may pose a hazard  
  • refrain from using facilities or equipment if you have doubts on their safety  
  • inform a family member or friend of your itinerary  

Road travel

Road conditions and road safety.

Road conditions and road safety can vary greatly throughout the country.

Road conditions can be dangerous due to:

  • sharp curves
  • poorly marked or hidden road signs
  • construction sites
  • roaming livestock
  • slow-moving or abandoned vehicles

Toll highways are typically safer and better maintained than secondary highways.

Mexican driving styles are very different from those in Canada. Many drivers don’t respect traffic laws, and police don’t strictly enforce these laws. Drivers often drive at excessive speeds and may be aggressive or reckless. Drinking and driving laws are not strictly enforced. Accidents causing fatalities are common. Police don’t regularly patrol the highways.

Roadblocks and checkpoints

Illegal roadblocks and demonstrations are common. Heavily armed gangs have attacked travellers on intercity highways. Criminals especially target sport utility vehicles and full-size pickup trucks for theft and carjacking.

The military searches for drugs and firearms at military checkpoints throughout the country.

  • Avoid road travel at night between cities throughout the country
  • Ensure that you only stop in major centres, at reputable hotels or at secure campsites
  • Keep your car doors locked and the windows closed, especially at traffic lights
  • Avoid hitchhiking which is not a common practice in Mexico
  • Don’t leave valuables in the vehicle
  • Rent cars that don’t have stickers or other advertisements for the rental company on them, as rental cars have been targets for robbery, sometimes using force
  • Ensure operators provide insurance and helmets if renting scooters
  • Travel on toll roads to lower the risk of targeted roadblocks and robberies
  • Never attempt to cross roadblocks, even if they appear unattended

Public transportation

Remain vigilant in airports, at bus stations, on buses and on the metro.

The Mexico City metro is often very crowded and a popular place for pickpocketing. There are metro cars dedicated to women and children during rush hours. They are located at the front of the trains.

The Metrobus in Mexico City, which has dedicated lanes and stops, is relatively safe. There are sections dedicated to women and children at the front of the buses.

The “colectivos” and “pesero” mini-buses that stop when hailed are frequently targeted for robbery.

When travelling to other cities, use bus companies that offer VIP or executive class transportation. These buses only travel on toll roads, which lower the risks of targeted roadblocks and robberies, and follow a speed limit.

Taxis and ridesharing services

Disputes between taxi and ridesharing application drivers may occur, especially in Quintana Roo. They may result in:

  • altercations

Although tourists have not been targeted, you may be caught up in these incidents and harassed or injured. 

In Mexico City, all government-authorized taxis have licence plates starting with “A” or “B.” Taxis from designated stands have both the logo of their company and the plate number stamped on the side of the car. Official taxis in Mexico City are pink and white. Users can validate the pink and white taxis on the CDMX app.

  • Avoid hailing taxis on the street
  • Don't share taxis with strangers

When arriving at an airport in Mexico, pre-pay the taxi fare at the airport (inside or outside the terminal) and ask to see the driver’s official identification. You can also use a ridesharing app to arrange for a pickup at certain airports. Not all airports in Mexico allow ridesharing service pickups.

If you use a trusted ridesharing app, confirm the driver’s identity and the licence plate before getting in the car.

Mi Taxi  – CDMX app (in Spanish)

Cruise ship travel

Plan carefully if you plan to take a cruise departing from or stopping in Mexico.

Advice for cruise travellers

Pirate attacks and armed robbery against ships occur in coastal waters of the Bay of Campeche. Mariners should take appropriate precautions.

Live piracy report  - International Maritime Bureau

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Mexican authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for the expected duration of your stay in Mexico.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required Business visa: required Work visa: required Student visa: required

Required documents

To enter Mexico, you must present a valid passport and a duly completed tourist card (Multiple Immigration Form). Carry documents to prove the purpose of trip, such as hotel or tour booking confirmations, as immigration officers may request them.

Tourist card

You must obtain a tourist card to enter the country unless you stay in Mexico for less than 72 hours within the northern border zone. 

If you don’t obtain a tourist card upon arrival, you may face:

It is highly recommended to keep your digital tourist card, or tourist card if entered by land, with you at all times as proof of your legal stay in Mexico. You may be asked to show it to Mexican officials when exiting the country or if you are stopped on an immigration check point.

If you are stopped at an immigration check point and you are unable to prove your legal stay, you may be fined, detained or expelled from the country.

Entering by land

If entering Mexico by land, you must stop at the immigration office located at the border to obtain a tourist card, even if not explicitly directed by Mexican officials. Immigration officials will write down on your tourist card the number of days you are allowed to stay in Mexico.  

You may complete the tourist card form online before your arrival. However, you must print the form and present it to the migration official at the port of entry.

Multiple Immigration Form  - Government of Mexico

Entering by air

If entering Mexico by air, you are advised to download your tourist card issued by Mexican officials upon entry.

Depending on your airport of entry:

  • the immigration official will stamp your passport and note the number of days you are allowed to spend in Mexico or
  • you will go through an E-gate kiosk where you will scan your passport and self-register your entry in the country. Only use this option if you are entering Mexico as a tourist.

Once in the country, whether you entered via a E-gate or not, you will be able to access the digital tourist card online. You have 60 days to download it.

If you are unable to show your tourist card or digital tourist card upon departure, you will have to pay for a replacement at the immigration office of any international airport before boarding.

Make sure to plan sufficient time at the airport to obtain a new card in time for your flight.

Portal access for digital tourist card  - Government of Mexico

Length of stay

An immigration official will determine the number of days you can remain in Mexico and note it on your tourist card. The maximum length granted for a tourism-related trip is 180 days; the maximum number of days is not granted by default.

If you're seeking the maximum number of days, you may be required to:

  • explain the purpose of your trip to the immigration official
  • provide details about your trip (accommodations, funds, return flight, etc.)

You won’t be able to request an extension or change the condition of your stay from inside the country.

Canadians travelling to the northern border zone (within 21 kilometres of the U.S. border) for work don’t require a visa for stays of 72 hours or less.

If you require a business or work visa, you should take care of the process yourself. If a prospective employer is processing your visa for you:

  • obtain copies of all correspondence between the employer and Mexican immigration authorities
  • verify that these copies are stamped by the immigration authorities as proof that your papers are being processed
  • request a receipt from your employer for any document that you provide for purposes of obtaining the visa
  • avoid surrendering your passport to your employer

Volunteer, religious, research and eco-tourism activities

You may not be able to undertake volunteer, religious/missionary, research or certain forms of eco-tourism activities while visiting as a tourist. Contact the Mexican Embassy or closest Mexican consulate for information the type of visa required for these activities.

Tourism tax

Most visitors to Mexico must pay a tourism tax.

This fee is normally included in airline ticket prices. Visitors arriving by road or sea will have to pay this fee at any bank in Mexico. There is a bank representative at every port of entry. The bank receipt must be attached to the tourist card for submission at departure.

You don't have to pay this tax if:

  • you're entering by land for tourism purposes, and your stay will not exceed 7 days
  • you're travelling to the northern border zone for less than 72 hours
  • you're travelling to Mexico on a cruise ship

Dual citizenship

If entering and leaving Mexico as a dual citizen, you must identify yourself as a Mexican citizen. You must carry valid passports for both countries.

Laws about dual citizenship

Criminal records

Canadians with a criminal record or a warrant for arrest may be refused entry and returned to Canada or to a third country on the next available flight.

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 31 August, 2023
  • Zika virus: Advice for travellers - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 31 August, 2023
  • Mpox (monkeypox): Advice for travellers - 4 January, 2024
  • Dengue: Advice for travellers - 22 January, 2024

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Malaria  is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that is caused by parasites spread through the bites of mosquitoes.   There is a risk of malaria in certain areas and/or during a certain time of year in this destination. 

Antimalarial medication may be recommended depending on your itinerary and the time of year you are travelling. Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic before travelling to discuss your options. It is recommended to do this 6 weeks before travel, however, it is still a good idea any time before leaving.    Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times:  • Cover your skin and use an approved insect repellent on uncovered skin.  • Exclude mosquitoes from your living area with screening and/or closed, well-sealed doors and windows. • Use insecticide-treated bed nets if mosquitoes cannot be excluded from your living area.  • Wear permethrin-treated clothing.    If you develop symptoms similar to malaria when you are travelling or up to a year after you return home, see a health care professional immediately. Tell them where you have been travelling or living. 

In this destination, rabies is carried by dogs and some wildlife, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. While travelling, take precautions , including keeping your distance from animals (including free-roaming dogs), and closely supervising children.

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. Rabies treatment is often available in this destination. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who are at high risk of exposure (e.g., occupational risk such as veterinarians and wildlife workers, children, adventure travellers and spelunkers, and others in close contact with animals). 

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Travellers' diarrhea is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

Risk of developing travellers' diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.

The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Typhoid   is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among children, travellers going to rural areas, travellers visiting friends and relatives or those travelling for a long period of time.

Travellers visiting regions with a risk of typhoid, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation, should speak to a health care professional about vaccination.  

Salmonellosis is a common illness among travellers to this country. It can be spread through contaminated food or beverages, such as raw or undercooked poultry and eggs, as well as fruits or vegetables.

Practice safe food and water precautions . This includes only eating food that is properly cooked and still hot when served.

Pregnant women, children under 5 years of age, those over 60 years of age, and those with weakened immune systems are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill.

Cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella have been reported among Canadian travellers returning from Mexico. These strains of Salmonella do not respond to some of the recommended antibiotics if treatment is needed.

Most people recover on their own without medical treatment and from proper rehydration (drinking lots of fluids).

  • Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Travellers with severe symptoms should consult a health care professional as soon as possible.

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

There is a risk of chikungunya in this country.  The risk may vary between regions of a country.  Chikungunya is a virus spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. Chikungunya can cause a viral disease that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. In some cases, the joint pain can be severe and last for months or years.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites at all times. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

  • In this country,   dengue  is a risk to travellers. It is a viral disease spread to humans by mosquito bites.
  • Dengue can cause flu-like symptoms. In some cases, it can lead to severe dengue, which can be fatal.
  • The level of risk of dengue changes seasonally, and varies from year to year. The level of risk also varies between regions in a country and can depend on the elevation in the region.
  • Mosquitoes carrying dengue typically bite during the daytime, particularly around sunrise and sunset.
  • Protect yourself from mosquito bites . There is no vaccine or medication that protects against dengue.

Zika virus   is a risk in this country.

Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus can cause   serious birth defects .

Pregnant women and women planning a pregnancy should   visit a health care professional   before travelling to discuss the potential risks of travelling to this country. Pregnant women may choose to avoid or postpone travel to this country.

Travel recommendations:

  • Prevent mosquito bites   at all times.
  • If you are pregnant, always use condoms correctly or avoid sexual contact with anyone who has travelled to this country for the duration of your pregnancy.
  • Women:   Wait 2 months after travel to this country or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer) before trying for a pregnancy. If your male partner travelled with you, wait 3 months after travel or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer).
  • Men:   Wait 3 months after travel to this country or after onset of illness due to Zika virus (whichever is longer) before trying for a pregnancy.

For more travel recommendations, see the travel health notice:  Zika virus: Advice for travellers

American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease)   is a risk in this country. It is caused by a parasite spread by infected triatomine bugs. The infection can be inactive for decades, but humans can eventually develop complications causing disability and even death.

Risk is generally low for most travellers. Protect yourself from triatomine bugs, which are active at night, by using mosquito nets if staying in poorly-constructed housing. There is no vaccine available for Chagas disease.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

The quality of care varies greatly throughout the country.

Good health care is available in private hospitals and clinics, but it’s generally expensive. Most private facilities won’t agree to deal directly with medical insurance companies and will require payment with a credit card in advance or a bank transfer/direct deposit.

Mental health services are extremely limited in Mexico, particularly outside of Mexico City. Services and treatment standards may differ substantially from those in Canada.

Medical evacuation can be very expensive and you may need it in case of serious illness or injury.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Medical tourism

Medical tourism is common in Mexico. Canadian travellers have had serious health complications following cosmetic or other elective surgeries abroad.

Before leaving for medical travel, you should do your research, especially on:

  • the health and financial risks
  • the medical facility where the procedure will be performed
  • language barriers, which can lead to misunderstandings about your medical care and conditions
  • travel insurance that includes coverage for the type of medical procedure you will be undergoing

You should discuss your medical plans with your primary healthcare provider in Canada before travelling. Most provincial and territorial health care programs are extremely limited in their coverage offered abroad.

  • Make sure that the healthcare providers you choose are authorized by the Mexican health authorities
  • Ask to see the credentials of the healthcare providers
  • Obtain a written agreement detailing the proposed treatment or procedure
  • Receiving medical care outside Canada
  • If you become sick or injured while travelling outside Canada or after your return
  • Medical tourism – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)

If you take prescription medication, you’re responsible for determining their legality in Mexico. 

  • Bring sufficient quantities of your medication with you
  • Always keep your medication in the original container
  • Pack your medication in your carry-on luggage
  • Carry a copy of your prescriptions

Medication cannot be sent to Mexico from Canada via courier services.

Many types of medication—both over-the-counter and prescription—are readily available with little oversight. Counterfeit medication is common in certain parts of Mexico. If you need to purchase medication while in Mexico, make sure to get it from a reputable location.

Federal Commission for protection against sanitary risk  (in Spanish)

Air quality in Mexico City

In Mexico City, you may experience health problems caused by high altitude or by air pollution, which is at its peak during the winter months.

Consult your doctor before booking your trip if you have lung, heart or respiratory problems.

Death in Mexico

If you plan to retire or spend long periods of time in Mexico, or travel there for medical procedures, you should:

  • share your plans or wishes with relatives
  • make sure important documents can easily be located
  • make arrangements in case of your death while in the country
  • What if I Die in Mexico? – Fact sheet
  • Death Abroad Factsheet

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Penalties for breaking the law in Mexico can be more severe than in Canada, even for similar offences.

Foreign nationals are often held in pre-trial detention and there can be lengthy delays before a trial.

Many petty crimes (such as public urination, failure to pay a bill or disorderly behaviour) can result in a 72-hour detention by police. Paying a fine can secure an early release from detention.

Detention conditions are below the standards of Canadian prisons.

  • Overview of the criminal law system in Mexico
  • Arrest and detention

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy prison sentences.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Smoking is prohibited in all public places except for clearly marked designated smoking areas. This includes but is not limited to:

  • restaurants

You may be fined if you’re caught smoking in public.

Electronic cigarettes

It’s illegal to bring electronic cigarettes/vaping devices and solutions into Mexico.

You could have these items confiscated by customs officials if you have them in your possession. You could also be fined or detained.

It is strictly prohibited to sell or distribute these devices and solutions in Mexico.

Imports and exports

The Mexican government strictly enforces its laws concerning possession, importation and trafficking of firearms.

Anyone entering Mexico with a firearm or ammunition without prior written authorization from Mexican authorities is subject to imprisonment.

It is also illegal to enter the country with certain types of knives.

Importing vehicles and boats

Mexico has very strict rules regarding the importation of foreign vehicles and boats.

You must enter Mexico with the proper import permit and insurance, since it cannot be obtained once you are in Mexico. You may face a fine and have your vehicle seized if you enter Mexico without the proper permit.

You must present a paper document of your vehicle registration to obtain a vehicle importation permit from the Mexican authorities. If you present a digital document of your vehicle registration, your vehicle may be refused entry into Mexico.   

  • Vehicle importation  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Temporary vehicle import application system  – Banjército
  • Travelling to Mexico by land  – Mexican Embassy in Canada

Cigarettes and alcohol

If you are older than 18, you are allowed to bring into Mexico up to:

  • 10 cigarette packs
  • 25 cigars or
  • 200 grams of tobacco
  • 3 litres of alcohol and
  • 6 litres of wine

If you bring more alcohol and cigarettes into Mexico than allowed, even if you declare your imported items, you will be subject to a high import fee. You will still be subject to a significant fee if you decide to relinquish your imported items

It’s illegal to possess archaeological artefacts or to export such items from Mexico.

  • Goods you can bring to Mexico as part of your personal luggage  – Government of Mexico
  • Goods you cannot bring into Mexico  – Government of Mexico
  • Agricultural product restrictions  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)

Political activity

It’s illegal for foreigners to conduct political activity in Mexico, including participating in demonstrations.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers

Mexican law does not prohibit sexual acts between individuals of the same sex. However, homosexuality is not widely accepted in Mexican society, particularly in rural areas.

2SLGBTQI+ travellers could be discriminated against based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression or sex characteristics. Transgender and gender non-conforming individuals are disproportionately targeted for violence and can face discrimination.

Travel and your sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Mexico.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Mexico, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Mexico.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Mexico, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Mexican court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Mexico to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

There are no clear procedures or regulations about surrogacy in Mexico.

If you're considering surrogacy, seek advice from legal professionals knowledgeable in Canadian and Mexican laws and citizenship procedures.

Identity documents

The names on your identity documents must be identical to those on your birth certificate to obtain official Mexican documents, such as marriage certificates, immigration documents or passports.

Middle names are often left off Canadian identity documents. This has caused significant difficulties for many Canadians. If you plan on residing in Mexico or dealing with the Mexican Civil Registry, obtain a Canadian passport that will meet Mexican requirements.

Identification

You should carry photo identification.

Authorities can ask you to show identification and a proof of your legal status in Mexico. They can demand to see your tourist card at any time. You must carry the original at all times. You must carry the original at all times, and should also carry a photocopy of the identification page of your passport.

Investments

If you plan on buying property, or making other investments in Mexico, seek legal advice in Canada and in Mexico. Do so before making commitments. Related disputes could take time and be costly to resolve.

Mexican real estate agents are not licensed or regulated.

  • Choose your own lawyer
  • Avoid hiring a lawyer recommended by a seller

Problems with timeshare arrangements occur.

Timeshare representatives may be very persistent. They use pressure tactics and offer free tours, meals, gifts or alcoholic beverages.

It's illegal for timeshare companies to ask you to sign a waiver that prevents you from cancelling a contract. You're legally entitled to cancel a timeshare contract without penalty within 5 working days. Contracts must be cancelled in writing directly with the timeshare company.

Before purchasing a timeshare:

  • gather as much information as possible
  • review carefully the contract; anything not included in the contract will not be honoured
  • provide your credit card only if you are sure you want to make the purchase
  • keep copies of all correspondence

If you suspect a fraud in the real estate procedures, contact the Federal Attorney’s Office of Consumer immediately.

  • Federal Attorney’s Office of Consumer (PROFECO)  – Mexican Government (in Spanish)
  • Should I buy a timeshare in Mexico? - Embassy of Mexico in Canada
  • Should I sell my timeshare in Mexico? - Embassy of Mexico in Canada

Rental accommodations

Rental agreements between two individuals in Mexico are considered a private matter and are not regulated by the government.

If you encounter difficulties with a rental agreement, you must obtain the services of a Mexican lawyer.

You should carry an international driving permit.

International Driving Permit

Auto insurance

Mexican liability insurance is mandatory. Canadian automobile insurance is not valid in Mexico.

You can obtain insurance at the Mexican border. You should obtain full coverage, including coverage for legal assistance.

Automobile insurance is much more expensive in Mexico than in Canada. Many local drivers don’t have any form of car insurance.

If you’re involved in an accident, and you don’t have Mexican liability insurance, you could be prevented from leaving the country until all parties agree that adequate financial satisfaction has been received. If you’re found to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of an accident, or if you don’t have a valid driver’s licence, your insurance will be considered invalid.

If you’re involved in a traffic accident, you may face serious legal problems, including imprisonment. You could be taken into custody until responsibility for the accident is determined and all fines are paid. You must report any accident you’re involved in to the police.

Driving restrictions in Mexico City

The Hoy No Circula (No Driving Today) program restricts some cars from driving in Mexico City and in some municipalities of the State of Mexico, from Monday to Saturday, from 5 am to 10 pm.

You will face driving restrictions depending on:

  • your car’s emission sticker
  • the last digit of your license plate
  • where your license plate was issued

Hoy No Circula program is strictly enforced. You may face heavy fines and temporary confiscation of your vehicle if you don’t comply. Consult the Hoy No Circula calendar before driving.

Electric and hybrid cars are exempted from these restrictions. Gas-fueled cars of a 2008 model or later may obtain a tourist pass valid for selected drive days.

  • Hoy no circula – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Tourist pass  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Ministry of Environment  – Government of (in Spanish)

Buying/selling a vehicle

You must be either a temporary or a permanent resident if you wish to buy a car in Mexico.

It’s illegal to sell your imported vehicle in Mexico. If you do, your vehicle may be seized and you may be subject to a fine and deportation.

The currency of Mexico is the Mexican peso.

In some parts of Mexico, particularly tourist destinations, hotels and other service providers may advertise prices in USD.

There is a limit to the amount of U.S. dollars that residents and foreigners can exchange in Mexico, depending on your immigration status. The rule doesn’t apply to Canadian dollars but some financial institutions, hotels and currency exchange bureaus don’t make the distinction.

When carrying more than US$10,000 or the equivalent in other currencies, cash, cheques, money orders or any other monetary instrument, you must declare the amount exceeding US$10,000. Failure to make this declaration is against Mexican law and often results in detention.

Hurricane Otis

Hurricane Otis made landfall in Acapulco on October 25, 2023, causing significant damage to infrastructure. Avoid all travel to Guerrero state.

There are significant disruptions to the following essential services in Acapulco:

  • transportation, including flights
  • power distribution
  • water and food supply
  • telecommunications networks
  • emergency services
  • medical care, including hospitals.

Latest advisories  – U.S. National Hurricane centre

Mexico is subject to various natural disasters, such as:

  • earthquakes
  • volcanic eruptions
  • torrential rains, floods and mudslides
  • forest fires

In the event of a natural disaster:

  • monitor local news to stay informed on the evolving situation
  • follow the instructions of local authorities, including evacuation orders
  • Secretary of Integrated Risk Management and Civil Protection  – Government of Mexico City (in Spanish)
  • National Center for Disaster Prevention  (CENAPRED) – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Get prepared

Hurricane season

Hurricanes usually occur from mid-May to the end of November. During this period, even small tropical storms can quickly develop into major hurricanes.

These severe storms can put you at risk and hamper the provision of essential services.

If you decide to travel to a coastal area during the hurricane season:

  • know that you expose yourself to serious safety risks
  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities
  • Tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes, typhoons and monsoons
  • Large-scale emergencies abroad
  • Active storm tracking and hurricane watches and warnings  - United States’ National Hurricane Center

Flooding and landslides

Heavy rains can cause flooding and landslides. Roads may become impassable and infrastructure damaged.

Earthquakes and tsunamis

Mexico is located in an active seismic zone. Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions can occur.

A tsunami can occur within minutes of a nearby earthquake. However, the risk of tsunami can remain for several hours following the first tremor. If you’re staying on the coast, familiarize yourself with the region’s evacuation plans in the event of a tsunami warning.

Useful links:

  • National Seismological Institute  – Government of Mexico (in Spanish)
  • Latest earthquakes  - U.S. Geological Survey
  • Tsunami alerts  - U.S. Tsunami Warning System
  • Centre for Studies and Research of Volcanology  - University of Colima (in Spanish)

Forest fires may occur. The air quality in areas near active fires may deteriorate due to heavy smoke.

In case of a significant fire, stay away from affected areas, particularly if you suffer from respiratory ailments.

Local services

In case of an emergency, dial 911.

Roadside assistance

The Angeles Verdes is a highway patrol service that provides free assistance on all major toll highways from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

You can download the App on your mobile device.

In case of an emergency, you can also dial 078 or 800 006 8839 (toll-free in Mexico) to reach them.

Consular assistance

Aguascalientes, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Estado de Mexico, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Michoacán, Morelos, Mexico City, Oaxaca, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luís Potosí, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Zacatecas.

Campeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo north of the municipality of Solidaridad, including Puerto Morelos, Isla Mujeres and Holbox

Baja California, Sonora

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Mexico, in Mexico City, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

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U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Mexico

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Location:   Mexico

Event:   The U.S. Department of State updated the  Mexico Travel Advisory  and the  Mexico country information page  on August 22, 2023.  The Travel Advisory includes individual risk assessment levels for each state.

Actions to Take:

  • Read the  Mexico Travel Advisory , including the detailed state summaries and advisory levels for information on your specific travel destination.
  • Read the  Mexico country information page .

Assistance:

Contact Form

U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico

From Mexico: (55) 8526 2561

From the United States:  +1-844-528-6611

Department of State – Consular Affairs:  +1-888-407-4747 or +1-202-501-444

Mexico International Travel Information

U.S. Passports

Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

Traveler’s Checklist

Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter

U.S. Embassy Mexico City on  Facebook  and  Twitter

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Places the U.S. Government Warns Not to Travel Right Now

You may want to reconsider traveling to these countries right now.

Do Not Travel to These Countries

Man walking through an airport with his suitcase

(Getty Images)

Crime, civil unrest and terrorism are common risk factors for countries that end up on the State Department's "Do Not Travel" advisory list.

Global conflicts and climate crises , ranging from a series of coups across Africa to earthquakes and floods in catastrophe-prone countries, affected international travel patterns throughout 2023.

Still, international tourist arrivals reached 91% of pre-pandemic levels in the third quarter of 2023, according to estimates by the World Tourism Organization based on travel patterns through September. But some destinations warrant more caution than others. In December alone, about 6 million U.S. citizens left the country for international destinations, 16% higher than the same month in 2019, according to the International Trade Administration . But some destinations warrant more caution than others.

On Oct. 19, following the outbreak of war between Israel and Gaza and flaring tensions in the region, the U.S. State Department issued a worldwide caution advisory due to “increased tensions in various locations around the world, the potential for terrorist attacks, demonstrations or violent actions against U.S. citizens and interests.” Prior to this update, the most recent worldwide caution advisory was issued in 2022 after a U.S. strike killed Ayman al-Zawahiri, Osama bin Laden’s successor as leader of Al Qaeda, causing “a higher potential for anti-American violence.” The worldwide caution advisory remains in effect.

The U.S. State Department also issues individual travel advisory levels for more than 200 countries globally, continually updating them based on a variety of risk indicators such as health, terrorism and civil unrest. Travel advisory levels range from Level 1, which means exercise normal precautions, to Level 4, which means do not travel there.

About 10% of countries – 20 total – have a Level 4: “Do Not Travel” advisory as of Jan. 23. In Level 4 countries, the U.S. government may have “very limited ability” to step in should travelers’ safety or security be at risk, according to the State Department. Crime, civil unrest, kidnapping and terrorism are common risk factors associated with Level 4 countries.

So far in 2024, the State Department made changes to the existing Level 4 advisories for Myanmar, Iran and Gaza, and moved Niger off of the Level 4 list.

Places With a Level 4 Travel Advisory

These are the primary areas the U.S. government says not to travel to right now, in alphabetical order:

Jump to Place: Afghanistan Belarus Burkina Faso Central African Republic Myanmar (formerly Burma) Gaza Haiti Iran Iraq Libya Mali Mexico North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) Russia Somalia South Sudan Sudan Syria Ukraine Venezuela Yemen

Afghanistan: The Central Asian country is wrestling with “terrorism, risk of wrongful detention, kidnapping and crime,” according to the State Department. U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for wrongful detention and kidnapping. In 2022, the government reinstituted public floggings and executions, and women’s rights are disappearing under Taliban control. The U.S. Embassy in Kabul halted operations in August 2021. Since the Taliban took control , many forms of international aid have been halted . Meanwhile, in October 2023, some of the year’s deadliest earthquakes killed more than 2,400 in Afghanistan while the country continues to face a years-long extreme drought.

Belarus: Belarus, which shares a western border with Russia and a southern border with Ukraine, has been flagged for “Belarusian authorities’ continued facilitation of Russia’s war against Ukraine, the buildup of Russian military forces in Belarus, the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, the potential of civil unrest, the risk of detention, and the Embassy’s limited ability to assist U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Belarus.” The U.S. Embassy in Minsk halted operations in February 2022.

Burkina Faso: Terrorism, crime and kidnapping are plaguing this West African nation. Terrorist attacks may target hotels, restaurants and schools with little to no warning, and the East and Sahel regions of the country are under a state of emergency. In late November hundreds died in clashes between state security forces and rebels near the country’s border with Mali. More than 2 million people in Burkina Faso are displaced due to “violence linked to al-Qaida and the Islamic State group.”

Central African Republic: While there have not been specific incidents of U.S. citizens targeted with violence or crime, violent crime and sudden closure of roads and borders is common. The advisory states that “Embassy Bangui’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, crime, civil unrest, and kidnapping” is a factor in its assessment. Recent data from UNICEF suggests the country has the worst drinking water accessibility of all countries in 2022.

Myanmar (Formerly Burma): Armed conflict and civil unrest are the primary reasons to not travel to this Southeast Asian country, which experienced a military coup in early 2021. Limited health care resources, wrongful detentions and “areas with land mines and unexploded ordnance” are also listed as risk factors. After Ukraine and Israel, Myanmar had the highest conflict-related death toll in 2023.

Gaza : Hamas, a foreign terrorist organization as designated by the State Department, controls much of the Gaza Strip, which shares borders with both Israel and Egypt. On Oct. 7, 2023, Hamas fighters broke across the border into Israel, killing hundreds of civilians and soldiers in a brazen attack that stunned Israelis. On Oct. 10, Israel hit the Gaza Strip with “the fiercest air strikes in its 75-year conflict” according to Reuters . The conflict has since escalated into war between Israel and Hamas, with regular Israeli airstrikes leading to extensive civilian casualties in Gaza. As of mid-December, nearly 85% of Gaza’s population were displaced from their homes, according to UN estimates . The region continues to face shortages of food , water, electricity and medical supplies , with conditions deemed “far beyond a humanitarian crisis.” The State Department warns of terrorism and armed conflict within Gaza’s borders.

Haiti: In July 2023, the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince in response to the increased risk of kidnapping and violent crime in the country , as well as armed conflict between gangs and police. The travel advisory states that cases of kidnapping “often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings.” The travel advisory also states that “U.S. citizens in Haiti should depart Haiti as soon as possible” given “the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.” A series of gang attacks in late September 2023 caused thousands to flee their homes, and many aid groups have been forced to cut or suspend operations amid escalating violence in recent months.

Iran: Terrorism, kidnapping and civil unrest are risk factors for all travelers to Iran, while U.S. citizens are specifically at risk for “arbitrary arrest.” U.S.-Iranian nationals such as students, journalists and business travelers have been arrested on charges of espionage and threatening national security. Executions in Iran rose sharply between 2021 and 2022, bringing the country’s total to nearly 580 people over the year, according to a report by Amnesty International released in May 2023.

Iraq: The State Department cites “terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict [and] civil unrest” as cause for the country’s Level 4 distinction. Iraq’s northern borders, and its border with Syria, are especially dangerous. Since the escalation of conflict in neighboring Israel in October, there has been an increase in attacks against Iraqi military bases, which host U.S. troops and other international forces. On Oct. 20, non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members were ordered to leave the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Lebanon: Sitting on the Mediterranean Sea, Lebanon shares its northern border with Syria and its southern border with Israel, placing it in a region currently wrought with conflict . Following the outbreak of the Israel-Hamas war in early October, family members of U.S. government personnel and non-emergency personnel were authorized to leave the country, and the U.S. State Department raised Lebanon’s travel advisory level from a Level 3 to a Level 4 level due to “the unpredictable security situation related to rocket, missile, and artillery exchanges” between Israel and Hezbollah or other militant groups. On Dec. 19, the U.S. Embassy in Beirut returned to normal staffing and presence, but the country remains at Level 4 due to “crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest, kidnapping, and Embassy Beirut’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.” The country’s borders with Syria and with Israel, as well as refugee settlements within Lebanon, are specifically noted as Level 4 regions.

Libya: Following the end of its dictatorship over a decade ago, Libya has been wrought with internal conflict between armed groups in the East and West. Armed conflict, civil unrest, crime, kidnapping and terrorism are all risk factors. U.S. citizens have been targets of kidnapping for ransom, with terrorists targeting hotels and airports frequented by Westerners. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli halted operations in 2014. In mid-September 2023, floods, which some say were intensified by climate change , killed thousands in eastern Libya. Clashes between armed factions escalated across the country in the latter half of 2023, including in the capital city of Tripoli and in Benghazi.

Mali: After experiencing military coups in 2020 and 2021, crime, terrorism and kidnapping are all prevalent threats in this West African landlocked nation. In July 2022, non-emergency U.S. government employees and their families were ordered to leave the country due to higher risk of terrorist activity. A U.N. report in August 2023 said that military groups in the country, including both Mali security forces and possibly Russian Wagner mercenaries, were spreading terror through the use of violence against women and human rights abuses. Democratic elections were supposed to occur in February 2024, but Mali’s military junta postponed the plans indefinitely. In December, the U.N. officially ended a decade-long peacekeeping presence in the country, which had been among the agency’s deadliest missions, with hundreds of the mission personnel killed since 2013.

Mexico: Each state in Mexico is assessed separately for travel advisory levels. Six of the 32 states in Mexico are designated as Level 4: Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas. Crime and kidnapping are listed as the primary risk factors throughout the country. Nearly 112,000 people were missing across the country as of October, a number the U.N. has called “alarming.”

North Korea (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea): U.S. passports are not valid for travel “to, in, or through” this country, home to one of the world's longest-running dynastic dictatorships. The travel advisory states that the Level 4 distinction is due to “the continuing serious risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. nationals.” In July 2023, a U.S. soldier fled across the border into North Korea, where he is believed to be in North Korean custody, the first American detained in the North in nearly five years. He was returned to U.S. custody in September 2023.

Russia: The travel advisory for Russia cites its invasion of Ukraine , harassment of U.S. citizens by Russian government officials and arbitrary law enforcement as a few of the reasons for the Level 4 designation. Chechnya and Mount Elbrus are specifically listed as Level 4 regions. Terrorism, civil unrest, health, kidnapping and wrongful detention are all noted as risks.

Russia Invades Ukraine: A Timeline

TOPSHOT - Black smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv  on February 24, 2022. - Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a military operation in Ukraine today with explosions heard soon after across the country and its foreign minister warning a "full-scale invasion" was underway. (Photo by Aris Messinis / AFP) (Photo by ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images)

Somalia: A severe drought resulting from five failed rainy seasons in a row killed 43,000 people in 2022, and caused a famine amid conflict with Islamist insurgents . Violent crime is common throughout Somalia , pirates frequent its coast off the Horn of Africa, and medical facilities, where they exist, have limited capacity. Crime, terrorism, civil unrest, health and kidnapping are all risk factors. In January 2024, some passengers aboard a U.N.-contracted helicopter were taken hostage by al-Shabaab militants after the vehicle crashed in central Somalia.

South Sudan: Crime, kidnapping and armed conflict are the primary risk factors for South Sudan, which separated from Sudan in 2011, making it the world’s newest country . Weapons are readily available, and travelers have been victims of sexual assault and armed robbery.

Sudan: The U.S. evacuated its embassy in Khartoum in April 2023, and the country closed its airspace due to the ongoing conflict in the country, only permitting humanitarian aid and evacuation efforts. Fighting has escalated in the region between two warring generals seeking to gain control after a military coup in 2021 ousted the country’s prime minister. Civil unrest is the primary risk factor for Africa’s third largest country by area. Crime, terrorism, kidnapping and armed conflict are also noted. The International Criminal Court began investigating alleged war crimes and violence against African ethnic groups in the country in 2023. Millions have fled their homes due to conflict, and the U.N. has said its efforts to provide aid have been hindered by a lack of support, safety and resources. As recently as December 2023, the United Nations warned of catastrophic famine , with millions of children at-risk for malnutrition .

Syria: The advisory states that “No part of Syria is safe from violence,” with terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, armed conflict and risk of unjust detention all potential risk factors. U.S. citizens are often a target for kidnappings and detention. The U.S. Embassy in Damascus halted operations in 2012. Fighting in neighboring Israel has escalated since October, and the conflict has spilled over into Syria, where the U.S. has carried out air strikes following drone and rocket attacks against American troops in Syria and Iraq, triggered by the Israel-Hamas war.

Ukraine: Russian setbacks in their invasion of Ukraine buoyed hopes in Ukraine in 2023. However, Ukraine is a Level 4 country due to Russia’s invasion, with crime and civil unrest also noted as risk factors. The country’s forces shot down two Russian fighter jets on Christmas Eve 2023, in a move Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said “sets the right mood for the entire year ahead.”

Venezuela: Human rights abuses and lack of health care plague this South American nation, which has been in a political crisis since 2014. In 2019, diplomatic personnel were withdrawn from the U.S. Embassy in Caracas. Threats in the country include crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, wrongful detention and poor health infrastructure.

Yemen: Six of the nine risk factors defined by the State Department – terrorism, civil unrest, health risks, kidnapping, armed conflict and landmines – are all present in Yemen. Despite private companies offering tourist visits to the Yemeni island of Socotra, the U.S. government argues those arranging such visits “are putting tourists in danger.” Civil war and cholera are also both present throughout the country. The U.S. Embassy in Sanaa halted operations in 2015. The country has experienced a relative lull in the civil war fighting, but as peace negotiations have gotten traction, flare ups in the fighting have jeopardized progress. Most recently, the U.S. and U.K. have carried out a series of airstrikes in the country, targeting Iran-backed Houthi sites.

Other Countries to Watch

Since Jan. 1, the State Department has updated travel advisories for 12 different countries as well as for the West Bank and Gaza, adding information about specific regions or risk factors, or simply renewing an existing advisory. Travel advisory levels can change based on several factors in a nation, such as increased civil unrest, policies that affect human rights or higher risks of unlawful detention.

The State Department has given about 25 countries an assessment of Level 3, meaning it recommends people “reconsider travel” to those destinations.

On Oct. 14, one week after the deadly Hamas attack on Israel, Israel and the West Bank were both moved from Level 2 to Level 3, while Gaza remains at Level 4. The region’s travel advisory was updated again in November to reflect travel restrictions for certain government employees who have not already left the area, and it was updated again on Jan. 3.

China became a Level 3 country in late 2020, with an update in December 2022 citing “the surge in COVID-19 cases, arbitrary enforcement of local laws, and COVID-19-related restrictions” as the reason for the advisory. In June 2023, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) was moved from the Level 3 to the Level 2 list, but travelers are still advised to be cautious in the area due to “arbitrary enforcement of local laws.” Meanwhile, Macau remains at Level 3.

Following an attempted coup in August 2023, Niger was elevated to Level 4 in August and the Department of State ordered all non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members to leave the U.S. Embassy in Niamey. In early January 2024, the overall risk level for the country was lowered back to Level 3. Despite the new classification, the State Department still asks non-emergency government personnel and eligible family members to depart the country.

In mid-December 2023 there was an explosion at Guinea’s main fuel depot which has since affected access to health care and basic goods and services. The country was subsequently designated a Level 3 nation after having previously been Level 2. Concerns about civil unrest, health, crime and fuel shortages impacting local infrastructure were listed as the primary risk factors contributing to the change.

Several Level 3 countries are among the worst countries for human trafficking, as designated by the State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report . Level 3 countries on this list include Papua New Guinea, Guinea Bissau, China and Chad. There are also nine Level 4 countries designated as among the worst for human trafficking: Afghanistan, Belarus, Iran, Myanmar, North Korea, Russia, Syria, South Sudan and Venezuela.

Over 70 countries are currently at Level 2, meaning the State Department recommends travelers “exercise increased caution” when traveling to those destinations.

Sweden is designated a Level 2 country, with terrorism noted as the primary risk factor in the country. France, which saw nationwide protests throughout 2023, has civil unrest and terrorism noted as risk factors for its Level 2 status.

In September 2023, Gabon was added to the Level 2 list for civil unrest after having been Level 1. The month prior, a coup in Gabon ousted President Ali Bongo Ondimba, who had been in power since 2009, just minutes after it was announced he had been elected for another term. Within the week, the military junta swore in Gen. Brice Clotaire Oligui Nguema – the former leader’s cousin and head of the republican guard – as the country’s head of state. The African Union suspended the country’s membership shortly after the coup. The cities of Libreville and Port Gentil are specifically noted for risk of crime, and some areas have a nighttime curfew in effect.

Bangladesh 's Level 2 travel advisory was updated in October 2023 to add a note about the country’s upcoming general election Jan. 7, 2024. The advisory states “demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.”

In November, several Level 2 travel advisories were updated with new cautionary information. The advisory for Ghana was updated in November 2023 to reflect threats against LGBTQI+ travelers specifically, noting “anti-LGBTQI+ rhetoric and violence have increased in recent years.” Meanwhile, the advisory for South Africa now notes that routes recommended by GPS may be unsafe with higher risk for crime.

Turkmenistan was moved off of the Level 2 list to become the newest addition to the Level 1 list on Jan. 22, meaning normal precautions are recommended but there are no risk factors causing travelers to practice increased caution.

The State Department asks travelers to pay attention to travel advisory levels and alerts , review country information pages for their destinations and read related country security reports before going abroad.

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Tags: Russia , Ukraine , Travel , Coronavirus , Travel Tips , Israel , Gaza , violence , Civil War , crime , kidnapping

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Travelers to Mexico now see state-specific travel warnings from the US government

Caroline Tanner

Travelers to Mexico heeding U.S. State Department warnings should be aware of new state-specific alerts for various parts of Mexico.

The State Department's official travel warnings for Mexico should be used by travelers to evaluate safety concerns in specific Mexican states, based on a breakdown of risk indicators such as crime and kidnapping for specific destinations, rather than the country as a whole.

For more TPG news delivered each morning to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter .

While the State Department normally issues a Level 1 to 4 warning for each country in the world based on concern for the overall safety for travelers, the travel advisory for Mexico was last updated as "Other" on May 2.

do not travel map of mexico

Per a State Department official, the change for Mexico warnings is a result of the State Department shifting gears last month away from COVID-19 concerns, which is currently the focus of warnings from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

"In March 2021, the Department updated its Travel Advisory framework to more heavily weigh the CDC's COVID-19 Travel Health Notices (THN) levels," a State Department official said. "This meant that from March 2021 to April 2022, our Travel Advisory levels were in most cases directly correlated to the CDC's COVID-19 THN levels."

State Travel Advisories no longer match the CDC's COVID-19 Travel Health Notice levels as of April, which is when the CDC removed every country from its highest Level 4: Do Not Travel warning in an effort to reserve that highest alert level for limited circumstances.

"The Department of State's goal is that U.S. citizens planning travel to Mexico focus on the particular area of ​​​​Mexico to which they will be traveling," they said.

do not travel map of mexico

Read more: The difference between CDC and State Department travel warnings

Travelers should continue to view Mexican state-specific advisories like they do country advisories, as they are based on risk factors which include the possibility of tourists encountering concerns related to crime, terrorism, kidnapping, hostage-taking, civil unrest, natural disasters and health.

Mexico's current warning advises travelers should be aware of "widespread and common violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery," while also noting that the U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico since travel by government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted.

"In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities," the warning reads.

Additionally, the State Department says travelers should not currently travel to, or should reconsider or exercise increased caution when traveling to 30 of the 32 listed areas.

do not travel map of mexico

The Department is currently advising Americans to avoid traveling to the regions of Colima, Guerrero, Michoacan, Sinaloa and Tamaulipas "due to crime and kidnapping," while asking tourists to "reconsider travel" to Baja California, Nayarit and Mexico State, among other areas. The language regarding travel to those states has not changed since April but has been expanded to include additional territories.

Earlier this week , Mexico Tourism Secretary Miguel Torruco Marqués and U.S. Ambassador Rena Bitter, the Undersecretary of State for Consular Affairs, discussed the State Department's approach to travel advisories for Mexico, which for much of the pandemic, has warned Americans of travel to certain parts of Mexico due to an increased risk of crime.

Read more: UPDATE: Using new ranking system, CDC removes every country from 'do not travel' list

Marqués reportedly asked the State Department to differentiate between isolated acts of violence that occur near tourist destinations and how those events are positioned as affecting the likelihood of crime visitors may face overall, such as how an event like last week's death of two people in a bar in Cancun ultimately factors into the government's weekly travel advisories.

The tourist secretary pointed out that "some isolated cases of insecurity are found several kilometers from tourist destinations," according to local reporting.

This recent conversation between government officials follows the deployment of 6,000 troops in Cancun, part of an increased security presence in response to crime and drug trafficking issues seen this year, including two fatal shootings in January involving Canadian tourists at a five-star hotel in Playa del Carmen and another incident that killed a bar manager at a nearby beach club .

In addition to the State Department, the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Mexico, which regularly issues safety updates regarding travel to Mexico , has also issued separate enhanced warnings for travelers this year, including in March when they told Spring Break goers to consider the risk of crime, sexual assault and illegal drug use in popular tourist destinations.

Read more: Americans should consider safety factors beyond COVID-19 when traveling this summer, State Department says

Bottom line

Travel advisories issued by the State Department and those warnings related to COVID-19 via the CDC should be taken for what they are — an official warning from the U.S. government. Traveling abroad always involves an inherent amount of risk as you are stepping off American soil.

"We are committed to providing U.S. citizens with clear, timely, and reliable information about every country in the world so they can make informed travel decisions," the State Department official said. "We provide comprehensive safety and security information for every country in the world to help citizens assess the risks of travel."

Should you choose to travel to a country with an elevated travel warning , note that you may not be able to receive assistance from the U.S. government due to limited services being available.

Related: Airlines concerned about safety in Mexico City's airspace

NBC New York

U.S. State Department Issues Travel Warning for These States in Mexico

The mexican government sent hundreds of troops to the border region last week after cars and businesses were set on fire in response to a series of arrests of drug cartel figures., by heather navarro • published august 17, 2022 • updated on august 18, 2022 at 3:55 pm.

The U.S. Department of State has reissued a travel warning Tuesday in multiple states in Mexico , alerting American visitors to the high risk of crime and kidnappings in regions of the country.

The State Department warns travelers about cartel-related crime as well.

The travel advisory comes on the heels of a shelter-in-place alert in the Tijuana region , where cartel violence erupted last week in response to a series of arrests of drug cartel figures.

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Mexico sent hundreds of troops to the border region after cars, buses and businesses were set on fire. Images and videos shared on social media showed the chaos and destruction.

Aside from the warnings for everyday citizens, U.S. government employees have been direct to not travel alone, or to remote areas, avoid travel between cities after dark, and urged to use dispatched cars instead of taxis.

Here is a list of Mexican states where travel is not recommended:

Do Not Travel To:

  • Colima state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Guerrero state  due to crime.
  • Michoacan state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Sinaloa state d ue to crime and kidnapping
  • Tamaulipas state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Zacatecas  state due to crime and kidnapping.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Baja California  state due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Chihuahua state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Durango state  due to crime.
  • Guanajuato state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Jalisco state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Morelos state due to crime.
  • Sonora state  due to crime and kidnapping.

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

  • Aguascalientes  state due to crime.
  • Baja California Sur state  due to crime.
  • Chiapas state  due to crime.
  • Coahuila state  due to crime.
  • Hidalgo state  due to crime.
  • Mexico City  due to crime.
  • Mexico State  due to crime.
  • Nayarit state  due to crime.
  • Nuevo Leon  state due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Oaxaca state  due to crime.
  • Puebla state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Queretaro state  due to crime.
  • Quintana Roo state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • San Luis Potosi state  due to crime and kidnapping.
  • Tabasco state  due to crime.
  • Tlaxcala stat e due to crime.
  • Veracruz state  due to crime.

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

  • Campeche state.
  • Yucatan state .

View a travel advisory map of Mexico here .

The Department of State site recommends that if you do travel despite the warnings, you should follow these safety rules:

  • Keep traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text it to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Mexico.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

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Map Shows States Joining Forces With Greg Abbott in Border Standoff

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Republican governors across the U.S. have backed Texas in its escalating conflict with the Biden administration over immigration enforcement.

In a 5-4 vote on Monday, the Supreme Court sided with the administration by ruling that federal agents could—for now—resume cutting razor wire that Texas had installed along a stretch of the U.S.-Mexico border. The installation of the concertina wire along the Rio Grande was among several aggressive measures Texas Governor Greg Abbott has taken at the border in his efforts to stop migrants from entering the U.S. illegally.

In the days since the ruling, Texas has erected even more razor wire near the border. Abbott has said the fight is "not over" and praised Texas National Guard soldiers for continuing to "hold the line."

In a statement Wednesday, the Republican governor said Texas has a constitutional "right to self-defense " and that the state is "acting on that authority, as well as state law, to secure the Texas border."

Texas National Guard soldiers install additional wire

"The Executive Branch of the United States has a constitutional duty to enforce federal laws protecting States, including immigration laws on the books right now," Abbott said. "President Biden has refused to enforce those laws and has even violated them."

The Biden administration's failure to "fulfill the duties imposed by" Article IV, Section 4 of the Constitution "has triggered Article I, § 10, Clause 3, "which reserves to this State the right of self-defense," Abbott said.

🚨𝗕𝗥𝗘𝗔𝗞𝗜𝗡𝗚 - These amazing governors have all joined forces in supporting Texas’s Governor Greg Abbott against the unconstitutional SCOTUS ruling that tried to prevent Texas from securing the border against illegal invaders!🔥🔥🔥 Ron DeSantis of Florida Glenn Youngkin… pic.twitter.com/nCdVnWZhVG — Right Angle News Network (@Rightanglenews) January 25, 2024

"For these reasons, I have already declared an invasion under Article I, § 10, Clause 3 to invoke Texas's constitutional authority to defend and protect itself. That authority is the supreme law of the land and supersedes any federal statutes to the contrary," he said.

Newsweek has contacted Abbott's spokesman and the White House for comment via email.

Abbott's declaration prompted the Republican governors of Florida, Georgia, Montana, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Virginia to take to social media and express support for Texas. On X (formerly Twitter ), the conservative Right Angle News Network shared a map of the U.S. highlighting the states that have publicly backed Abbott.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis , who ended his presidential run on Sunday, said in a post on X that Texas "is upholding the law while Biden is flouting it."

If the Constitution really made states powerless to defend themselves against an invasion, it wouldn’t have been ratified in the first place and Texas would have never joined the union when it did. TX is upholding the law while Biden is flouting it. FL will keep assisting… https://t.co/qOJY2zT1hG — Ron DeSantis (@GovRonDeSantis) January 24, 2024

"If the Constitution really made states powerless to defend themselves against an invasion, it wouldn't have been ratified in the first place and Texas would have never joined the union when it did," DeSantis wrote. He added that Florida would continue "assisting Texas with personnel and assets."

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp said Abbott and Texas "have our full support."

"Enough is enough. Our southern border is in crisis thanks to the Biden administration's refusal to do their job," he wrote on X .

Enough is enough. Our southern border is in crisis thanks to the Biden administration’s refusal to do their job. @GregAbbott_TX and the state of Texas have our full support. https://t.co/dmJKMsviTV — Brian Kemp (@BrianKempGA) January 25, 2024

Montana Governor Greg Gianforte said Abbott "is doing what [Biden] won't."

He wrote on X that by "refusing to act, President Biden is inviting cartels, illegal drugs, and human trafficking into the United States."

Governor @GregAbbott_TX is doing what @POTUS won’t. By refusing to act, President Biden is inviting cartels, illegal drugs, and human trafficking into the United States. We must secure the southern border. https://t.co/K1tAy6pE4e — Governor Greg Gianforte (@GovGianforte) January 24, 2024

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt wrote that Oklahoma "stands with Texas."

Oklahoma stands with Texas. https://t.co/67VzVEfEv1 — Governor Kevin Stitt (@GovStitt) January 24, 2024

Praising Abbott, South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem said he is "exactly right to invoke Texas' constitutional authority to defend itself." She wrote that her state has been "proud to help" Abbott's "efforts to secure our border."

. @GregAbbott_TX is exactly right to invoke Texas’ constitutional authority to defend itself. The Biden Administration has created a national security crisis and put Americans in danger. Their failure is an unconstitutional dereliction of duty. South Dakota has been proud to… https://t.co/s4NMyvyu3Y — Kristi Noem (@KristiNoem) January 24, 2024

In Virginia, Governor Glenn Youngkin also took to social media and declared that his state "stands with Texas."

Abbott is "doing the job Joe Biden and his border czar refuse to do to secure our border," he wrote on X. "The Biden administration has turned every state to a border state."

Virginia stands with Texas. @GregAbbott_TX is doing the job Joe Biden and his border czar refuse to do to secure our border. The Biden administration has turned every state into a border state. We must stop the flow of fentanyl, save lives, and secure our southern border. https://t.co/XaPu2RqJBP — Glenn Youngkin (@GlennYoungkin) January 25, 2024
  • Texas newspaper rips Greg Abbott's "performative defiance" at border
  • Biden admin responds to push to seize Texas National Guard from Greg Abbott
  • Greg Abbott vows "this is not over" after Supreme Court border loss
  • Greg Abbott praises soldiers holding "line" after Supreme Court border loss

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About the writer

Khaleda Rahman is Newsweek's Senior News Reporter based in London, UK. Her focus is reporting on abortion rights, race, education, sexual abuse and capital punishment. Khaleda joined Newsweek in 2019 and had previously worked at the MailOnline in London, New York and Sydney. She is a graduate of University College London. Languages: English.

You can get in touch with Khaleda by emailing [email protected]

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Did GOP Governors Deploy State National Guard Units To Support Texas in January 2024?

A claim posted on x on jan. 25, 2024, spread a rumor about republican-led u.s. states, texas and the southern border., jordan liles, published jan 26, 2024.

On Jan. 25, 2024, a viral rumor began to spread online that claimed some Republican governors of U.S. states were sending brand-new deployments of their state National Guard units to aid Texas in its effort to secure the U.S.-Mexico border.

The rumor was posted ( archived ) by the @NewsWire_US account and included a map with 15 states highlighted: "Governors from 15 states have now announced support for Texas in its border dispute with the federal government, with some sending National Guard units." The following day, a metric under the post showed it had been viewed 14 million times.

A rumor said that some of the 25 Republican governors who signed a joint statement of solidarity with Texas and Governor Greg Abbott had sent new deployments in January 2024 of state National Guard service members to Texas to aid with security along the Southern border.

The post's mention of a border dispute concerned an ever-evolving saga that was underway in January 2024 involving Texas, President Joe Biden's administration, Republican governors and the U.S. Supreme Court. The dispute was over the fact that federal Border Patrol agents were being blocked by Texas state officials from accessing a historically busy migrant entry point along the southern border.

The claim in the post on X was virally shared on Reddit – either as text or a screenshot of the post – with the headline, "LET'S F---ING GO." It was also shared on Instagram , LinkedIn , iFunny.co and at least one message board .

Hours after the first post, the @NewsWire_US account posted ( archived ), "UPDATE - 25 Republican governors issue a joint statement in support of Texas in its border dispute with the federal government, Vermont's governor was the lone exception."

A rumor said that some of the 25 Republican governors who signed a joint statement of solidarity with Texas and Governor Greg Abbott had sent new deployments in January 2024 of state National Guard service members to Texas to aid with security along the Southern border.

It's true that 25 Republican governors signed a joint statement of "solidarity" on Jan. 25, 2024, in support of the state of Texas and its elected leader, Gov. Greg Abbott, in regard to a dispute at the U.S.-Mexico border.

However, as of Jan. 25 – the day the rumor began spreading on X – we were unable to uncover any information indicating any Republican governors had issued new orders to deploy state National Guard units to the border.

Further, missing from the posts on X that discussed the fact that the phrase "civil war" was trending with this subject was the fact that a majority of the Republican governors who signed the joint statement had, in the past, sent relatively small numbers of their individual state National Guard units to the southern border. Some of those service members remained in Texas as of January 2024.

It's possible that some of the Republican governors who signed the statement might in the days and weeks following Jan. 25 order fresh deployments of their state National Guard units to aid Texas in its border security efforts. Former President Donald Trump posted on his Truth Social platform on Jan. 25, "We encourage all willing states to deploy their guards to Texas to prevent the entry of illegals, and to remove them back across the border."

Snopes reached out to @NewsWire_US to ask for evidence that states had sent new deployments of state National Guard units to Texas, as some social media users sharing the post had interpreted it that way. In response, @NewsWire_US sent only information about deployments that occurred before January 2024.

Let's look at the facts of the case in more detail.

The Border Dispute in Shelby Park

Earlier in January 2024, the Texas Military Department began blocking federal Border Patrol agents from accessing a park named Shelby Park in Eagle Pass, Texas.

Texas officials' installation of concertina wire, commonly known as razor wire , prevented federal border agents from accessing to the park, which is situated along the Rio Grande and had been a busy entry point for migrants crossing from Mexico into the U.S. The razor wire had been the subject of reports of bloodied migrants who had sustained wounds and broken bones, including a 19-year-old woman who was found cut by the wire and having a miscarriage.

According to The Associated Press , Texas' action to block access to the city-owned park was carried out despite the fact that the area had experienced a "sharp decrease" in the number of migrants crossing the border earlier in January. At the same time, however, border agents had recorded an all-time monthly high number of migrants crossing the southern border into the U.S. in December. The majority of the crossings occurred in the Tucson, Arizona, and Del Rio, Texas, areas.

Renae Eze, a spokeswoman for Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, said in a public statement on Jan. 11, "Texas will continue to deploy Texas National Guard soldiers, DPS troopers and more barriers, utilizing every tool and strategy to respond to President Biden’s ongoing border crisis."

As Snopes previously reported , the U.S. Supreme Court got involved in the dispute after the Justice Department asked the high court to order Texas to stop blocking access for Border Patrol agents.

On Jan. 22, 2024, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision that Border Patrol agents would be allowed to resume cutting the nearly 30 miles of razor wire that the state had installed near Eagle Pass. The ruling came after a federal appeals court in December forced the Border Patrol to stop cutting the wire, the AP reported.

"Texas' political stunts, like placing razor wire near the border, simply make it harder and more dangerous for frontline personnel to do their jobs," White House spokesperson Angelo Fernández Hernández said, in a statement also previously reported by the AP.

For his part, Abbott, on Jan. 24, released a statement declaring Texas' "constitutional right to self-defense" given that "President Biden has violated his oath to faithfully execute immigration laws enacted by Congress."

25 Republican Governors Signed Letter Supporting Texas

On Jan. 25, the Republican Governors Organization published a joint statement , naming 25 Republican governors who confirmed their "support of Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Texas' constitutional right to self-defense."

"We stand in solidarity with our fellow Governor, Greg Abbott, and the State of Texas in utilizing every tool and strategy, including razor wire fences, to secure the border," the statement read. "We do it in part because the Biden Administration is refusing to enforce immigration laws already on the books and is illegally allowing mass parole across America of migrants who entered our country illegally."

The 25 governors who issued the statement were Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy, Arkansas Gov. Sarah Sanders, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, Idaho Gov. Brad Little, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, Louisiana Gov. Jeff Landry, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte, Nebraska Gov. Jim Pillen, Nevada Gov. Joe Lombardo, New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, Utah Gov. Spencer Cox, Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice and Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon.

As of Jan. 26, the only other Republican governor whose name was missing from the letter was Vermont Gov. Phil Scott.

Previous State National Guard Deployments

Some of the Republican governors who signed the January 2024 joint statement previously sent relatively small deployments of their state National Guard units to assist with border security, including Ivey , Dunleavy , Sanders , DeSantis , Kemp , Reynolds , Reeves , Parson , Gianforte , Pillen , Sununu , Burgum , DeWine , Stitt , McMaster , Noem , Lee , Cox , Youngkin and Justice .

In DeWine's case, he posted on X that some Ohio National Guard members deployed to the southern border in October 2023 remained there as of late January 2024.

Meanwhile, on Jan. 26, both DeSantis and Stitt were both reportedly considering sending additional state service members to Texas. At press time, neither governor had made a formal announcement confirming such deployments.

The number of state National Guard service members that each of the Republican governors previously deployed to the border ranged from as few as four or 10 to as many as several hundred. This numerical information was absent from many of the posts that attempted to frame the U.S-Texas border protection dispute as a "civil war." For reference, more than 3 million men fought in the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865.

“Alaska National Guard to Deploy to U.S. Southern Border.” Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy , 6 Mar. 2019, https://gov.alaska.gov/alaska-national-guard-to-deploy-to-u-s-southern-border/.

“Burgum, Dohrmann Thank Returning ND National Guard Members for Efforts to Secure Southwest Border.” North Dakota Office of the Governor , 30 Aug. 2023, https://www.governor.nd.gov/news/burgum-dohrmann-thank-returning-nd-national-guard-members-efforts-secure-southwest-border.

Coronado, Acacia. “Texas Trooper’s Accounts of Bloodied and Fainting Migrants on US-Mexico Border Unleashes Criticism.” The Associated Press , 18 July 2023, https://apnews.com/article/texas-border-razor-wire-fainting-7aa811baf2708b89a0316804c3f2e35e.

Everett, Grayson. “Ivey Deploys Alabama National Guard Troops to U.S.-Mexico Border.” Yellowhammer News , 6 Oct. 2023, https://yellowhammernews.com/ivey-deploys-alabama-national-guard-troops-to-u-s-mexico-border/.

Gonzalez, Valerie. “Mayor Says Texas Closed Park without Permission in Border City Where Migrant Crossings Had Climbed.” The Associated Press , 11 Jan. 2024, https://apnews.com/article/texas-border-eagle-pass-98a0ea1c1b7c1713df9b76b5759a63ff.

“Gov. Justice Authorizes West Virginia National Guard Deployment to Southern Border.” Office of the Governor of West Virginia , 31 May 2023, https://governor.wv.gov/News/press-releases/2023/Pages/-Gov.-Justice-authorizes-West-Virginia-National-Guard-deployment-to-Southern-Border.aspx.

“Gov. Kemp Joins American Governors’ Border Strike Task Force.” Governor Brian P. Kemp: Office of the Governor , 19 Apr. 2022, https://gov.georgia.gov/press-releases/2022-04-19/gov-kemp-joins-american-governors-border-strike-task-force.

“Gov. Noem Going to Warzone at Southern Border.” News.SD.Gov , 25 Jan. 2024, https://news.sd.gov/news?id=news_kb_article_view&sys_id=01eadcd81b4802507471748d9c4bcbc8.

“Gov. Pillen to Visit Nebraska National Guard Soldiers at the U.S.-Mexico Border.” Governor Jim Pillen: Officer of the Governor , 21 Aug. 2023, https://governor.nebraska.gov/press/gov-pillen-visit-nebraska-national-guard-soldiers-us-mexico-border.

“Gov. Reynolds Provides Results on Operation Lone Star Deployment to U.S. Southern Border.” Governor Kim Reynolds , 25 Oct. 2023, https://governor.iowa.gov/press-release/2023-10-25/gov-reynolds-provides-results-operation-lone-star-deployment-us-southern.

“Governor Gianforte: Joe Biden’s Left Our Country Completely Vulnerable.” Montana.gov , 25 Jan. 2024, https://news.mt.gov/Governors-Office/Governor_Gianforte_Joe_Bidens_Left_Our_Country_Completely_Vulnerable.

“Governor Parson Provides Update on Missouri National Guard Troops at Border.” Governor Michael L. Parson , 20 Aug. 2018, https://governor.mo.gov/press-releases/archive/governor-parson-provides-update-missouri-national-guard-troops-border.

“Governor Ron DeSantis: ‘Florida Is Sending Help to Texas to Secure the Southern Border.’” Ron DeSantis: 46th Governor of Florida , 16 May 2023, https://www.flgov.com/2023/05/16/governor-ron-desantis-florida-is-sending-help-to-texas-to-secure-the-southern-border/.

“Governor Sanders Deploys Arkansas National Guard to Southern Border - Arkansas Governor.” Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders , 5 June 2023, https://governor.arkansas.gov/news_post/governor-sanders-deploys-arkansas-national-guard-to-southern-border/.

“Governor Stitt to Send Oklahoma National Guard Troops to Southern Border.” Oklahoma Governor J. Kevin Stitt , 1 June 2023, https://oklahoma.gov/governor/newsroom/newsroom/2023/june2023/governor-stitt-to-send-oklahoma-national-guard-troops-to-souther.html.

@GovMikeDeWine. “Ohio Has Stepped up to Assist and Has Had a Continuous Presence on the Border since October 2020, When I Deployed Approximately 115 Members of the Ohio National Guard to Support the Southwest Border Operations in Texas.” X (Formerly Twitter) , 25 Jan. 2024, https://twitter.com/GovMikeDeWine/status/1750632714569449790.

Hammonds, Dalton. “Gov. Lee to Send 100 Tennessee National Guard Troops to the Southern Border.” News Channel 5 Nashville (WTVF) , 25 May 2023, https://www.newschannel5.com/news/gov-lee-to-send-100-tennessee-national-guard-troops-to-the-southern-border.

Izzo, Jack. “Did Supreme Court Side with Biden Administration on Removing Razor Wire from Texas-Mexico Border?” Snopes , 24 Jan. 2024, https://www.snopes.com/news/2024/01/23/texas-mexico-border-razor-wire/.

Kisluk, Jessica. “Sununu Visits New Hampshire National Guard Soldiers Deployed to Southern U.S. Border.” WMUR , 21 July 2023, https://www.wmur.com/article/sununu-visits-nh-national-guard-southern-border/44605830.

Knox, Sara. “Gov. Cox Welcomes Home Utah National Guard Members.” KUTV , 5 Nov. 2021, https://kutv.com/news/local/gov-cox-welcomes-home-utah-national-guard-members.

“Mississippi Sends National Guard to US-Mexico Border, GOP Governor Says.” The Associated Press , 17 May 2023, https://apnews.com/article/mississippi-governor-mexico-border-national-guard-aff6a8741893ff40a1697eaaadf6e55f.

Montoya-Galvez, Camilo. “Migrant Crossings at U.S. Southern Border Reach Record Monthly High in December.” CBS News , 28 Dec. 2023, https://www.cbsnews.com/news/migrant-crossings-u-s-southern-border-record-monthly-high-december/.

Oberg, Ted, et al. “Virginia National Guard Finds No Fentanyl, Refers 86 Migrants a Day during $2 Million Trip to Texas Border.” NBC4 Washington , 16 Oct. 2023, https://www.nbcwashington.com/investigations/virginia-national-guard-finds-no-fentanyl-refers-86-migrants-a-day-during-2-million-trip-to-texas-border/3445518/.

Phillips, Patrick. “McMaster Joins Other GOP Governors in Statement on Texas Border Security.” LIVE 5 News , 25 Jan. 2024, https://www.live5news.com/2024/01/25/mcmaster-joins-other-gop-governors-statement-texas-border-security/.

“Republican Governors Band Together, Issue Joint Statement Supporting Texas’ Constitutional Right to Self-Defense.” Republican Governors Association , 25 Jan. 2024, https://www.rga.org/republican-governors-ban-together-issue-joint-statement-supporting-texas-constitutional-right-self-defense/.

Sanchez, Sandra, et al. “State of Texas: State Blocks Border Patrol from Area along Rio Grande.” KXAN Austin , 14 Jan. 2024, https://www.kxan.com/state-of-texas/state-of-texas-state-blocks-border-patrol-from-area-along-rio-grande/.

Sherman, Mark, and Paul J. Weber. “Supreme Court Allows Federal Agents to Cut Razor Wire Texas Installed on US-Mexico Border.” The Associated Press , 22 Jan. 2024, https://apnews.com/article/supreme-court-immigration-texas-razor-wire-9daef6bd316211b6633ece718e505187.

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By Jordan Liles

Jordan Liles is a Senior Reporter who has been with Snopes since 2016.

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